Diana Bandit PCP air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Bandit
Diana Bandit precharged pneumatic air pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

    • Filled to 200 bar
    • Not able to adjust the rear sight
    • The test
    • Superdomes first
    • UTG Micro Reflex dot sight
    • Take rear sight off
    • Hades pellets at 200 bar
    • 180-bar Hades target
    • 170-bar Hades target
    • Is the sight mounted tightly?
    • How is the gun rested?
    • Ah HA!
    • Oh, well
    • Final target — Meisterkugeln
    • Discussion
    • Summary

    Today we look at the accuracy of the Diana Bandit PCP air pistol, and I have to tell you that it’s just a first look. This gun took a LOT of work to get it to shoot!

    Filled to 200 bar

    I re-read Part 2 and saw that the .22-caliber Bandit that I’m testing, as it comes from the factory, only gets 7 or 8 good shots per fill. I also saw that a 200-bar fill is probably too high but I didn’t have much to go on, other than the customer comments that seem to agree. Many who gave the pistol a high rating say they had to back off on the fill pressure to get any accuracy. read more


What does the new year hold?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • What the new year holds
  • Big bores
  • High-tech projectiles
  • Price point PCPs (PPP)
  • Basic features of a PPP
  • Things that are good to have
  • Kiss of death for a PPP
  • Horsepower wars over?
  • Optics
  • Electronics in scopes
  • Scope mounts
  • Air compressors
  • Replica airguns
  • A dual-power spring-piston breakbarrel
  • M16 replica
  • M1 Garand replica
  • Summary

Happy New Year! May 2020 be a year of vision for all of you!

What the new year holds

I know a lot of you are trying to peek behind the curtain, to see what’s coming down the line. Some writers will divulge things, but I won’t. I would rather wait and see how something is presented before I announce it to the world.

But that doesn’t mean I don’t know some of the things that are coming. Today I would like to share a glimpse into the coming year with some things I know and also the trends I see unfolding. Let’s go!

Big bores

The coming year will be a hot one for big bore airguns. Expect to see muzzle energy over 800 foot-pounds, and this year it will be in actual production guns — not those that have been held up for scrutiny but have never quite made it to production. read more


What about dry-firing?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • History
  • Luger
  • Soviet SKS
  • One more common problem
  • Designed to be dry-fired
  • Airguns
  • BB — get real!
  • Sillyiess
  • And the others?
  • Under The Gun
  • An aside that is pertinent
  • Pneumatics and gas guns
  • BB’s rule of thumb
  • Summary

Time for another basic report. We discuss dry-firing airguns a lot and things get out of control pretty quick, but I guess that’s the nature of the Internet. My wife, Edith, used to have a little saying about it. She said people would post:

“I have an HW77 that I enjoy.”

“Yes, Weihrauch airguns all nice, aren’t they?”

“I shoot my Gamo Expomatic in the basement every day.”

“I like ice cream!”

I’ll come back to that, but today I thought I would dive into the subject of dry-firing a little deeper, since it’s one that seems to affect all of us to some extent. I think I’ll start with firearms. read more


Diana Bandit PCP air pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Bandit
Diana Bandit precharged pneumatic air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Bandit
  • Customer reviews
  • The case
  • Description
  • Weight
  • Power
  • Sights
  • Magazine
  • Trigger
  • The point
  • Fill coupling
  • Discharge sound
  • Free-floated barrel
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the Diana Bandit precharged pneumatic (PCP) air pistol. It is the pistol equivalent to the Diana Stormrider rifle.

Bandit

The Diana Bandit is a repeating PCP pistol that comes in both .177 and .22 caliber. It has a circular spring-loaded magazine that holds 9 pellets in .177 and 7 in .22. I selected a .22 for my test.

Customer reviews

I read some of the customer reviews of the gun before examining it. It seems to me there are two main camps that purchase a pistol like this. One camp buys it based in the price. It’s everything they want in a Benjamin Marauder PCP air pistol (they hope) for $190 less. The other camp buys the pistol to modify it into something they really want. First they have to fix all the things that Diana got wrong when they designed the airgun, like not putting in a regulator, then they move on to accurizing it with other barrels and exotic sights. read more


Onyx Tactical Crossbow: Part 1

nyby Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sen-X Crossbow
Onyx Tactical Crossbow.

This report covers:

  • Crossbow
  • The Onyx
  • Physical specifications and description
  • Who needs it?
  • So — who needs it?
  • Why you need it
  • Opening the box
  • Manual
  • The power source — for cocking
  • Why CO2?
  • Air source safety
  • The button
  • Final point
  • Summary

Today will be a completely different blog! This time old BB is the student. This is about a crossbow, which I do know a little about, but this crossbow operates differently than any other.

Crossbow

The Onyx Tactical Crossbow is a crossbow like all other premium crossbows, except for one thing. You cock this bow with the push of a button! Yes, this 225-pound draw-weight crossbow that is fully capable of taking big game is cocked with the push of a button. Let’s think about that for a moment.

Crossbows are to archers what rifles are to spear-throwers. They remove most of the skill required for the job and deliver powerful shots that are also accurate out to ranges that even experienced archers cannot achieve. It’s been that way for centuries, and for all of that time the longbow archers have insisted that crossbows are not true bows. I have to agree with them. A longbow is one thing — even when it has modern technology like sights and cams to reduce draw weight — things that weren’t around when this controversy started. read more


Omega Supercharger

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is written by reader Ian McKee, writing as 45Bravo.

The world is shifting over to precharged pneumatics (PCP) in a big way, and that means more of us are needing compressed air. 45Bravo got an Omega Supercharger air compressor that had a couple issues from just sitting around. Today he tells us what he did.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, over to you, 45Bravo.

Omega Supercharger
Omega Supercharger.

This report covers:

  • It works-sort of
  • Talk to Todd
  • Bag O’ Spares
  • Progress
  • Photos
  • Basic trouble shooting
  • No lights
  • The lights are on, but the compressor won’t start
  • Compressor not building pressure
  • Pressure gauge/auto shutoff
  • Bleed valve service
  • Water pump not working
  • Air/water separator auto purge system
  • The main piston assembly
  • Maintenance

So, you bought a PCP compressor that has been sitting in a closet for 4 years, what should you do? That’s exactly where I found myself. read more


Keep it simple

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Impossible dream
  • B-I-L
  • Bottom line?
  • Keep it simple
  • My choices
  • The wrong question
  • Requirements pile on
  • Look for positive features
  • TX200 Mark III
  • What not to do
  • Did I succeed?

Today I have an early holiday gift for you. No, it’s not an airgun. This gift is much more valuable than just an airgun, and you can use it for the rest of your life. Today I am going to tell you how to decide on something and always be happy with your decision.

Impossible dream

I get emails from my own website, www.godfatherofairguns.com all the time asking questions that belong on this blog, but seldom ever make it here. I think the main reason they don’t is the person asking the question knows the answer and doesn’t want all of you telling him what he already knows. And this is one-hundred percent a guy thing. Women do ask me questions from time to time, but they always seem to accept the answer I give. read more