Benjamin Trail Nitro Piston Mark II pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Train NP II
Benjamin Trail NP Mark II air pistol.

This report covers:

  • The detent and how I open the gun
  • Velocity
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Discussion
  • Cocking effort
  • Discharge sound
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

The detent and how I open the gun

I’ll start today’s report by answering reader Siraniko’s questions from the last post. He asked me to show the locking detent and how I manage to open the gun for cocking. Here’s the detent.

Benjamin Trail detent
The chisel detent is long and narrow. It’s not under that much spring tension, so it opens easily, but the shallow angle of the slope ensures that it locks the beech securely.

That detent chisel face is long and shallow but the spring is not that strong. I can push it in with my finger. So the long shallow slope of the chisel on the detent is what’s keeping the breech locked so tight. read more


Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman PCP
Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • 2018 Texas Airgun Show
  • Velocity day
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • Discussion 1
  • Hang in there
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Super heavyweight pellet
  • Loud
  • Trigger pull
  • Discussion 2
  • Summary

2018 Texas Airgun Show

The 2018 Texas Airgun Show is approaching fast. It’s on Saturday, June 23. The hall is already filled with dealers and they are now selling spaces on the veranda outside. There are new private vendors attending this year, plus the prizes and giveaways have increased! Pyramyd Air has donated a TX200 Mark III for the raffle! They also donated 20 John Wayne Lil Duke BB guns that we are planning for a special giveaway just for kids. This is the most active selling and shooting airgun show in the country, and if you have always wanted to see a show, this would be the one to attend. read more


The Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump pneumatic rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • Sight adjustment
  • Qiang Yuan training pellets
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • Last group
  • Evaluation thus far

Today we begin to look at the accuracy of the Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump rifle. But before we start, there is a picture I owe some readers.

Dragonfly open
The pump handle is fully extended.

The test

I decided to pump the rifle 3 times per shot for the entire test. In Part 2 we saw how powerful it is, and three pumps are more than enough for any pellet. The distance for this test was 10 meters and the rifle was rested. I used the open sights for today’s test. I shot 5 shots per bull and then selected the best pellet and shot a final group of 10. Let’s get started. read more


The Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump pneumatic rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump air rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • The focus
  • Pumping
  • Pump effort
  • Velocity
  • Test 1. Crosman Premier lite
  • Test 2. Crosman Premier lite
  • Test 3. Two other pellets
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • RWS Hobby
  • Seating pellets
  • Pump lever noise
  • Storing the rifle with air
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump rifle. There certainly is a lot of interest in this air rifle. Some have noted its similarity with the Diana Stormrider and wonder if the Dragonfly can be considered a precharged pneumatic with a built-in pump. Others are quick to point out this rifle is made in China by Snow Peak Airguns (SPA).

Several readers could not envision the pump arm of the rifle from the picture I posted, so here is a side view.

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly side view.

The focus

While it’s nice to know the lineage of the rifle, my interest is how well the Dragonfly performs. Reader Benji-Don sent me his impressions of the rifle, which I will start sharing with you today. This is velocity day, so that’s where we will start. read more


Umarex Strike Point multi-pump pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Strike Point
Umarex Strike Point multi-pump pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • The sights
  • RWS Superdome
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • RWS HyperMax
  • Crosman Premier light
  • RWS Hobby
  • Evaluation

Today we test the accuracy of the new Umarex Strike Point multi-pump pistol. This test is the one we have all been waiting to see. The Strike Point is firmly in competition with the  Crosman 1377, and we want to know how it stacks up downrange.

The test

I shot from 10 meters off a sandbag rest. I shot 5 shots per target because this is a multi-pump. If any pellet grouped well, I would shoot another 10 shots with that pellet. I pumped the gun 4 times per shot, because the velocity test indicated that would be okay.

Sig Match Ballistic Alloy

The first pellet I tested was the Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellet. It wasn’t tested in the velocity test, but this pellet has proved remarkably accurate in many airguns and I thought it deserved a test. Five pellets went into a 2.922-inch group. I’m not showing the dime in this photo because it makes no sense. This is a huge group for 10 meters! Also I noticed that 4 of the five pellet holes showed some tipping of the pellet as it passed through the target. read more


Umarex Gauntlet: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gauntlet
Umarex Gauntlet.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Other items I’m testing
  • Mounting the P.O.I. rings
  • Precision is challenging
  • P.O.I. rings are precision-bored
  • Bug Busters are difficult to position
  • Perfect scope for the Gauntlet
  • Sight-in
  • Shim under the scope
  • Second sight-in
  • Magazine problem!
  • Found it!
  • Summary
  • Evaluation

What a report this is going to be! So many landmark issues resolved and explained!

Other items I’m testing

Although today is about the Umarex Gauntlet, I’m also going to cover the UTG P.O.I. rings for airguns, the new Bug Buster sidewheel and the new UTG 3-12X32 Bug Buster scope. This won’t be just another test day, either, because I had to solve numerous problems to get this far. In fact, although I will show you a target today, this isn’t accuracy day. That comes next time. Today we have issues to resolve. Let’s get started.

Mounting the P.O.I. rings

UTG makes the most precise scope rings I have seen. Although I have seen other scope rings that retail for $500, I have never seen a set that are any more precise as these. I wanted to use them for the remainder of the Gauntlet test, which is going to be a long one. read more


Where are airguns today?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Spring-piston guns
  • The price-point PCP
  • High-pressure air compressors
  • Action air pistols
  • It’s been done before
  • Airgun shows
  • Hunting
  • They’re listening now!
  • Summary

After writing 6 reports on the SHOT Show I thought it was time to look at all that has happened in airgunning in recent years. We are in a golden age of experimentation and refinement, and it’s good to stop and reflect on that for a moment.

Spring-piston guns

If you had asked me what the future of the spring gun was before I attended this SHOT Show I would have told you that everything that could be done had been done. Then, at the show, I saw not one but two novel new breakbarrels.

Crosman has their new Akura breakbarrel with the Precision Barrel Lock or PBL. It is a novel new way of locking the breech at the shot by using some of the compressed air to push a pin back into the spring tube. The rest of the rifle is a straightforward gas spring breachbarrel, but the question we have to ask is why they felt it necessary to lock the breech this way. A few other airguns use mechanical locks that are operated by the user, so there must be an advantage to locking the breech, but will we see it when I test the Akura? read more