by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Today, we’ll finish Vince’s report on his new Relum Telly.

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Over to you, Vince!

The Relum Telly: Part 2
by Vince

When we last saw the Telly, I’d just reduced the cocking effort by repairing the cocking linkage and smoothing the outside of the spring tube. Then I set about to fix the other things that were wrong with my new airgun. I had just fixed the stripped stock screw holes and was about to go into the gun’s innards. So, today join me on a tour of the Telly’s belly.

The piston is basic enough, and the fact that the leather piston seal was still in passable condition saved me a fair bit of hassle. It’s riveted in, so replacement wouldn’t have been very straightforward:

Relum Telly piston seal
The leather piston seal looks good.

Relum Telly piston body
Looking inside the piston reveals the rivet that holds the piston seal to the body.

So, a soaking in 30 weight oil is all it gets before reassembly.

I mentioned the concentric springs earlier. This is what they look like:

Relum Telly springs
The inner and outer mainspring. The inner spring shows a bit of “snakeiness” from its long life.

The thinner inner spring has about 1/3 the spring rate of the outer, which means that it does indeed contribute significantly to the powerplant energy.

The trigger is a linked direct sear. Oddly enough, it’s sorta similar to the linkage in the el-cheapo Industry Brand S2 pistol. The trigger blade pops right out but the actual sear pin is peened in place so I can’t remove the sear block. I’ve sketched in what it sorta looks like, sorta (yellow area).

Relum Telly trigger
The trigger blade came out easily. The sear is held in by a heavily peened pin, so I didn’t remove it. The yellow area is approximately what the sear looks like in profile.

As the blade is pulled back, it rotates the sear block clockwise (downward in back), which releases the piston. Here’s where I discovered something. Remember that goofy lockscrew I noticed in the front triggerguard bolt? It wasn’t a lockscrew at all. The bolt itself threads into the hole identified by the yellow arrow (above picture), and the concentric screw (which is both smaller in diameter and longer) pushes up on the sear block opposite of the trigger. This can be used to reduce the sear engagement and adjust the trigger. In fact, you can adjust it to the point of not even working. I don’t like messing too much with direct sears of any type, so I run the gun with the screw all the way out.

Relum Telly trigger adjustment
What I thought was a lockscrew turned out to be the trigger adjustment screw. It controls the amount of sear engagement area.

All the innards look usable, so after proper cleaning and relubing I reassemble the gun and get ready to shoot.

This is not going to be a super-comprehensive shooting test. Considering how few of these things that are around, the Relum Telly is not exactly a vintage gun you’re gonna want to use as a routine shooter. If you want a nice, usable vintage gun for a youth, get them something like a Diana 25. We just want to see what sort of performance the Telly was capable of.

The gun didn’t like Daisy Precision-Max or Crosman Wadcutters, but (surprise, surprise) it thrives on 7-grain RWS Diabolo Basic pellets. This 5-shot group shows what the gun is capable of at 10 meters:

Relum Telly target
Five RWS Diabolo Basic wadcutters made this 0.35-inch group at 10 meters.

That’s 0.35 inches, center-to-center, with rotten open sights. The rear blade has a “V” notch, while the front post tapers to a point on top — which means to my eyes, the top of the post sorta fades in and out like Captain Kirk stuck in a malfunctioning transporter. It’s very hard to make sure I’m getting a consistent aim point, which makes me think the gun is capable of even better.

Next up is the velocity — and laziness dictates that I only bother testing the pellets that shot well. Or, in this case, the one pellet. After 5 warm-up shots, the gun laid down this string:

618
605
625
603
622
621
624
624
606
623

The average was 617 f.p.s. This is just shy of 6 foot-pounds of energy…which, for the size of the rifle, really isn’t bad. On the OTHER hand, it’s HORRIBLE for a gun that requires as much as or more cocking force than a Diana 350 or a Baikal 513, while delivering less than 1/3 of the energy.

Anyway, it’s at this point that I decided to snap a quick picture of the breech with a pellet loaded to show you how loose it fits:

Relum Telly pellet in breech
See how deep into the breech the pellet falls?

See? It drops right in with no fuss or fighting. But then I get to thinking that SOMEbody’s going to carp about that ancient leather breech seal! So, should I replace it? The gun is probably doing as well as it can, so I have no reason to. In fact, I can even hear that little voice in my head saying, “LEAVE IT ALONE!”

So, naturally I popped it out, destroying it in the process. To my delight, it seems to be the same size as a Diana seal, which means I can use a #109 o-ring. But wait — there’s something funny about the groove it sat in.

Relum Telly breech seal groove
The groove is cut parallel to the bore, but not to the slanted breech. As a result, it’s deeper on the top than on the bottom.

Dang. The breech face is slanted on this gun (like on a lot of Dianas), and the groove is cut parallel to the barrel bore, not parallel to the breech face. This means that the top of the grove is a lot deeper than the bottom.

At first, I tried to see if I can “split the difference” by shimming it just right, but obviously that won’t work:

Relum Telly new breech seal 1
The shimmed breech seal obviously isn’t going to work.

Eventually, the obvious solution hit me, and I cut a wedge-shaped washer out of semi-rigid tubing:

Relum Telly wedge washer
By cutting this washer on a bias, I got a wedge shape to lie under the new o-ring breech seal.

…and VOILA!

Relum Telly new breech seal 2
The wedge-shaped washer raised the new o-ring to be level with the slanted breech.

One final note: the gun shoots no faster with the new seal.

So there you have it, the Relum Telly in a nutshell. Cocking effort aside, it’s a decent little plinker. I’d say it’s easily the equal of a small Diana or Slavia in accuracy but superior in power. Granted, this pup ain’t gonna get shot very much — but at least in looks at home in my airgun rack:

Relum Telly airgun rack
The new Telly is near the right side of the top rack.

My New Relum Telly!
Not such a bad little felleee,
At least with the right pelleee…
My New Relum Telly!

And so, both my Telly review and brief poetical foray draw to a long-overdue conclusion.