by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Gamo Urban
Gamo Urban.

This report covers:

  • Fill probe
  • Pellets
  • Shot count
  • Air Arms Diabolo Field
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 5.51mm heads
  • Evaluation
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the .22 caliber Gamo Urban. And the first string will be an interesting test, because I know the Urban is a BSA design. BSA PCPs do not use their air the same as other precharged air rifles. The Urban fills to 232 bar, which is 3365 psi. Normally that would present a challenge to anyone wanting to use a hand pump, because pumping to that pressure level is difficult for most adults. But testing done by Tyler Patner (watch his video on the Urban webpage) confirmed what I suspected from the start — the BSA-based powerplant in the Urban doesn’t use the pressure above 3000 psi efficiently. It only becomes smooth when the pressure drops below 3,000 psi — the same as the BSA Hornet I used to own. Tyler found the best string of shots was between 2900 psi and 1500 psi. If I find the test rifle performs similarly I will constrain all my tests to that lower maximum pressure. It won’t make much difference at 25 yards, but it will at 50.

Fill probe

The Urban fill probe is a proprietary size that’s smaller than many other probes. A a result, only the Urban probe will work, and I had to dismantle another hose to set it up. I would have liked to use the probe I use with Korean PCPs and Hatsans, but their probe did not enter the fill port. Better still, Gamo could start using the male Foster fitting that most PCPs use today and there would be no problem.

Pellets

One reader already said his Urban does best with soft lead pellets, So I will start the test with H&N Sniper Light pellets that weigh 14 grains. For this first test I filled the rifle to 232 bar/3365 psi.

Shot.………….Vel.
1………………821
2………………827
3………………813
4………………809
5………………831
6………………829
7………………829
8………………831
9………………830
10.…………….840
11.…………….DNR (did not register)
12.…………….844
13.…………….841
14.…………….837
15.…………….852 3000 psi on rifle’s gauge
16.…………….850
17.…………….855
18.…………….838
19.…………….852
20.…………….861
21.…………….846
22.…………….855
23.…………….836
24.…………….857
25.…………….DNR
26.…………….855
27.…………….868
28.…………….862
29.…………….856
30.…………….866
31.…………….855
32.…………….858
33.…………….842 2000 psi on rifle’s gauge
34.…………….860
35.…………….851
36.…………….850
37.…………….845
38.…………….843
39.…………….842
40.…………….822 1500 psi on rifle’s gauge
41.…………….819
42.…………….813
43.…………….801
44.…………….789
45.…………….768

Here is how I interpret this string. First, the fill of 232 bar/3365 psi is too much for this particular rifle. However, this one will handle a little more than 3,000 psi. Maybe you are safe at 3100 psi. I will fill to 3,000 for the rest of this test and leave it at that.

Shot count

From 3,000 psi, which is shot 15, down to shot 39 ( just over 1500 psi), the rifle gives a spread of 32 f.p.s. (low of 836 on shot 23 and a high of 868 on shot 27). That’s 25 good shots, based on what I’m calling good. However, you can see there are at least another 5 good shots that exist before the string I’m choosing. So, when you take this rifle to the field, fill it to 3100 psi and shoot 3 full magazines.

Gamo and Pyramyd Air both say the Urban gets 800 f.p.s., but the test rifle is clearly much hotter than that. They also say to expect about 30 shots per fill, which is exactly what I saw in this test. So far so good.

If you accept my arbitrary string of 25 shots (shot 15 to shot 39), the average velocity for this pellet is 852 f.p.s. At that speed it generates 22.57 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle. Now let’s test something different.

Air Arms Diabolo Field

Next I tested Air Arms Diabolo Field pellets. These domes weigh 16 grains. I filled the rifle to 3000 psi for this string and the next one.

This pellet averaged 807 f.p.s. in the Urban. The spread went from a low of 804 to a high of 810 f.p.s. That’s just 6 f.p.s., which is pretty good!

At the average velocity they generated 23.14 foot-pounds at the muzzle. As you can see, a heavier pellet usually generates more power in a PCP.

H&N Baracuda Match with 5.51mm heads

The last pellet I tested was the H&N Baracuda Match with 5.51mm head. These heavyweights weigh 21.14 grains in .22 caliber, so they should produce the most energy of all. And they do.

They averaged 707 f.p.s. in the Urban with a 12 f.p.s. spread from 703 to 715 f.p.s. At the average velocity they produced 23.47 foot-pounds at the muzzle. That’s ever-so-slightly more powerful than the lighter Air Arms pellets.

Evaluation

The Urban is a 22-25 foot-pound air rifle that gets 30 good shots per fill. I wouldn’t fill above 3100 psi, because you gain very little.

The magazine functioned well during this test, hanging up just once when a damaged pellet snagged the mechanism. I was able to remove the mag and clear the jam without a problem. I also enjoyed how easily the mag can be removed and inserted.

The rifle does not stop shooting when the mag runs out of pellets. You need to watch for the white dot to appear.

I must say that the Urban’s bolt cocks smoothly and it reasonably light. It’s a winner in the price point PCP world.

Trigger pull

The 2-stage trigger breaks at 2 lbs. 3 oz. The second stage has travel that can be felt, but there’s no real creep, which is a jerky start/stop in the movement.

Summary

It looks like Gamo has given us a good PCP in the price-point category. It has different features, but it’s reasonably lightweight and handy to use. The trigger looks good, too.

If the Urban tests well in the accuracy test, it will be a winner.