The new Walther Lever Action CO2 rifle: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


Walther Lever Action CO2 rifle

Today, we’ll look at the power the new Walther Lever Action CO2 rifle generates. Since my old Walther Lever Action is a carbine with a shorter barrel, I hoped to see some improvement in velocity from this rifle, and I surely got it.

Like most of the repeating airguns made by Umarex, the Lever Action uses a circular 8-shot clip. Instead of 10 shots for velocity calculations, I used 8. I’ll also do that when shooting targets for the accuracy test.

Trigger performance
Kevin had asked about the trigger on the rifle. It’s not adjustable, but the second stage does break cleanly at 4 lbs., 6 ozs. It’s a very nice, crisp feel that I think will satisfy most shooters.

Velocity test
Walther recommends that you use either wadcutters or domed pellets in their repeaters that have a circular clip. Since either of those pellets will be more accurate than hollowpoints or pointed pellets anyway, I say, “Why not?” I find myself using domes for almost everything these days,anyway, because they’re so accurate at long ranges, but since the Walther Lever Action will be used primarily for plinking at shorter distances, wadcutters will do just as well.

The first pellet tested was the Falcon from Air Arms. This is a lighter domed pellet that’s often quite accurate in some rifles. I’m hoping it will be in this one, too. They averaged 576 f.p.s. for 8 shots with a spread that went from 571 to 587 f.p.s. The average velocity delivers a muzzle energy of 5.4 foot pounds.

Next, I tried the old standby Crosman Premier 7.9-grain domed pellet. At an average of 561 f.p.s,. they delivered 5.52 foot-pounds of muzzle energy. The spread went from 555 to 569 f.p.s.

Easy to cock
I have to observe at this point that this is an easy rifle to cock and load. The butter-smooth lever works with so little energy that you can cycle it with the rifle on your shoulder and the sights aligned with the target.

Then, I tried H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets. They weigh 7.56 grain, and in the Lever Action rifle they averaged 569 f.p.s. The spread went from 562 to 581 f.p.s. At the average velocity, the energy at the muzzle was 5.44 foot pounds. This is another pellet that should be accurate in this rifle.

The last pure lead pellet I tested was the lightweight RWS Hobby. At just 7 grains, Hobbys are usually the fastest lead pellet in any gun, and they didn’t disappoint here. They averaged 583 f.p.s. for 8 shots. The spread was only from 577 to 593 f.p.s. They averaged 5.28 foot pounds of muzzle energy.

Trick pellets
I couldn’t finish without testing at least one trick pellet, so I selected the Crosman High Velocity Super Sonic Pellet that weighs just 4 grains. It averaged 689 f.p.s., but the spread was large, running from 660 to 706, a spread of 66 f.p.s. At the average velocity, these pellets produced 4.22 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle. Just for fun, I’ll also test these pellets for accuracy. Wouldn’t it be fun if they turned out to be accurate?

General observations
I’m still impressed with the rifle’s smooth action, crisp trigger and with the overall look of quality. I hope this rifle will continue Walther’s Lever Action tradition of being a tackdriver.

Please take note that lighter pellets produce less energy in CO2 guns. That’s because CO2 gas needs longer to accelerate the pellet to an optimum velocity. So, just like pneumatics, light pellets produce less energy than heavy pellets.

69 thoughts on “The new Walther Lever Action CO2 rifle: Part 2



    • I hope that it’s true. I didn’t think we would ever get him. Too many loyal people protecting him.

      The only down side is that Obama will take credit for it and get more votes.

      twotalon


    • He was apparently ‘buried at sea’ (dumped into the ocean) so there would be no pilgrimage sight for fellow filthy bearded terrorists. I hope he sinks all the way to the very bottom, where he will slowly rot, and have his flesh stripped away by hagfish. But hey, I’m a romantic!



    • Osama may or may not be dead, though I hope with all my heart he is.

