by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo

Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo.

This report covers:

• Velocity baselining with Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Premier lite average for 5 pumps
• Premier lite average for 10 pumps
• Velocity baselining with Daisy BBs
• Daisy BB average for 5 pumps
• Daisy BB average for 10 pumps
• H&N Baracuda Match pellets with 4.50mm heads
• Gamo round lead ball
• Trigger-pull
• Evaluation so far

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo. I told you last time that the loading trough is narrow and difficult to access, and I tried to photograph it for you but was unable to get a picture that showed what I’m talking about. Just take my word that this rifle has much less access room than a Daisy 880 or a Crosman 2100.

I shot the rifle with pellets, BBs and lead balls, because I know some readers are interested in every type of ammo. In doing so, I learned some valuable lessons about this airgun! Let’s get started.

Velocity baselining with Crosman Premier lite pellets
I began the test with Crosman Premier lite pellets. I hoped to establish a baseline for velocity. But as you’ll see, it didn’t work the way I’d hoped.

Pumps     Velocity f.p.s.

2             270
3             383
4             434
5             473
6             478
7             500
8             532
9             540
10           552

Theoretically, the gun should average close to these velocities with the same number of pump strokes. However, as you’ll see, it didn’t.

Premier lite average for 5 pumps
The gun gave 473 f.p.s. with 5 pump strokes on the baseline test, so you’d think that would be close to the average of 10 shots, with 5 strokes each. And it was! The average for 10 shots with 5 pump strokes each was 471 f.p.s. But the velocity spread for those 10 shots ranged from a low of 444 f.p.s. to a high of 499 f.p.s. For a multi-pump pneumatic, that 65 f.p.s spread is huge! I normally see a 6 to 10 f.p.s. spread. At the average velocity, this pellet generates 3.94 foot-pounds on 5 pumps.

Premier lite average for 10 pumps
Here’s where the gun went out of parameters. On the first test, 10 pumps gave 552 f.p.s., so I expected the average for 10 shots with 10 pumps each to be pretty close. But it wasn’t. The average for 10 pump strokes was 577 f.p.s., which is a lot faster than expected. The low was 564 f.p.s. and the high was 588 f.p.s. So, even the slowest shot in this string was faster than the first shot on 10 pumps. Was the gun speeding up? It seemed so. At the average velocity, this pellet generated 5.84 foot-pounds at the muzzle on 10 pumps.

Velocity baselining with Daisy BBs
Next, I did the same baseline test with Daisy Premium Grade BBs. Here’s what they did:

Pumps       Velocity f.p.s.

2                   410
3                   483
4                   538
5                   579
6                   595
7                   637
8                   644
9                   660
10                 670

I look at this chart and see a typical performance curve for a multi-pump. Each early pump gives a lot more velocity increase, while later pumps add just a little. That’s characteristic of all the multi-pumps I’ve ever tested.

Daisy BB average for 5 pumps
Then, I tested a string of 10 shots with the same BBs, and the gun pumped 5 times for each shot. The average was 575 f.p.s., which is pretty close to what we see in the baseline string. The low was 570 f.p.s. and the high was 580 f.p.s., and that’s exactly what I expect to see from a multi-pump.

Daisy BB average for 10 pumps
With 10 pump strokes, Daisy BBs averaged 665 f.p.s. — again, very close to the baseline test. Maybe the rifle’s breaking in? The velocity went from a low of 649 f.p.s. to a high of 676 f.p.s. That’s a little high, but still better than we saw with the Premier lites on 5 pumps.

I loaded the BBs into the reservoir and fed them automatically as the bolt was worked. This went smoothly and only once did I have to jiggle the rifle a little to get a BB up on the bolt magnet. This is definitely the way to feed the gun when using BBs!

The rifle definitely seems to be breaking in with about 75 shots on it. It’ll probably be fully broken-in after 300 shots or so.

H&N Baracuda Match pellets with 4.50mm heads
Now, it was time to test the rifle with a heavier pellet. Pneumatics usually do better than spring guns with heavier pellets. With 5 pump strokes, the 10.65-grain H&N Baracuda Match pellet averaged 446 f.p.s. That translates to a muzzle energy of 4.71 foot-pounds, which is more than the Premier lite generated. On 10 strokes, Baracuda match pellets averaged 548 f.p.s. and generated 7.1 foot-pounds. So, performance is exactly as expected.

Gamo round lead ball
I tried Gamo round lead balls because I knew some readers would want it. And this is when I discovered that you don’t want to shoot round balls in this rifle. The balls often fall into the action because the loading trough is too narrow and you can’t place the ball directly into the trough. I lost several balls during this testing and almost had one fall into the BB magazine! I do not recommend loading anything but steel BBs and lead pellets in this rifle because you could jam the action.

But, I did finish the test, so let’s look at the numbers. On 5 pumps, I got an average 508 f.p.s. The low was 495 and the high was 521 f.p.s. At the average velocity, this ball generates 4.99 foot pounds at the muzzle. On 10 pumps, it averages 589 f.p.s with a spread from 572 to 607 f.p.s. At this speed, the 8.7-grain ball generates 6.7 foot-pounds.

Trigger-pull
The 2-stage trigger breaks very consistently at 5 lbs., 9 oz. That’s on the high side of normal, but it shouldn’t hinder accuracy.

Evaluation so far
So far, the Black Ops Junior Sniper has offered no real surprises. The powerplant behaves like any other inexpensive multi-pump. Loading is a chore unless you’re shooting BBs.