FX Dreamlite precharged air rifle: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FX Dreamlite
FX Dreamlite precharged pneumatic rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 1 UTG 4-16 OP3 Compact scope
Part 5

This report covers:

  • Unscheduled test
  • Small magazine flops around
  • Quick review
  • The bad
  • Sight in
  • The test
  • Group 1
  • Meopta reticle
  • Adjusted the scope
  • Group 2
  • Group 3
  • Superdomes
  • Group 4
  • Group 5
  • Group 6
  • Oh, NO!
  • What’s next?
  • Summary

Unscheduled test

This is an unscheduled test. I looked at the .177-caliber FX Dreamlite and realized that I had been hard on it in past tests. The poor manual (that has since been fixed), the confusing power adjuster (that is not fixed and still confusing) and the rifle’s seeming inability to group with any but a couple selected pellets put me off. But at the root of my bias was the large 21-shot circular magazine that comes with the rifle. Who in their right mind wants 21 shots in a magazine — especially when it makes the mag as large as a dinner plate? That is a rhetorical question. I know there are lots of shooters who want 21 shots in their magazines. But not me. read more


FX Dreamlite precharged air rifle : Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FX Dreamlite
FX Dreamlite precharged pneumatic rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 1 UTG 4-16 OP3 Compact scope

This report covers:

  • Mounting the scope
  • Sunscreen
  • Clear, clear, clear!
  • First target
  • Target two
  • JSB Beasts
  • Crosman Premier Lights give strange group(s)!
  • Crosman Premier Heavy
  • Second attempt
  • Summary for the UTG scope
  • Summary for the FX Dreamlight

Today is really two reports in one. I’m covering the new UTG 4-16 AO Compact scope and this is also the fifth report on the FX-Dreamlite precharged pneumatic air rifle. I’m glad I got back to it because I found a second good pellet for the rifle today. But first the scope.

Mounting the scope

Because the FX Dreamlite is such a drooper I tried to use the Sportsmatch 30mm high adjustable scope mounts. The would have been ideal, but they don’t work because of the FX 21-shot magazine that sticks up so high above the top of the receiver. I ended up using the True Strength mounts that came with the UTG scope and I shimmed under the scope on the rear ring. The scope barely fit so the magazine can be installed. And yes, I am aware there is a Mini FX 10-shot rotary magazine available. I just don’t have one. But that’s what this rifle needs. read more


Crosman 13XX rifle, a modified 1377 pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

modified Crosman 1377 pistol
A 1377 pistol, converted to a .22 caliber rifle.

Part 1

Today’s report is Part 2 of the conversion report on a Crosman 13XX pistol into rifle by reader Benji-Don.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, over to you, Benji-Don.

Crosman 13XX rifle, a modified 1377 pistol: Part 2

This report covers:

  • Pumps vs Velocity
  • Barrel weights
  • Accuracy
  • Costs
  • Conclusions

Pumps vs Velocity

In this report all of my velocity numbers are with Crosman Domed 14.3 gr pellets. I have three sets of pumps vs velocity data to show the progression in the efficiency of the gun from the stock valve. In all three sets the stock 0.142-inch transfer bushing has been drilled out. read more


Sheridan Blue Streak: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Blue Streak
My Sheridan Blue Streak dates back to 1978 when I bought it new.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • H&N Baracuda
  • Crosman Premiers
  • H&N Field Target Trophy
  • H&N Baracuda
  • Discussion
  • Adjusting windage on a Sheridan Blue Streak
  • 10-shot group
  • Sights moved the wrong way
  • Final group
  • Summary

Today I move back to 25 yards, to test the accuracy of the Sheridan Blue Streak for the last time. I used the information that was gathered from the accuracy test in Part 3 to select the pellets for today’s test.

The test

I shot from 25 yards while seated with the rifle rested on a sandbag. I shot 5 shots at each target but one and I will explain about that one when we get to it. I pumped the rifle 4 times per shot for every shot in today’s test. I will comment on the sights as the report progresses, but when I started the sights were where they were for the 10-meter test in Part 3. read more


Sheridan Blue Streak: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Blue Streak
My Sheridan Blue Streak dates back to 1978 when I bought it new.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Crosman Premier
  • Benjamin Cylindrical pellets
  • Predator Polymags
  • H&N Baracuda
  • Field Target Trophy
  • JSB Exact
  • Sheridan Cylindrical pellet
  • A different number of pump strokes
  • Discussion
  • What can cause poor accuracy?
  • Summary

We have an interesting day ahead of us! This is the first day we test the accuracy of my vintage Sheridan Blue Streak. Let’s get started!

The test

I shot from 10 meters off a sandbag rest. The rifle rested directly on the sandbag. I shot 5-shot groups for the entire test. To begin with I shot each different pellet on 4 pumps. I’ll take the most accurate pellet and do something more with it at the end of this test. And I never adjusted the sights during this entire test.

Crosman Premier

To this point the now-obsolete 14.3-grain Crosman Premiers have been the most accurate pellets in this rifle. The sights were on in 2016, so I shot from 10 meters with no sighters. read more


Sheridan Blue Streak: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Blue Streak
My Sheridan Blue Streak dates back to 1978 when I bought it new.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Lots of pellets
  • Test plan
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Huh?
  • Consistency
  • Last test — Benjamin Cylindricals
  • Pump effort
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today I test my Sheridan Blue Streak’s velocity. If you read the test I did in 2016 you know that I had the rifle resealed by Jeff Cloud at that time. Up to that point it still had the seals that were installed at the factory in 1977 when the rifle was made, so that’s 39 years on the first set of seals.

Before resealing the rifle, .20 caliber 14.3-grain Crosman Premiers (a pellet that’s no longer available) made 462 f.p.s. on 8 pumps, where the manual says to stop, and it went 476 f.p.s. on 10 pumps with no air remaining in the gun after the shot. read more


Smith & Wesson model 77A multi-pump pneumatic air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

S&W 77A
My S&W model 77A rifle. The black paint is flaking off the aluminum receiver, but the steel and wood parts are both in good condition.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The experiment
  • Accuracy test
  • Sight-in
  • Crosman Premiers
  • RWS Superdomes
  • RWS Hobby
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Now what?
  • Zero the dot sight
  • Stuff happens
  • Summary

Today we test the accuracy of the Smith & Wesson 77A multi-pump pneumatic air rifle, but first we have an experiment to do. On Friday I told you I had added ATF sealant to the rifle’s pump cup, and during shooting it got blown through the valve to get onto every internal seal.

At the end of the Friday velocity test the rifle was shooting a lot faster than it had in the beginning. I said it could have been due to the pumping that had heated the seals, making them more flexible and efficient. Or it could have been the ATF sealant, which does the same thing. Or it could have been a combination of both. read more