      Why was it buried so quick?

      How did they verify who it was quickly enough to chuck him into the ocean?

      If they wanted him dead why didn’t they just use a drone? Why did they go in on foot, and then shoot him dead? Why risk troops?

      Why did Obama play golf the whole morning and into the afternoon — supposedly after he gave the order to get Bin Laden? Would YOU do that?


      • I would certainly do exactly that — play golf or whatever I would normally do. Obama had given the order, and once the operation was switched on he was very wise not to interfere in its execution. Remember Carter and the Iranian operation where he was giving direct orders to the soldiers on the ground.

        Further, Obama could neither do nor say anything that would break his Sunday pattern, because he didn’t want to tip anybody that there was something going on. When JFK got a “diplomatic cold” in the runup to the Cuban Missile Crisis it stimulated speculation all over the country, much of it pretty accurate.

        Apparently they were able to collect DNA from the compound to pre-identify the man, and ran a DNA match on the actual corpse before announcing. Why “bury” the body immediately? Muslim law says burial in 24 hours; there was no real need for an autopsy; and nobody would have wanted to give Osama’s followers a chance to demand the body to make a shrine.

        Let’s not start a “Deather movement” about Osama.


        • Pete, these are my thoughts and sentiments exactly. With a drone dropping a 500 lb smart bomb, there’s not much left for DNA analysis. At least the team that went in and those high enough to have access to all the details, know the results and are confident to say it was successful. I read that the operation was watched “real time”. Perhaps in my lifetime, those videos will be released so that We, the People, can watch them as well. Until confronted with incontrovertibal proof to the contrary, I’ll accept the Government’s word that we got bin Laden.

          I wonder what Obama’s golf score was? If it was me, I wouldn’t have been able to hit the darn ball.

          Fred PRoNJ


          • Could they have also tried to question the guy? He probably wouldn’t be saying much but I think I’d still give it a try.
            Can you imagine the guys on that boat… the relief of letting that body sink into the sea.

            J-F


            • The reports say he was shot in the head. They don’t say who did the shooting. It might have been self-inflicted to prevent torture (in his mind) or questioning. I think I remember reading where he said he would never be taken alive and I’m glad we accommodated him. He has nothing I want to hear, anyway.
              -Chuck


              • Chuck,

                Stories I’ve read say a SEAL had him in his sights, confirmed it was the correct target & took the shot…double-tap to the head. Tom has taught me the same thing when it comes to self-defense…two in the head & you know they’re dead.

                Edith


        • “Muslim law says burial in 24 hours”

          Oh yeah? Tell that to Wesley Batalona, Scott Helvenston, Jerry Zovko, and Michael Teague (May they rest in enternal peace).

          Osama Bin Laden, IMHO, renounced his right to be treated according to Islamic customs when he murdered 3,000 innocent American civilians, an action violating how many dozen Islamic laws?

          His stiff should have been displayed for the world to see until it rotted, and THEN disposed of in a place non-conducive toward shrine building.



          • I don’t want to continue this but do have to respond. The President of the United States has to balance more interests than a desire for vengeance on the part of some Americans. We would do ourselves much more harm than good if we irritated the large fraction of the Muslim world who might ally themselves with us, given a chance, but who do hold Bin Laden in high esteem, or who might feel humiliated at the apparent ease with which we killed him. As it is we seem to have done it just right.

            You asked why not just use a bomb. 1) collateral damage which we need to avoid and 2) we really wanted the corpse so we could take a DNA sample. Hard to do that if you’re not boots on the ground.


    • Yippeee! When thousands of people are jumping for joy when you get bumped off, I would say that you have screwed up somewhere in your life. I guess those Navy Seals are earning their pay between dealing with pirates and now this.

