A shrine built for a Feinwerkbau 124 – Part 11

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 10
Part 9
Part 8
Part 7
Part 6
Part 5
Part 4
Part 3
Part 2
Part 1

Well, here is our old friend, the San Anselmo Beeman 124, again. Today, I’ll address the scope problems I was having the last time I tested the rifle for accuracy.

You may recall that I suggested that the front and rear rings be swapped to see if that would alter the amount of down angle the rifle appears to have. One reader was appalled that anything manufactured could be that far off from true, but believe me, it doesn’t take much. I’ve seen this trick work many times in the past. However, I failed to mention that three inches is a bit excessive to try to correct this way. This trick is more for those who optically center their scope and have a half-inch problem at the first point of intersection.

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A shrine built for a Feinwerkbau 124 – Part 9

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 8
Part 7
Part 6
Part 5
Part 4
Part 3
Part 2
Part 1

Getting ready to test
Today, I want to mount a scope on the 124 to get ready for the long-range accuracy test. Normally, I would just mount the scope and gloss over it in the report, because scope mounting is usually not a big deal; but the 124 is a special airgun that needs special scope mounting considerations. So, I’m making a separate report about it.

A strange scope stop
What makes the 124 special is the way Feinwerkbau went about providing a scope stop. You must understand that Feinwerkbau is a target gun company. They understand rear aperture sights very well, but they don’t appreciate scope sights nearly as well. And, in the 1970s — when the 124 came out — scope mounting was still very new to the hobby. They provided a scope stop system that works well for rear aperture sights but not so easy when working with scopes.

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BKL rings – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 2
Part 1


The BKL 260 mount we’ve been testing.

This test has taken an inordinate amount of time, primarily because of my illness and some other pressing matters. We’re testing the BKL 260 mount to determine if its clamping pressure is good enough to prevent movement under recoil without a positive recoil stop.

In the last report, I tested the mount on a Hammerli Razor, a standard sporter spring rifle, and it held up fine. Over 500 shots later, it didn’t move. I’d planned to do a similar test on a Webley Patriot, which is the same as a Beeman Kodiak, but as the test drew near I decided that 500 shots were unnecessary — 100 shots would be sufficient. The Patriot/Kodiak is a spring-powered jackhammer that will move or break a scope in very few shots. Today’s test will demonstrate that. Mac switched the scope from the Hammerli Razor to the Webley Patriot generously provided by AirForce Airguns owner John McCaslin. Though this is a .177 caliber rifle, it still has all of the heavy recoil characteristics of the type.

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