Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Stormrider
Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • RWS Superdome
  • Experience pays off
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • The trigger
  • Next — the shocker!
  • Aiming error
  • Magazine
  • Final group
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the .22-caliber Diana Stormrider PCP. I know that many of you are eagerly awaiting these tests to make an important decision. Let’s jump right in.

The test

I shot using open sights from 25 yards off a rest today for several reasons. First, the Stormrider comes with open sights and, while a scope has to be sighted-in which can take some time to do, a gun’s native sights should be pretty much on all the time. The second reason I trusted the sights is the rifle I’m testing is one Pyramyd Air put through many tests already. Surely they have shaken it down before sending it to me.

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The Beeman R10/HW 85: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 85
Weihrauch HW 85.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Beeman Kodiaks
  • Eye not up to par
  • RWS Superdome
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Crosman Premiers
  • 25 yards
  • Summary

The test

Today is our first day of accuracy testing the HW85 and I’m going to do something different. I will start at 10 meters, using the open sights that came on the rifle I’m testing. But I will only shoot 5-shot groups. I’m not interested in the absolute accuracy at 10 meters because this rifle can shoot farther than that. Ten meters is too close to accuracy test a rifle like this and expect any degree of confidence, and today you will see why.

Naturally I’m shooting with the rifle rested on a sandbag. I’m using the artillery hold, because even though the rifle is super smooth, it still recoils forward a lot. I held my off hand forward, under the rear of the cocking slot.

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Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Stormrider
Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Wow!
  • Good enough for the price
  • Trigger
  • How loud?
  • Shots per fill
  • Crosman Premiers
  • How powerful?
  • The discharge?
  • Tremendous tuning potential!
  • The trigger
  • More power?
  • Powerful lesson
  • Summary

Wow!

Before I do today’s velocity test of this .22-caliber precharged rifle, I will begin by addressing all the issues, questions and concerns you have about the pedigree of the new Diana Stormrider. Right off the bat someone tells us the rifle is Chinese and made by Snow Peak. I knew that last time but decided to leave it out. Guys, it’s a global economy today and companies do that. Some don’t, and keep everything in house, but more and more often companies either source their parts from the outside, or they buy fabricated parts built to their specifications or they even buy entire products like the Stormrider, and put their names on them. It’s a fact of life.

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The Beeman R10/HW 85: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 85
Weihrauch HW 85.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Crosman Premiers
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 5.51mm heads
  • Top speed?
  • Hobbys
  • Firing cycle
  • Cocking
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation so far

Today we learn how powerful this smooth-shooting .22-caliber HW85 is. You may remember from Part 1 that I bought this rifle because of its super-smooth tune. So, let’s get right to it.

Crosman Premiers

The first pellet to be tested was the 14.3-grain Crosman Premier. These loaded easily and averaged 678 f.p.s. The range went from 672 to 693 — a spread of 21 f.p.s. At the average velocity this pellet produces 14.6 foot pounds. This was so close to the “magic” velocity of 671 f.p.s., where the weight of the pellet in grains equals the muzzle energy in foot pounds. I mention that because it’s just a handy thing to know.

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Gamo Swarm Maxxim: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gamo Swarm Maxim
Gamo Swarm Maxxim repeating breakbarrel air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The scope
  • Pellet length?
  • Accuracy
  • What went right?
  • What remains?
  • Targets

Today I start testing the accuracy of the Gamo Swarm Maxxim multi-shot rifle. I decided to go straight to 25 yards, as that is the distance at which they say their scope is parallax adjusted.

The scope

The scope comes with the mount installed and all you need to do is attach it to the rifle. I found it very quick and easy to mount.

Gamo Maxxim scope base
The scope is installed in the rings when you get it, and the mount just has to be clamped on the rifle. Easy! The stop pin (right) slips into a hole on the Swarm base.

You absolutely cannot see the repeating mechanism in the scope. The image is clear. However, with a dot sight mounted at the same height the mechanism is clearly visible.

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The Beeman C1 – Part 2 The rifle that created the artillery hold!

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
A history of airguns

This is an oldie from 2009 that I recycled because I was out of town, attending to my sister last week. Today we look at Part 2.


Despite the size of this photo, the C1 is a small rifle. The western look was unique in its day. The scope is a 2-7X32 BSA.

Part 1

If you remember, the C1 is one of the first adult air rifles I ever owned. I got my .177 C1 from Beeman and had the opportunity to break it in and shoot it until it smoothed out to become a great little shooter.

Today I’m testing the .22 version I acquired in a big trade with my buddy Mac, following the Little Rock show this year. I didn’t own a chronograph when I had the first rifle, so this test will be as revealing to me as it is to you. Kind of like finding out whether the girl next door was really as chaste as you envisioned when you were a kid, or whether she dated the fleet.

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Kral Puncher Pro B W PCP rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Kral Puncher Pro
Kral Puncher Pro PCP. The test rifle’s walnut stock is not as blonde as this one.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Mounted a scope
  • Accuracy
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Trigger pull
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Nice pistol grip
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Evaluation so far

Today we start looking at the accuracy of the Kral Puncher Pro PCP air rifle. I have several of these Kral PCPs to test, so I’m spending time with this first one to learn the brand. Things like the unusual way the magazine is inserted into the receiver and how the power adjustment works need to be learned before I can feel comfortable testing these air rifles.

As a reminder, these Kral PCPs offer features found in more expensive airguns at an attractive price. The test rifle also has a very nice stock made of walnut. In Part 2 we discovered that the power adjuster, while not offering distinct stops for adjustment, does put the rifle at a stable place each and every time. And we learned that this Puncher Pro is very stingy with air — getting as many as 80 shots per fill, depending on where the power is set.

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