      Matt61



      • My thoughts regarding Osama Bin Laden’s express trip to hell:

        First I must say that President Obama deserves kudos for having the fortitude to order the hit. We had our chance during the Bush administration, but the powers that be (Rumsfeld) decided to farm out the work to warlords and tribal leaders that were ‘on our side’ only because of the sizable bribes they were being paid.

        Likewise Clinton had a multitude of chances to take him out (possibly preventing 9/11) but relented due to political concerns and weakness.

        One bit of irony. The intelligence that led to his location in Pakistan came from inmates at Gitmo, the detention center in Cuba that Obama vowed to close within 1 year of taking office. I don’t know the man’s mind, but I hope that was one campaign promise he never intended to keep.

        Sure, we could have dropped a daisy cutter on the compound, but there might be almost nothing left of him to offer as proof of his death or worse yet, missed him and allowed him to escape. Many bombs were dropped on Tora Bora. No, I am happy we had some bad-ass SEALs on the ground, so we could verify the kill and that some of the best that America has to offer would have the gratification of this monumental accomplishment. Now that Osama has been disposed of, I think that compound IS in need of a daisy cutter.

        As for his quick body dump, on the one hand I feel he had no right to be treated as he would have wanted to, under islamic tradition. On the other hand his prompt disposal relieves us of any possibility of some type of diplomatic deal for his body, or to give the filthy savage terrorists the chance to get worked up into a froth about it.

        Now, I am not one for torture or terrorism, but I would not have minded if he were fed to wild pigs while he was still alive. Then the pigs could have been buried at sea. I just hope they dumped him overboard with the rest of the excrement collected from the ship.

        Back to our regularly scheduled program.



  1. Been a long time since a new gun has captivated my attention like this new Walther Lever Action. I’m not a CO2 guy since I’m in Colorado but I’m drawn to this gun like a moth to a flame. The butter smooth lever is not what I wanted to hear. I’m running out of excuses. I need another gun like I need a ………….

    That buttpad looks like a shoe designed for a club foot. I’m still not put off. Crisp 4 lbs. 6 oz. is ok for plinking.

    In part 1 didn’t B.B. say or the pictures show that the LOP was longer on this new Walther than a Winchester 94? Where’s the link to part 1? I need to calm down since I’m ready to push the button on the purchase.

    If this thing is accurate I’m doomed.

    kevin


    • Could not agree more, Kevin. I can’t understand why the butt pad is so big on this thing. Still does not matter, I really must have one. Is it just me, or does everyone feel the urge to shoot FT with this thing? I think there needs to be a 6 ft/lb class anyway, and this would be super cool (with open sights to boot).



        • Kevin,
          I hope I didn’t shine a negative light on the WLE with my resent comment and target pics to SL on shot count for the older version. I was trying to shoot fast. If the newer version is anywhere close to the older two cart version accuracy is excellent, at 10m, anyway. I would think the new big cart version would be just as accurate. If you want re-proof I can resend the photos or reshoot for you.
          -Chuck



    • Still have the Crosman lever action .22 cal model 99 from my childhood. If you like vintage ,that’s another one. Mine will shoot around 550fps with hobbies on high power. Usually can be bought for around $100-150 for a working one ,but beware as it is a fiddly thing to re-seal and parts are scarce. This Walther should be a .22 also.


      • Robert from Arcade,

        It’s the potential shot count in the Walther Lever Action that is intriguing. Candidly, the looks of this gun hit home with me. Guess I should log in from this point forward as Mr. Shallow.

        kevin


        • Kevin :
          My 99 holds 14 shots in it’s spring loaded magazine. More than the Walthers cylinder, but the Walther does look nicer I suppose. The 99 was supposed to mimic the Savage 99, but it really doesn’t to my mind. The Crosman has a exposed hammer, and two power levels . Mine is as accurate as a typical QB in .22, and I’ve shot rats with it inside buildings. A lever repeater is very cool, you just got to get one to try.



  2. This looks like a marvelous fun gun. A Red Ryder for grownups! I hope to add one of these to my collection.

    As to UBL, congratulations to all involved. Too bad it resulted in dumping garbage at sea.

