Crosman Outdsoorsman 2250XE: Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2


The Crosman 2250 XE is a fine example of what the Crosman Custom Shop can do.

Well, today is accuracy day for the Crosman Outdsoorsman 2250XE, and this was one time that I didn’t read the owners’ reviews before testing. I just mounted a scope and went to work.

The scope
Because I thought the 2250 would be a tackdriver, I mounted a Centerpoint 8-32×56 scope. It’s obviously too much scope for the gun, but I didn’t want people telling me afterward that I should have used a better scope. Nobody could say that this scope isn’t enough to do the job! The 2250XE does come with a 3-9x32AO scope that should be plenty good for all situations. I just wanted to stretch the limits. read more


Crosman Outdoorsman 2250XE: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


The Crosman 2250 XE is a fine example of what the Crosman Custom Shop can do.

We’ll look at the 2250XE today for velocity. I just want to remind you that I predicted this carbine would shoot faster than the advertised 550 f.p.s. and, indeed, it does.

This CO2 air rifle uses a single 12-gram CO2 cartridge as a power source. Normally, I would guess that we would see about 40 good shots from a cartridge, but today I counted them, so we’ll all know for sure.

Trigger-pull
I mentioned in Part 1 that I really liked the trigger-pull. Today, I’ll say more about it. At first examination, it feels like a single-stage pull, and that’s what the specs say it is. After using it a while, I could feel a definite hesitation in the pull that turned it into a two-stage pull for me. You have to be careful to not fire the gun by pulling too fast; but if you pull in a controlled way, the trigger does have a two-stage feel, which makes it much more precise. read more


Crosman Outdsoorsman 2250XE: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Today, we’ll start a look at an unusual airgun from Crosman. It’s getting to be summer around the country, and the summer guns are CO2 guns, so today’s choice of the Crosman Outdsoorsman 2250XE is just in time. This .22 caliber CO2 carbine wouldn’t exist if Crosman hadn’t reinvented itself at the beginning of the 21st century.

Dennis Quackenbush and I sat on both sides of Crosman’s former president and CEO during the Airgun Breakfast at the NRA Annual Meetings in Kansas City, back in May 2001. We were all chatting about the airgun business, and I happened to mention that Dennis made a good living making and selling upgrades and accessories to what was at that time a $39 Crosman CO2 pistol. The executive was surprised, thinking that no one would want to spend money on such a cheap airgun, but Dennis floored him when he said, “You sell them the gun for $39 and then I sell them $125 worth of accessories for it.” From his facial expression, I don’t think he really believed me. read more