Webley Mark VI service revolver with battlefield finish: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Webley Mark VI
Webley Mark VI service revolver with battlefield finish. This one is rifled and shoots pellets.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Adjusted sight picture
  • Why not fix the front sight?
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • H&N Finale Match High Speed pellets
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Next — more sight corrections
  • Summary

Today I test the accuracy of the Webley Mark VI with battlefield finish. I decided to test it with all 5 pellets that were used in the velocity test.

The test

I shot from 10 meters, using a sandbag rest for the butt of the revolver. I held the gun with two hands for a steady hold. I shot 6 pellets at each target and I will describe what happened as we go. Let’s get started.

JSB Exact RS

The first pellet I tested was the JSB Exact RS. The first three shots landed low, with one below the target paper. The group had to come up somehow. read more


Crosman’s Mark I Target pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman Mark I
Crosman Mark I target pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Hobby pellets
  • Crosman Premiers
  • RWS Superpoint
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Crosman Mark I Target pistol. After adjusting the trigger in Part two, I feel confident it won’t let me down.

The test

I put in a fresh 12-gram CO2 cartridge. We learned in Part 2 that there are around 45 full-power shots in a cartridge and I plan to shoot less than that in today’s test. I will shoot a 5-shot group on high power and a second 5-shot group on low power with each pellet. That’s 10 shots per pellet times 3 pellets is a total of 30 shots. The range is 10 meters and the gun is rested directly on a sandbag. Let’s go. read more


Air Venturi Nomad II air compressor: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Nomad II air compressor
Air Venturi Nomad II air compressor.

This report covers:

  • AirForce Extra Air Tank
  • Time test
  • Two tests
  • Test one
  • Filling the tank
  • Dumped the air
  • Fill from a car battery
  • Thank you — battery makers
  • Second fill
  • Summary

Today I will test the Air Venturi Nomad II air compressor for you. In Part 1 I filled a BSA R10 Black Wrap rifle from empty in about 8 minutes. That gun takes a 232 bar fill, which is 3,365 psi. Today I will do something different.

AirForce Extra Air Tank

I chose an AirForce Extra Air Tank as my test tank for today’s work. The current tanks on AirForce airguns do not have to be taken off the guns to be filled, but the older-style tanks did. I’m doing this for the convenience of not needing to find a place to rest a whole airgun.

I used the tank from my 2001 AirForce TalonSS. That tank had been holding 3,000 psi for at least the past 5 years and was still completely full, so I had to attach an old-style refill adaptor to exhaust all the air. To do that I put three pennies into the adaptor before attaching the tank. The pennies push the valve cap down as the tank and adaptor are screwed together, to release the air in the same way the gun’s striker does it, only the pennies hold the valve open as long as you desire. In this case it was until the tank was empty. read more


Webley Service Mark II: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service rifle
Webley Mark II Service Rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

Today’s report is another in the series I did on the Webley Mark II Service rifle. Today’s post is by reader RidgeRunner, who now owns the rifle. He tells us about his rifle’s performance after the maintenance he reported in Part 6.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, take it away, RidgeRunner.

This report covers:

  • A Round Tuit
  • My Chrony Rig
  • Into The Breech!
  • RWS Super H-Point
  • Eley Wasp
  • H&N Sniper Light
  • H&N Field Target
  • JSB Exact Jumbo RS
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Crosman Premier Hollow Point
  • H&N Baracuda Hunter Extreme
  • H&N Baracuda
  • Summary

A Round Tuit

round tuit

Well, it took me a while to get to this, but now that I have a round tuit I can start doing the velocity test on this old gal. Since I spent most of a warm, calm, sunny Sunday shooting this air rifle, you might want to make sure you have a full cup of coffee before you go much further. read more


Crosman’s Mark I Target pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman Mark I
Crosman Mark I target pistol.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Loading the CO2 cartridge
  • O-ring material
  • Velocity
  • RWS Hobby
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Discussion
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today we look at the power of my Crosman Mark I Target pistol. This will be interesting because I don’t remember ever doing it. I probably did, but without a report to read I can’t remember.

Loading the CO2 cartridge

Usually on a CO2 pistol that stores the 12-gram CO2 cartridge in the grip, one of the grip panels comes off to remove and install the cartridge — the left one, more often than not. Not so with this pistol. Instead there is a large knurled cap at the bottom of the grip that is removed, and the cartridge inside slides out. If there is still significant gas in the gun, the pressure will force the o-ring in the cap to seal the cap tight and it may not rotate. Don’t use pliers to force it! Shoot the gun until the gas is gone or almost gone. read more


Benjamin 310 BB gun: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

A history of airguns

Benjamin 310
A Benjamin 310 multi-pump BB gun from 1952.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Hobbys
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Falcon
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today I test the Benjamin 310 BB gun with pellets. We learned in the test of BBs that the gun does like to shoot with the larger BBs. Let’s now find out how that translates to pellets.

The test

I shot the gun off a sandbag 10 meters from the target. I used the plus one pumping routine that worked so well for BBs. That works like this — the gun has air remaining from the previous shot and I pump one time after each shot. I get a stable velocity with that routine. Let’s see what she will do. read more


Air Venturi Seneca Aspen precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Seneca Aspen PCP
The Air Venturi Seneca Aspen precharged pneumatic air rifle.

This report covers:

  • Multi-pump
  • High power
  • Power
  • Coolest test
  • What you do
  • Low power with Kodiaks
  • Summary

Well, well. Lots of interest and discussion of the Air Venturi Seneca Aspen PCP with a built-in pump. As well there should be. This is a ground-breaking air rifle that offers many features never before seen. However, it has confused people a little. For example, many readers are focused on the “PCP” part of its title, when it is the multi-pump aspect that dominates.

Multi-pump

Did you notice that I never filled from a tank in Part 2? I won’t today, either, and today is a continuation of the velocity test. It just is not that convenient to use a tank for the few shots that you get. I will fill from a tank at some point, but that will be after I learn the power curves of the rifle. And I did say curves, with an “s,” because every pellet you use has the potential of changing the maximum and minimum optimum fill pressure slightly. read more