Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle
Ruger 10/22.

This report covers:

  • First try
  • Cartridge failed to pierce
  • Second try
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • RWS Hobby
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Shooting characteristics
  • The second time
  • After the first four strings
  • Velocity with bolt cocked versus just trigger pulled?
  • Magazine worked easy
  • Trigger pull
  • Next
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity and power of the new Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle. The rifle takes two 12-gram CO2 cartridges, so they went in first.

First try

On my first try I got a total of about 22 powerful shots before the velocity started dropping linearly. I won’t give the velocities, because they aren’t representative. But I will tell you that I got velocities that were just as high on this try as on the next one.

Cartridge failed to pierce

With a shot count that low I knew what had happened. One of the two cartridges had failed to pierce. The rifle was running on a single cartridge. In the beginning that doesn’t make any difference, as CO2 is a self-regulating gas, But you do run out of gas sooner, which is exactly what happened. read more


Hatsan Proxima underlever repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Proxima
Hatsan Proxima underlever repeater.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Why no single-shot tray
  • RWS Hobby
  • Teaching point
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Superdome
  • H&N Sniper Magnum
  • Discussion
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Why no single-shot tray

I am usually sensitive to the questions of my readers, but in Part 1 I missed it completely. Reader HawkEye asked why the Hatsan Proxima doesn’t come with a single shot tray. I ignored his first comment, thinking he was just joking, but he persisted so I finally answered him. I said this.

“This rifle isn’t made to be shot single shot. No tray because it doesn’t work that way. Cocking is too hard and the loading space too confined.”

And I wondered why he would even ask such a question, until it dawned on me that he couldn’t envision the scale. I had shown him an enlarged picture of the feed probe and, looking at that, he could see plenty of room to load a pellet. read more


Tuning Michael’s Winchester 427: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
Michael’s Winchester 427 is a Diana model 27 by another name. The rifle pictured is my Hy Score 807/Diana 27.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Recap
  • Tune in a Tube
  • But the rear sight…
  • The rifle is fixed!
  • Breech seal shim
  • Pivot bolt locking screw
  • Accuracy
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • RWS Hobby
  • Then I read…
  • Michael’s rifle is accurate
  • The big surprise!
  • Next

Today was a long time coming — much longer than I anticipated. But I learned a lot about problems with the Diana 27 that I have never encountered before, and I now believe I can tune one with ease.

Recap

Just so you remember, I am tuning reader Michael’s Winchester 427 that is a Diana 27 by another name. It looked good on the outside, apart from missing things like the rubber button on the butt and a locking screw for the pivot bolt. The rear sight was a kluge of backwoods “repairs”, but that didn’t impress me until the very end of the job. In fact, I will tell you now that I should have started there first. It was the main source of the rifle’s issues. read more


Webley Mark VI service revolver with battlefield finish: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Webley Mark VI
Webley Mark VI service revolver with battlefield finish. This one is rifled and shoots pellets.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Adjusted sight picture
  • Why not fix the front sight?
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • H&N Finale Match High Speed pellets
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Next — more sight corrections
  • Summary

Today I test the accuracy of the Webley Mark VI with battlefield finish. I decided to test it with all 5 pellets that were used in the velocity test.

The test

I shot from 10 meters, using a sandbag rest for the butt of the revolver. I held the gun with two hands for a steady hold. I shot 6 pellets at each target and I will describe what happened as we go. Let’s get started.

JSB Exact RS

The first pellet I tested was the JSB Exact RS. The first three shots landed low, with one below the target paper. The group had to come up somehow. read more


Crosman’s Mark I Target pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman Mark I
Crosman Mark I target pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Hobby pellets
  • Crosman Premiers
  • RWS Superpoint
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Crosman Mark I Target pistol. After adjusting the trigger in Part two, I feel confident it won’t let me down.

The test

I put in a fresh 12-gram CO2 cartridge. We learned in Part 2 that there are around 45 full-power shots in a cartridge and I plan to shoot less than that in today’s test. I will shoot a 5-shot group on high power and a second 5-shot group on low power with each pellet. That’s 10 shots per pellet times 3 pellets is a total of 30 shots. The range is 10 meters and the gun is rested directly on a sandbag. Let’s go. read more


Air Venturi Nomad II air compressor: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Nomad II air compressor
Air Venturi Nomad II air compressor.

This report covers:

  • AirForce Extra Air Tank
  • Time test
  • Two tests
  • Test one
  • Filling the tank
  • Dumped the air
  • Fill from a car battery
  • Thank you — battery makers
  • Second fill
  • Summary

Today I will test the Air Venturi Nomad II air compressor for you. In Part 1 I filled a BSA R10 Black Wrap rifle from empty in about 8 minutes. That gun takes a 232 bar fill, which is 3,365 psi. Today I will do something different.

AirForce Extra Air Tank

I chose an AirForce Extra Air Tank as my test tank for today’s work. The current tanks on AirForce airguns do not have to be taken off the guns to be filled, but the older-style tanks did. I’m doing this for the convenience of not needing to find a place to rest a whole airgun.

I used the tank from my 2001 AirForce TalonSS. That tank had been holding 3,000 psi for at least the past 5 years and was still completely full, so I had to attach an old-style refill adaptor to exhaust all the air. To do that I put three pennies into the adaptor before attaching the tank. The pennies push the valve cap down as the tank and adaptor are screwed together, to release the air in the same way the gun’s striker does it, only the pennies hold the valve open as long as you desire. In this case it was until the tank was empty. read more


Webley Service Mark II: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service rifle
Webley Mark II Service Rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

Today’s report is another in the series I did on the Webley Mark II Service rifle. Today’s post is by reader RidgeRunner, who now owns the rifle. He tells us about his rifle’s performance after the maintenance he reported in Part 6.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, take it away, RidgeRunner.

This report covers:

  • A Round Tuit
  • My Chrony Rig
  • Into The Breech!
  • RWS Super H-Point
  • Eley Wasp
  • H&N Sniper Light
  • H&N Field Target
  • JSB Exact Jumbo RS
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Crosman Premier Hollow Point
  • H&N Baracuda Hunter Extreme
  • H&N Baracuda
  • Summary

A Round Tuit

round tuit

Well, it took me a while to get to this, but now that I have a round tuit I can start doing the velocity test on this old gal. Since I spent most of a warm, calm, sunny Sunday shooting this air rifle, you might want to make sure you have a full cup of coffee before you go much further. read more