Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE.

This report covers:

  • Eun Jin pellets
  • Predator Polymag pellets
  • JSB Exact King pellets
  • Bottom line

This is the final test of the Hatsan BT65 QE. I’ve enjoyed working with this rifle. Once I got the silencer issue sorted, the gun became quite accurate. Today, I’ll try some other pellets, and I’ll also try a group at 100 yards. The silencer parts are still out of the shroud, so there’s nothing to hinder the flight of each pellet.

Eun Jin pellets

I tried the 35.8-grain .25-caliber Eun Jin dome first. Because of the rotary magazine, I was concerned this long pellet might not fit, but it did. It fit fine. And it cycled through the action without a fault. But accuracy was a different story. read more


Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE.

This report covers:

  • First group
  • Problem solved
  • A good start
  • Benjamin domed pellets
  • Beeman Kodiak Match pellets
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Back to the JSB pellets
  • What about the silencer?
  • Conclusions

I’ve wanted to get back to this .25-caliber Hatsan BT65 QE for a long time. Today, I’ll tell you what happened. I wasn’t satisfied in part 3 that I was seeing the best accuracy this rifle could produce at 50 yards, even though there were some okay 9-shot groups. This big PCP has the reputation for shooting better than it did, and I wanted to see that; so I removed all the silencer parts and went back to the range.

Over the years, I’ve had problems with airgun silencers — starting with a Daystate Mirage in the late 1990s that just didn’t hold up at 50 yards. When its silencer was removed, that rifle suddenly tightened up and shot like it was supposed to; and that’s what made me aware that airgun silencers are tricky things. When they work, they do so beautifully, and you never know they’re there. But if anything touches the pellet before it leaves the muzzle, all accuracy is destroyed. read more


Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE air rifle

This report covers:

  • Uh-oh!
  • Shooting dynamic
  • Benjamin domed pellets
  • JSB King pelletss
  • Tried the solid bullet
  • The plan

I have quite a report for you today on the accuracy of the .25-caliber Hatsan BT65 QE precharged air rifle. This is a rifle I’ve long wanted to test because of its reputation for power and accuracy at a great price. Twenty-five caliber air rifles have become legitimate hunting guns over the past decade, mostly because of the improvements in pellets. It’s now worthwhile to think of a .25 instead of a .22 if all you want to do is hunt.

Uh-oh!

I actually went to the range a week earlier to test the rifle, but no matter which pellet I tried, the best it would do was about 5 inches at 50 yards. This rifle is really too powerful to test inside my house, so I skipped any 25-yard testing. Pellet after pellet went into large groups. I felt there had to be something wrong with the test rifle. Rather than report on a failure at the range, I contacted Hatsan, which sent me a link to one of Rick Eutsler’s videos on improving the accuracy of the rifle. After watching that video, I removed the barrel from the rifle and found that its crown had some damage. read more


Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE air rifle

This report covers:

• How quiet?
• Stronger pellet trap
• Fills with a probe!
• First pellet — Benjamin domes
• Let’s talk
• You make the call
• Next up — the JSB Exact King pellets
• Beeman Kodiak pellets
• Bullets
• Trigger-pull

How quiet?
I felt like a new airgunner because I didn’t know what to expect from the .25-caliber BT65 QE air rifle. I was planning on taking it to the range the next morning, but if I could shoot it safely in my office without blowing out the windows, I could save some range time that was sorely needed for other tests. It all came down to just how quiet this Quiet Energy precharged pneumatic really was. read more


Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE air rifle

This report covers:

• Today’s rifle is different
• BT65 rifle specs
• Let’s talk price
• Quattro trigger
• Automatic safety
• Circular clip
• My plans for this test

Okay, back to work. Let’s start a look at Hatsan’s powerful precharged pneumatic air rifle (PCP) — the BT65 QE. I know this rifle has been out there awhile, but I just reviewed the AT44-10 Long QE last July, so I’m slow all around. That rifle was so accurate at 50 yards that I took it out to 100 yards — something I seldom do.

Today’s rifle is different
But today’s rifle is different. It looks very similar to the AT44-10, and it’s a 9-shot repeater (in .25 caliber, 10 in .177 and .22). But the BT65 is more powerful. It’s also very long, though that adjective is missing from the title. In short — this is the big one. I ordered it in .25 caliber because I have something special I want to do with it. But more on that later. read more