Tuning BB’s Diana 27: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Teardown
  • 25 years?
  • Krytox!
  • Petroleum archaeology!
  • Grease to oil
  • Spring is fully scragged
  • Grease formed plugs and solidified
  • Start cleaning
  • Removing the barrel
  • Surprise!
  • Piston out
  • And rust!
  • Diana peened the blind pin in the piston head!
  • Cleaning done, time for the Krytox
  • Lubed the mainspring
  • Assembly
  • The rest of the parts go in
  • Finishing assembly
  • The verdict
  • Did I do it wrong?
  • What should I do now?
  • Don’tcha wanna know how it works?
  • RWS Superpoint
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Summary

Today is the day we learn whether Krytox is the miracle lubricant that both fixes and quiets spring-piston airguns. I have been hounded by people for more than a decade to try this stuff, and I had dug my heels in real deep, but then it dawned on me that Gene from Pyramyd Air had been after me for an equally long time to try Almagard 3752 — the grease that turned out to be Tune in a Tube. We all know how that went!

I promised to become the number one Krytox cheerleader if the stuff really works as advertised — by some airgunners, not by Krytox, themselves. But, I will also be only too happy to poke a hole in the Krytox balloon if it turns out we have been hoodwinked. read more


BSF S54 Match rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSF S54
BSF S54 target rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • Resting on the sandbag
  • Artillery hold off hand extended
  • Discussion
  • Adjusted the rear sight
  • Falcon pellets
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • JSB Exact RS domes
  • H&N Finale Match High Speed target pellet
  • Something extra
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the BSF S54 Match rifle. Now, while this rifle is called a Match rifle and did come with a large aperture sight, it’s not a serious match rifle and never was. Sometimes I have guys ask me questions like, “Could it be used in a match?” and I have to answer, “Yes” but they don’t let me finish by saying, “… but it will never win!” You see, some guys are so enraptured by the design of the S54 Match (and that huge rear aperture!) that they want it to be a real match rifle. Other guys own one and don’t want to spend the money for something different. The bottom line is — The BSF S54 Match rifle is not for formal competition! I think you will see that today. read more


BSF S54 Match rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSF S54
BSF S54 target rifle.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • A little more of the BSF Story
  • Today
  • Front sight
  • BINK!
  • Velocity
  • Superpoints for the proof
  • Firing behavior
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

A little more of the BSF Story

Bayerische Sportwaffen Fabrik (BSF) was established in 1935. They made some airguns before WW II, but after the war is when they really got going. They were located in Erlangen, a town that’s about 15 kilometers from Nuremberg, but today is more like a suburb.

BSF airgun models ranged from youth guns to serious adult guns. Their lowest model was called the Junior that was a plain-Jane youth breakbarrel. Above that the Media came next. It shared a few parts with the Junior like the trigger but it was longer, heavier and more powerful. Think of them as the Diana 23/25. read more


Hatsan SpeedFire Vortex multi-shot breakbarrel air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Hatsan Speedfire
Hatsan SpeedFire Vortex breakbarrel repeater.

This report covers:

  • I like the design
  • Velocity and power
  • Easy to load
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Discussion
  • H&N Baracudas
  • Feeding
  • Summary

Today we learn about the velocity of the new Hatsan SpeedFire Vortex multi-shot rifle. As you remember from Part 1, this is a repeating breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle. The one I’m testing is a .22, but there is also a .177 available.

I like the design

For starters, I like the design of the SpeedFire’s magazine. It doesn’t sit out naked, nor does it stop you from closing the barrel after it is empty. I’m referring to many bolt-action PCP repeaters that cannot close their bolts on an empty magazine. That does prevent you from dry-firing but also forces you to remove the magazine after it is empty. I prefer to be in control of the airgun at all times. read more


Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

This report covers:

  • The Whiskey3 reticle
  • The test
  • Couldn’t get the rifle to group!
  • The double group
  • Sandbag rest
  • Wraith Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • I can do this!
  • Air Arms domes
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Last group
  • Summary

Today I start looking critically at the accuracy of the new Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle. Until now I have only shot 5-shot groups. They are okay for quick work but do not tell the whole story. Today I will shoot 10-shot groups and we will learn the accuracy of this new rifle with some precision. I won’t get into the statistical reason that 10 shots are better than 5, but here is a good bottom line — anybody can get lucky, and it is far easier to do it 5 times in a row than 10.

The Whiskey3 reticle

Before we get into this test report, reader Bimjo asked this. read more


Crosman’s Mark I Target pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman Mark I
Crosman Mark I target pistol.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Loading the CO2 cartridge
  • O-ring material
  • Velocity
  • RWS Hobby
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Discussion
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today we look at the power of my Crosman Mark I Target pistol. This will be interesting because I don’t remember ever doing it. I probably did, but without a report to read I can’t remember.

Loading the CO2 cartridge

Usually on a CO2 pistol that stores the 12-gram CO2 cartridge in the grip, one of the grip panels comes off to remove and install the cartridge — the left one, more often than not. Not so with this pistol. Instead there is a large knurled cap at the bottom of the grip that is removed, and the cartridge inside slides out. If there is still significant gas in the gun, the pressure will force the o-ring in the cap to seal the cap tight and it may not rotate. Don’t use pliers to force it! Shoot the gun until the gas is gone or almost gone. read more


Benjamin Trail Nitro Piston Mark II pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin Trail NP MkII
Benjamin Trail NP Mark II air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Adjustable trigger
  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Aiming
  • RWS Hobby
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Additional testing
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Benjamin Trail Nitro Piston Mark II with the factory-mounted open sights. But before we get to that, there is some old business to clear up.

Adjustable trigger

There was quite a bit of interest in the adjustable trigger last time — mostly because I showed that I could not get a screwdriver on it to adjust. There was so much interest that I vowed to try to adjust it for this report.

I removed the barreled action from the stock. All it took was removing the 4 stock screws and lifting the action out of the grip/stock. The safety button fell out at the same time. read more