Some scope fundamentals: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This is one of the most popular reports I’ve done in a long time. That may be because scopes can be very cantankerous to deal with — hard to mount, difficult to zero, always seem to shift their zero, etc. Today, I’ll address some of the problems you can have and some ways to minimize them.

Scopes should work — no?
To the non-shooter, the telescopic sight seems like a guarantee of accuracy. We’ve all seen the movies. Put the crosshairs on the target, squeeze the trigger and you can’t miss.

Then, you try it for the first time, and you notice that you can’t keep the scope’s reticle (crosshairs) steady. As long as you hold the rifle, no matter what you do, the crosshairs move. Each beat of your heart makes them jump a little. Each breath you take in can move the scope or at least tilt it. You can minimize these movements through training, but nobody can eliminate them entirely. That’s why I shoot from a rest so often. But sometimes that doesn’t work — especially with spring-piston airguns. You have to learn the artillery hold; and since that technique goes well beyond what many people think, I’ll explain it more fully here.

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Some scope fundamentals: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

I’ve noticed that a lot of you are responding positively to the fundamentals that have come out in some of the recent reports, so I thought I would do a few more important ones for you, starting with scopes. This will be a series of bite-sized reports.

My experience shooting the Conquest with a 4x scope at 50 yards last week and getting great groups prompts me to want to share a number of scope evaluation tips with you. And, as always, I expect the comments from our readers are going to be even more interesting than the reports.

What magnification (power) to choose?
Starting with the Conquest accuracy test, it’s obvious that you don’t need a lot of magnification to shoot well. I normally use more than just 4x for a gun as accurate as the Conquest, but not on all rifles. As a scope increases in power, it also gets longer and heavier, so a compromise between power and size is usually best.

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Ruger Air Magnum Combo – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Photos and testing by Earl “Mac” McDonald

Part 1
Part 2

Hopefully, I’m getting this test finished in time for a few last-minute buying decisions for the holidays. I’m sorry it takes so long, but time being what it is, it’s the best I can do without turning this blog into an infomercial.

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy Mac was able to get from this powerful new ├╝bermagnum spring rifle. I know many of you were predicting it wouldn’t be very good, given the power output.

This is also the day when Mac will show you how to adjust the parallax of a fixed-parallax scope so you don’t have to buy a new scope to get what you want from the gun. Since that’s an interesting procedure, let’s do that first.

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