The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 12

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10
Part 11

Beeman P1.
Beeman P1 pistol.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight adjustments
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Crosman Premier Light
  • What is happening?
  • Discussion 2
  • Summary

Today we will look at the accuracy of the Beeman P1 pistol on high power with the UTG RDM20 Reflex Micro Dot sight that Pyramyd Air doesn’t currently stock. This sight is quite small and light and I thought it would be ideal for the P1, which we proved in Part 11, when the pistol was shot on low power. Today’s test on high power will test both the accuracy of the pistol as well as this sight’s ability to remain in one place. Dot sights that are larger have to be butted against the front sight to stay in place, but so far this one doesn’t have to be. read more


Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

This report covers:

  • The Whiskey3 reticle
  • The test
  • Couldn’t get the rifle to group!
  • The double group
  • Sandbag rest
  • Wraith Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • I can do this!
  • Air Arms domes
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Last group
  • Summary

Today I start looking critically at the accuracy of the new Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle. Until now I have only shot 5-shot groups. They are okay for quick work but do not tell the whole story. Today I will shoot 10-shot groups and we will learn the accuracy of this new rifle with some precision. I won’t get into the statistical reason that 10 shots are better than 5, but here is a good bottom line — anybody can get lucky, and it is far easier to do it 5 times in a row than 10.

The Whiskey3 reticle

Before we get into this test report, reader Bimjo asked this. read more


DIY Rifle Stock – Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier
Today’s report is Part 3 of reader Vana’s excellent report on stock making.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, over to you, Hank.

Part 1
Part 2

Slavia 618
This is my original 55 year old Slavia 618 in its new “firewood” stock. I made this one in a “camo” style, using cherry and maple blocks in a random arrangement of the pieces.

This report covers:

  • Parts of the hand
  • The model
  • Getting ready
  • About the grip
  • Carving the grip
  • The Try-Gun stock
  • Summary

Parts of the hand

parts of the hand
Legend: These are parts of the hand that I will reference in my discussion of the grip.

I made this legend so that it will be easier to follow my explanations. In the picture, my grip is relaxed and open so I can label the parts clearly. When actually holding the grip, my thumb (1st Digit) would wrap around the grip causing the Thenar region to move down to follow the top of the Palmar region perimeter (purple line), and the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers would be curled in more. read more


Tuning Michael’s Winchester 427: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
Michael’s Winchester 427 is a Diana model 27 by another name. The rifle pictured is my Hy Score 807/Diana 27

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Reader MarklinJHawkland
  • The blind pin
  • Sheared the screw
  • The lesson
  • Cleaning the spring tube
  • Other cleaning
  • The assembly
  • Summary

I’m tuning and overhauling reader Michael’s .22 caliber Diana 27, which is actually a Winchester 427. In Part one I disassembled it and in Part two I showed you how the ball bearing trigger works. In Part three I talked about removing the old piston seal that had a screw that was stuck. I have a lot more to say about that today.

Reader MarklinJHawkland
This is the reader who solved the puzzle. I knew there is a pin in the head of the piston, because when I disassembled the rifle someone had tapped that pin in far enough for me to see it. Unfortunately it was probably that and not the rust that had jammed the screw in place. read more


Best equipment or the best training?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Best equipment?
  • Why not cheap?
  • Airgunner’s dreams
  • Why?
  • One gun to rule them all
  • Thanks Hank
  • One final type of table saw
  • And one final airgun — is it a hybrid?
  • Summary

I almost titled today’s report as an open letter to the airgun industry, because I believe there is a lot for them in here. But there is also a lot for the average airgunner. Reader Vana should be flattered because his excellent report on stockmaking yesterday prompted all that I am about to say.

Best equipment?

As I read Vana’s report, I mused about making stocks myself. Like that will ever happen. It’s like watching a Fred Astair movie and deciding to take dance lessons, I guess. Only, when it comes to dancing, the movie I should watch is Godzilla.

But here is what I actually did. I went online and researched table saws. Yes, I really did! I discovered that table saws fall into several categories that range from cheap, through portable or jobsite, up to contractor and finally cabinet, which is the pinnacle. I discovered that I wanted to pay for a portable (usually under $400) but to get one with the features of a cabinet ($5,000 to $10,000). However I did not like the extreme weight of the cabinet models (450-600 lbs.) and wanted my saw to weigh more in the contractor range (225-250 lbs.). Hey! I’m an airgunner when it comes to table saws! read more


DIY Rifle Stock – Part 2

by Tom Gaylord

Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Today’s report is a continuation of reader Vana’s excellent report on stock making.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, over to you, Hank.

Slavia 618
This is my original 55 year old Slavia 618 in its new “firewood” stock. I made this one in a “camo” style, using cherry and maple blocks in a random arrangement of the pieces.

This report covers:

  • Stock Layout
  • Let’s get started!
  • Putting pencil to paper
  • Two approaches to stock making
  • Which way to go — subtractive or additive?
  • Before we start, tune your tablesaw!
  • The forend block
  • Machining the receiver mounting points
  • Bedding the receiver
  • Cutting out the spacer
  • About gluing…
  • The “spring retention cap” retainer
  • Cutting the forend profile
  • Summary

Stock Layout

Stock layout
This is the layout for a new Slavia 618 stock with all the important details drawn in.

I will be using datum points and datum planes to work from. These are the reference points and reference surfaces used to measure from, to locate features on our template and our material. All dimensions are taken from the datums. The stock mounting holes are ideal datum points and I will use the top edge of the original stock for my datum plane. In this instance we will use them to relate the features on the receiver to the stock. read more


Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

This report covers:

  • Air Arms domes
  • A different rest
  • The artillery hold
  • Screamer!
  • Another pellet
  • Final group — confirmation
  • Summary

In the last report I cleaned the barrel of the Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle and showed you there are no real baffles to worry about. Today I want to test the rifle to see whether cleaning has changed the accuracy in any way. I also want to test the rifle resting directly on a sandbag versus using the artillery hold. I will also try some different pellets, to see if there is more potential accuracy. It should be a good test, so let’s get started.

I’m shooting 5-shot groups today because I’m still learning things about the airgun. Five-shot groups allow me to test more things. read more