    Les


    • Desertdweller,
      I don’t want to sound disrespectful to you but comparing this Walther Lever Action rifle to a Red Ryder is like comparing a Ferrari to a Yugo. πŸ™‚ I have the pre-bigcartridge version and it is a Ferrari F-40. Ok, Ok, I’m over-reacting. But, I like my WLE very much. Your suspicoions of this being a “a marvelous fun gun” are not unfounded.
      -Chuck


      • At the time that I had a Yugo a friend had a 308GTS. I got a real kick showing him how many parts were interchangeable (via the FIAT connection). Knick-knacky stuff like the oil filler cap, but it was great fun nonetheless.


      • Chuck,

        The comparison I was making was the appearance and concept of the two guns. Both styled after the old Winchester. Both designed for informal plinking.

        I enjoy shooting Red Ryders with my young grandson, although the RR has a rather short length of pull for an adult. I’m sure the Walther Lever Action would be more comfortable for me to shoot. I still keep a couple of RR’s around the house for the fun of it. So, I would consider the Lever Action to be the Red Ryder of the Baby Boomer Generation.

        Can’t say much about Ferarris. Seen them on the road. I worked with a guy who had a small collection of Yugos. I rode in his. He said some parts were interchangable with the original Ford Festivas (one of the original “world cars”).

        Les


        • I see your analogy. It is remarkable how much the Walther LE copies the real Winchester 1894. BB has some pictures of the two together and it is hard to tell the difference. I have heard the heft is similar, also. I currently have my WLE scoped but recently put a peep sight on my Bronco. After doing that and realizing how well it’s working I’ve been thinking of going back to iron sights on the ’94. I certainly hope the new WLE is as accurate as the older one. It has to be since the barrels are Walthers. I’m anxious to see how BB does with the new one especially if he shoots at 20(+)yds.
          -Chuck


  3. I agree with Kevin and some others, this is a real pretty gun. But the extra thick butt plate is a bit odd; almost like an afterthought.
    I think the photo in this blog makes the gun look better than the photo in Part 1. The side by side comparison with the 2 classics accentuated the feature. Looks like a fun gun!
    Lloyd


    • I keep reading references to the oversized buttstock and the buttplate. This gun is gorgeous! Holding in my hand and putting it to my shoulder, it’s perfect. I think there may be an optical illusion that shows the butt to be bigger in the photo than it really is. Hmmm…I think I’ll use that excuse myself πŸ™‚

      Edith



        • Fred,
          Nice “does my butt look big” shot. It appears to me they tried to use the original stock and then extend it with rubber/plastic to hold the longer cart. Those cost conscious, no need to re-tool
          !@#$677! LOL πŸ™‚
          -Chuck


  4. Matt61,
    Springers are really great training guns. With my more powerful rifles, trigger squeeze can mean the difference between being off 2 or 3 inches, and staying within half an inch at 20 yards. And yes, follow through is critical. Springers magnify every typical mistake that one might make. I can’t help but shoot my more difficult springers because thus far, I’ve been able to master all of them. They just take a lot more work than most guns. What’s interesting is that I have an FWB 700 ALU, but feel more compelled to shoot the more difficult springers. If I approach shooting them with a weak mind, then I’m all over the place. But if I approach them from a hardened, disciplined, competitive mindset, then good things happen. The great shooters that I know of were very selective about each shot that they took. Last night I received a letter about some of the greatest shooters of all time. The one thing that all of the greats have in common is an unshakable belief in themselves. They are all extremely determined to achieve great performance from themselves. Point being that EVERY shot matters. Shooting is also about problem solving, and nothing presents more problems than a springer.

    Victor


    • Victor, thanks for replying. Hard, competitive… I like that. Remind me what springers you use.

