Industry Brand B-7

by B.B. Pelletier

Our favorite guest blogger, Vince, is at it again. Today, he shares his experience of testing a Chinese airgun.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email us.

Now, take it away, Vince!

Ahhh… the way we were! The way some of us were, anyway. By “us,” I’m referring to those of us who first got into airguns (or came back to airguns) after being seduced by those irrascible Chinese. I’m going back about, oh, 10 years or so ago, when, waltzing through the internet, we would find all sorts of places selling “The Chinese Can Opener” or the “High-Power Military Training Air Rifle.” What a deal they were — my goodness, why on earth would ANYONE spend $100 or more on one of those high-falutin’ overpriced airguns when these $25 Chinese models were obviously just as good? And we knew they were just as good because that number said so!

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A tale of two TS45 rifles

by B.B. Pelletier

Unlike most of us, Vince gets to look under the hood of a lot of strange airguns. Today, we’ll get a peek at two that are related but separated by years.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email us.

Bloggers must know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them), and they must use proper English. We’ll edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

by Vince

Yup. BB was right. Pointy is a TS45. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

Let me back up a bit. Some time ago I blogged a older no-name sidelever Chinese airgun I bought in a bunch with some bottom-feeder Industry Brand stuff. Normally, I wouldn’t have given any of those pea-shooters a second thought, but this particular rifle demonstrated one unexpected quality that really caught my attention: It shot GOOD!

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I’m from China. Do you know my name?

by B.B. Pelletier

Blog reader Vince has been very busy! Last week he gave us a 2-part guest blog, and this week he’s given us another blog. Like mysteries? Get out our magnifying glass and help Vince uncover the name of this air rifle.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email us.

Bloggers must be proficient in the simple html that Blogger software uses, know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them), and they must use proper English. We’ll edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

by Vince

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Industry Brand B3-1 – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This inexpensive Chinese underlever has been around in one form or another for many decades.

Today, I’ll finish the report on the B3-1 underlever rifle. I did this report for C-S, who now goes by the handle Milan, and for a couple other readers who said they wanted to know something about these older Chinese airguns. We ran Mac’s report of the Weihrauch HW97 underlever at the same time, so if you wanted to compare the two rifles it was possible. Actually, there wasn’t much to compare — just a lot to contrast, because these two air rifles couldn’t be farther apart.

I shot the rifle from a rest at 10 meters because I wasn’t confident that the rifle could perform at a longer distance. At least at 10 meters it would stay on the target paper. I used the artillery hold with the rifle rested on the backs of my fingers for maximum stability.

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Industry Brand B3-1 – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

The August podcast was posted on Sunday. Sorry it was late. I apologize for the weak sound of my voice. I actually feel stronger than my voice indicates. I expect things to return to normal some time in the near future. Now, on to today’s blog.

Part 1


This inexpensive Chinese underlever has been around in one form or another for many decades.

Today, I’ll check the velocity of my B3-1. I’ll also check a couple other things for you. Cocking effort first.

Cocking effort
I mentioned in Part 1 that the cocking effort seems high for the power range of this gun. Well, it tested lower than I expected, so I’m just a weakling. To test the cocking effort of an underlever, you place a non-digital bathroom scale on a table and position the cocking lever near the middle of the footpad on the scale. When I did that, the rifle took 31 lbs. of force to cock. I would have sworn it was above 35, but the scale doesn’t lie. I do believe that if the internal parts were deburred and properly lubricated, the effort to cock would drop by a couple of pounds.

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Industry Brand B3-1 – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

I’m writing this report for C-S and for all the other readers who ask about the Chinese airguns. I go back to the 1980s with the B3 design, because I bought one of the first ones through an ad in American Rifleman in the mid-1980s.

That rifle was the epitome of crude! It had poorly finished, poorly fitted metal parts sitting in a pallet-wood stock finished with too much orange shellac. The front sight was rotated to one side, and the synthetic breech seal was cracked and flaking off. The metal parts looked as if they had been dragged behind a tractor a few days, then given a blue from the 14th use of the salts. The word I’m searching for is disgusting.

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