How does a scope work?

by B.B. Pelletier

Before we start, a little announcement. Many of you are already aware of this, but Pyramyd Air has purchased the assets of Compasseco, a Kentucky-based airgun dealership with strong ties to Chinese airguns. In fact, Compasseco could be said to be the company that helped guide Chinese airgun makers into the modern American airgun market.

Pyramyd Air plans on keeping the Compasseco warehouse for the foreseeable future, and they plan on continuing the sales and support of Compasseco-branded guns, especially those under the Tech Force brand name. Now, on to today’s report.

I wanted to subtitle this report “A look at the inside” because today I’m going to show you the inside of most scopes. It just happens to be on the outside of the scope I just mounted on my .43 Spanish Remington Rolling Block rifle, which affords me an excellent opportunity to show you how scope adjustments work.

read more


The Umarex Steel Storm – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier


Another BB submachine gun: the Umarex Steel Storm has a different set of features and offers a lot at a competitive price.

When I review a vintage airgun, we always get a lot of comments about this and that. Apparently, a lot of you like seeing the guns of yesteryear. Sometimes, the gun is one that not too many of you know, and that’s a lot of fun…learning about something for the first time.

Then, when I review a contemporary airgun in the expensive class, we get a lot of comments from readers who always wondered this or that about the model but never had the opportunity to see one for themselves. It’s nice to have an expensive product laid out for you, warts (if any) and all so you can evaluate what might be a major purchase.

read more


H&K MP5 K-PDW CO2-powered BB gun – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


Umarex HKMP5-K-PDW is a lightweight, handy BB-firing semiauto.

Well, now that I’ve shot the HK MP5 K-PDW, I have a greater appreciation of what it is and how it functions. The stock removal required to replace the CO2 cartridge is troublesome but not time-consuming. However, while I was shooting, the CO2 started to leak, causing me to have to tighten up the screw that puts tension on the CO2 cartridge. This is the first time I’ve ever had to do this in tens of thousands of CO2 cartridges, and it was unexpected, except that I read about it in the customer reviews when they rated the gun. So, I suspect this behavior is common to this gun.

read more


B.B.’s airguns – What I kept and why – Part 4

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Crosman 180
We’re getting down pretty far into BB’s gun closet now, so we should start to see some strange things. The first of these may surprise you by its simplicity. It is a humble .22 caliber Crosman 180 single-shot rifle. I bought this rifle at a flea market about 15 years ago. It was one of two guns I bought, the other being a .177 caliber model 187. I paid $40 for the pair and then sold the 187 for $100 at the next airgun show I attended, because the 187 is considered to be pretty scarce.


Crosman’s model 180 was a lightweight, single-shot, bolt-action .22 caliber pellet rifle that existed as the inexpensive cousin to Crosman’s model 160 target rifle.

read more


H&K MP5 K-PDW CO2-powered BB gun – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier


Umarex HKMP5-K-PDW is a lightweight, handy BB-firing semiauto.

A real BB gun
At the SHOT Show this year, I was surprised in the Umarex booth by the appearance of a BB gun that looked for all the world like an airsoft automatic electric gun (AEG). One big clue that the HK MP5-K PDW is not an airsoft gun is the lack of an orange muzzle, which is required by law for all airsoft guns sold in the United States, but is not relevant to BB guns.

Let’s be clear about the definition of a BB gun right now. I am talking about a gun that shoots steel BBs — not the 6mm plastic balls that Asian manufacturers call BBs. Those guns are airsoft guns, not BB guns.

read more


How many shots per fill? It depends…

by B.B. Pelletier

I was reading a mystery novel the other day and the cop asked his friend if he had collected all the floppy disks when he got the computer. Floppy disks!

I remember floppy disks and some that we called floppy disks that were smaller and no longer floppy, but hearing something like that out of the blue, or reading it in my case, is like watching a modern movie in which the hero can’t locate a public phone to call for help. What? He doesn’t have a cell phone? Well, no, in 1977, he doesn’t. In a very brief number of years we have become so familiar with ubiquitous cell phones, that to not have them seems very odd.

read more


A shrine built for a Feinwerkbau 124 – Part 9

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 8
Part 7
Part 6
Part 5
Part 4
Part 3
Part 2
Part 1

Getting ready to test
Today, I want to mount a scope on the 124 to get ready for the long-range accuracy test. Normally, I would just mount the scope and gloss over it in the report, because scope mounting is usually not a big deal; but the 124 is a special airgun that needs special scope mounting considerations. So, I’m making a separate report about it.

A strange scope stop
What makes the 124 special is the way Feinwerkbau went about providing a scope stop. You must understand that Feinwerkbau is a target gun company. They understand rear aperture sights very well, but they don’t appreciate scope sights nearly as well. And, in the 1970s — when the 124 came out — scope mounting was still very new to the hobby. They provided a scope stop system that works well for rear aperture sights but not so easy when working with scopes.

read more