      What is your method for breaking out of a slump? I’m assaying a zen approach: there is no slump so there is nothing to break out of…. More specifically, I’m focusing more on my technique. Last night was better. I only threw one shot out of my 10 shot group and that one was still part of the contiguous opening. It just messed up my nice border.

      Does expensive shooting clothing matter for prone? I’m wondering if prone shooting is my way around the fabulous expense of shooting clothes. I am very much enjoying my natural point of aim in the prone position. It feels pretty good to be all slung up correctly with the whole body linked together.

      Matt61


      • Matt61,
        You might recall that I advocated the same mental attitude about practicing martial arts. – Don’t execute in practice differently than you would in a match. Lately I’ve been focusing on my Gamo Hunter Extreme and Ruger Air-Magnum. If I don’t practice what I preach with this rifle, I can be off by several inches at 20 yards. But if I do everything right, I can shoot clovers. I believe that this rifle is more accurate than I’ve experienced with it. The best pellet that I have for it are the Crosman Premier Heavies. When B.B. and Mac reviewed this rifle, they showed a vertical spread that wasn’t very impressive. My experience tells me that this pellet is not good enough for this rifle. It has a bigger bore than my other air-rifles, so my batch of Premiers fit the breach inconsistently. Some just fall in, and some fit very tight. I believe that this rifle requires high-end, very consistent, pellets that are either 4.51 or 4.52 diameter. H&N has the Baracuda Match, 10.65 grain, round nose, pellet that I think is probably the best match for this rifle, and they come in 3 diameters. What I think is beautiful is that it’s possible to execute well enough to cause it to settle pretty darn close to the bulls-eye, and give me clover groups. To me, THIS is what it’s all about, and why I love these things!

        I never think of myself as being in a slump. There is either something wrong that needs solving, or maybe I’m just not up to doing ANYTHING that requires total and complete concentration. A common issue for me is failing to apply the fundamentals, especially if I’m out of practice. The harder a gun is to shoot, the more conscious I have to be about things like trigger squeeze and follow-through. Because I don’t believe in slumps, which really don’t put you in a place where you can do much, I don’t feel frustration. Lones Wigger says that good shooters must be intelligent, because only they are in a position to experience and solve their problems.

        Regarding shooting jackets. – If you’re not in great physical condition, your pulse will matter a great deal, making your choice in shooting jackets more critical. If you’re in good shape, a good shooting jacket will still make a difference, just not as much. The answer to your question really depends on the type of competition you want to try; NRA rules, or International rules? I can tell you that with my new International jacket, because the canvas is so stiff, I hardly feel the rifle against my shoulder. Also, in prone shooting, I always lift my right leg up to raise my mid-section from the ground. This further reduces the effects of blood pressure. In any case, I think a good jacket matters, even in prone, because a poor jacket can cause discomfort, or offer inadequate support or padding.
        Victor


    • Victor,
      Believe me when I say I am strictly an amateur, in every sense of the word, but I know first hand what you are talking about when you speak of “weak mind”. When I shoot my IZH-46M it makes a big difference in what my attitude happens to be at the time I pull the trigger. If I doubt myself I shoot wild. If I concentrate and have what I call “the dreaded resolve” I will be in the 9 or 10 ring. The latter is not natural for me – I have to make myself think I can do it, concentrate and follow through to make it happen.
      -Chuck


      • Chuck,
        “…I have to make myself think I can do it…” is exactly what the greatest shooters have built into their psychology. They automatically believe that they can do it, and the rest is patience, unwavering confidence, incredible “one shot at a time” focus. I wish I could share the letter that I got last night, but I think it’s intended for an article. I’ll say this much about myself. I don’t entertain self-doubt, nor indulge negative thoughts, including blame. Because of this, even when having the worse of times, I don’t allow myself to get frustrated. I simply believe that a solution exists, and that I need time to find it. And you know what, there almost always is a solution. I just needed to step back and look at things from a fresh perspective.
        Victor


      • Actually, there are a few things that help while shooting:

        1. Finding a best hold (hand placement) that gets you within the 10 ring.
        2. Know that best hold and doing it consistently.
        3. Find a best trigger placement corresponding to that best hold.
        4. Know that best trigger placement, and remember not to drag your trigger finger backwards with
        other parts of your hand, but instead use only that one muscle.
        5. Squeeze the trigger such that it does not disturb your sight alignment (or aim).
        6. Find your natural point of aim, where when relaxed, your cross-hairs dance around the bulls-eye.
        (absolutely no force required to keep your wobble area centered around the bulls-eye)
        7. Trust in the value of Follow-Through. Watch closely throughout the shot, and see where the cross-
        hairs land after everything settles. When you’re doing everything right, your cross-hairs will land
        very close to the bulls-eye after all the motion has settled.

        Follow-through reveals the truth about your execution. If you’re doing something wrong, you might see the gun pointing way off after firing. Recoil alone does NOT cause this. Understand that recoil is an action that causes the gun to go where YOU are guiding it. If follow-through shows that the gun is not settling back where it was when you decided to pull the trigger, then there was something wrong with your hand placement, finger placement, finger contraction, or natural point of aim.

        Believe that you can squeeze that trigger without disturbing sight alignment (or aim), and follow through to see the truth of your execution. Be disciplined about this single act of squeezing the trigger and following through. Don’t shoot out of desperation because you grew impatient, or ran out of breath. Start over if you feel yourself stressed. This simple act of executing good shots (i.e., when everything looks good) is what you need to practice and be conscious of. Don’t allow yourself to throw away shots, because that will become who you are as a shooter. Trust in your trigger squeeze and follow-through.

        Victor


        • Victor,
          “…If you’re doing something wrong, you might see the gun pointing way off after firing….”
          “…Don’t shoot out of desperation because you grew impatient, or ran out of breath…”
          “…Don’t allow yourself to throw away shots…”
          Do you have a spy camera or something on my range? How do you know all those negative things I end up doing?
          -Chuck



  5. Slinging Lead, thanks for the name, Linet. What a nice name. And I know there are no creepy vibes. It’s the elderly you’ve got it in for…. What I like most about Linet’s expression is the confidence. Not something you commonly see on a young girl’s face.

    I’m continuing my consuming fascination with Russian women snipers. Duskwight, can you identify the rousing song in this clip?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqLrkbALg20

    There is a discussion about the song in the comments that is carried out with cursing and doesn’t tell me anything. So, is this song pure propaganda or the voice of Russian national spirit which was surely the decisive element in that war? I tend to think the latter. It makes me think that what we call culture that is carried out today with multimedia and communications technology and tends to be expressed in a discordant and highly individualistic manner as in the flame war of this clip is not a new thing. Earlier generations had their own methods of cultural symbolism like the singing here that were extremely powerful and highly cohesive in a way that we do not see today. I was working at a nursing home once where there was a singing activity of patriotic songs. You should have seen the old ladies in their wheelchairs belting out the air force song about flying through the wild blue yonder and diving down with their guns blazing….

    Here is ultimate female sniper ace Lyudmila Pavilechenko giving a speech in New York City on a publicity tour! If her numbers are to be believed–309 kills, 36 of them enemy snipers–she far outdoes the American record although I understand all those numbers are shaky and the real totals all around are probably much higher.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDO6n7GuslA

    She does not look like someone who’s husband was killed in fighting and who was herself wounded four times. She actually looks like a cheerful housewife–bordering on a babushka (grandma?). She said that she was astounded by the questions of American reporters especially one who said that her uniform dress made her look fat. I guess the crass behavior of the press goes back a ways. Now taking a look at this issue myself, I would have to agree that the dress was not flattering and did make her look a bit chunky….but I wouldn’t have told her so.

    Here is a woman veteran sniper of WW II.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n03qqmEzhis

    That pistol stance is pretty weird with the one elbow supported on the table, but she makes it work. The way she handles that Makarov is proof positive that the women snipers were not to be harassed.

    Watching these videos together with the genre where knuckleheads force women to shoot large caliber guns that they are not trained for has made my mind boil. The last couple videos had one woman shooting a Desert Eagle that recoiled and hit her in the head, and another one had a woman shooting a Remington 742 in 30-06 and getting hit in the head with the scope to loud laughter and replays. In the midst of all this, I have come up with a fantasy. The filmmakers have their women friends replaced with Lyudmila Pavlichenko who really shows them how to shoot. It gets better. They are placed in a sniping contest with her that is carried out with paintball–or better yet, rubber bullets from real guns–and emerge all black and blue.

    B.B., that’s quite a statement that the Mosin is comparable to the Springfield in accuracy. I believe there was some contingent of Americans fighting in Russia at the end of World War I (name of Polar Bears?). These guys were armed with Mosins and detested them compared to Springfields and Enfields. Maybe weapons are dependent on circumstances. The word is that Russians did not like the weapons they were given in Lend-Lease deals, just the trucks. They preferred their own tanks and submachine guns. On the other hand, they were fairly positive about the Brewster Buffalo that was detested by American pilots after Midway.

    I am continuing to build my fantasy Mosin. Huber match trigger, Sierra MatchKing bullets and now the Pachmayr Decelerator recoil pad which adds length of pull and makes an military surplus gun a joy to shoot!

    Matt61


    • Matt

      Are you speaking of my propensity for mugging the elderly? Look, I told you before I need the money and I don’t like a fair fight. πŸ˜‰

      Thanks for the video link. I was particularly drawn to the image of Roza Yegorovna Shanina at about 1:26. She was a striking woman indeed. ( a mere 54 kills ) For some reason Russian tennis players tend to be even more attractive.

      Regarding Lyudmila Michaylovna Pavlichenko, have you heard the Woody Guthrie song about her? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHKjOl9ocR0&feature=related


    • Matt

      The song is from Civil War years, it’s called by its first verse – “White army, black Baron” or by the name “Red Army is the strongest”, written in 1920. It was modifies several times (including 1941 version). Purely ideological march song, nothing to do with people’s music.

      duskwight


  6. With regards to Osama’s death… by all rational standards we acted in a fair and just manner, but I can’t get overjoyed about it. Ezekiel 3:11.


  7. Osama’s method of burial had nothing to do with respect for him and was not for his benefit but for the world’s Muslims. The intent was to minimize Muslim backlash, which we have as yet to see.
    -Chuck


  8. Connor,
    Congratulations for taking first place out of 28 entries in the airgunarena bench rest competition!!!!
    Wow!! Crosman 1377 Carbine using Gamo Match Score 285/300
    I see you also took 6th w/Crosman Raven and 8th w/Red Ryder

    Me? 7th place. A measly 242/300, but I’m gaining.
    -Chuck



  9. I sincerely hope that the 72 Virgins allotted the recently-departed OBL are virgin, sow pigs.

    My next best suggestion was to put him in a meat grinder with 72 picnic hams.

    I shall remember him every time I have a BLT for a while. . . .

    This was certainly a joint operation with contributons from all over the Intelligence and Military community, with ARMY Special Air driving the SEALS to the Pakistani bus stop, no doubt under the many watchful eyes of circling fighters, various -135 platforms, drones, and a satellite or two.

    Was fortunate to know a few SEALS when I lived in JAX in the late Reagan 80’s. My favorite remark was my friend swore ,’ I’ll kick the next a%%%%%e’s butt who goes with that line about being unnatural to jump out of perfectly good airplane . . . . . . now, just HOW UNNATURAL is it to SWIM out of a PERFECTLY GOOD SUBMARINE ?!?!?!?!?’.


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