SigAir Super Target: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig Super Target
SigAir Super Target (photo provided courtesy Sig Sauer).

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Adjusting the trigger — first
  • Adjusting the trigger — second
  • Accuracy
  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • Let’s examine that group
  • Hobbys again
  • Sig Match Pb
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Discussion
  • R10 second try
  • Summary

Here we go, guys. Today we look at the accuracy of the new Sig Super Target single stroke pneumatic (SSP) target pistol. I’ll tell you right now that it’s accurate. But there is a lot more to cover today, so let’s begin.

Adjusting the trigger — first

Two words of advice. First — don’t adjust the trigger — at least not until you shoot the pistol a little. Second — if you do try to adjust it — GO SLOW! I know that most adjustable airgun triggers require a lot of adjustment before anything can be felt. This one is different. Please listen to BB. read more


Walther LGV Olympia: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Walther LGV Olympia
Walther’s LGV Olympia is one of the last recoiling spring piston target rifles.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Meisterkugeln
  • RWS Superdome
  • H&N Finale Light
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic
  • And then a miracle happens
  • RWS R10 Pistol
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Discussion
  • Summary
  • One last thing

Thanks for being patient. I still have more articles to be written about current airguns, but today I will address the accuracy of the Walther LGV Olympia at 10 meters. Remember — I’m doing this because I want to test the rifle with some modern pellets that weren’t around years ago. Let’s get to it.

The test

I shot the rifle off a sandbag rest at 10 meters with the airgun resting directly on the bag. The LGV is so smooth as to almost be recoilless, so a direct bag rest helps the accuracy. I shot 5 pellets at each bullseye, which is how many shots are in the test target that comes with 10-meter target rifles. I didn’t adjust the sights throughout the test. Let’s see how she did. read more


Beeman P17 air pistol: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman P17
Beeman P17 air pistol.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Falcon
  • RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic
  • Discussion 1
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Discussion 2
  • RWS R10
  • Discussion 3
  • H&N Finale Light again
  • What now?
  • Summary

Today we start looking at the accuracy of my Beeman P17 pistol. Remember — there’s still a lot more to come in this series. We started by learning how to fix and reseal the pistol, thanks to reader 45Bravo, and now we are looking at the P17 in its own right.

The test

I shot off a rest at 10 meters. The pistol was rested directly on the sandbag, as a single-stroke pneumatic has very little recoil. I shot every target in this test with open sights, which I will discuss at the end of the report. I shot just 5 shots at each 10-meter pistol target.

Sight-in

It took eight shots to sight in, where I’m normally on in two or three. I thought the pistol would be pretty close to on, but it wasn’t. And I discovered that the rear sight really moves the pellets around fast. read more


Walther LGV Olympia: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Walther LGV Olympia
Walther’s LGV Olympia is one of the last recoiling spring piston target rifles.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Velocity
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Discussion
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Scope rail?
  • Rear peep
  • Summary

Well, well. There is a lot of interest in this vintage target rifle. Some of you want to know if I plan to shoot it at 50 yards. I hadn’t planned to do that. I was planning on shooting it at 10 meters and seeing how accurate it might be when used for the thing it was created to do. But I do listen to you guys, so I’m open to exploring other things.

Velocity

Today we look at the power of this air rifle. I know it was just rebuilt when I got it and I really don’t remember much about the performance, except to tell you that Walther spring target rifles in general were never as powerful as FWBs. An FWB 300S might shoot at 640 f.p.s. A Walther tops out at 575-600 f.p.s., as I recall. read more


Diana 35: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 35
Diana 35 pellet rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Falcon pellets group 1
  • Falcon group 2
  • Falcon group 3
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellet
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Falcons with a different hold
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the freshly lube-tuned Diana 35. This is going to be a good one!

The test

I shot off a sandbag rest at 10 meters, using the rifle’s open sights. I used three different variations of the artillery hold that I’ll describe as we go. I shot 5-shot groups, just so I could stay fresh for all the targets I planned to shoot. Let’s go!

Falcon pellets group 1

I shot the first target with Air Arms Falcon pellets because they had been the most accurate back in Part 3. After the first shot I looked at the target through my spotting scope that’s a pair of MeoStar 10X42 binoculars. For close distance these binos are quicker to set up and all that I need. read more


Diana model 26 breakbarrel air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 26
The Diana 26 air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Falcons
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • RWS Superdome
  • Trigger is great!
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Match Green
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm head
  • The final test
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Diana 26 I have been testing. Two things are different about this air rifle. It’s a Diana 26, which I didn’t hear of until recently and it’s a .177, which I haven’t had much luck with. So I chose 7 different pellets, in hopes of finding one or more than were accurate.

The test

I shot from 10 meters off a bench using the artillery hold, though I had to hold the rifle tighter than normal because the butt is so slippery against my shoulder. I shot 5-shot groups to speed things up, but decided I would shoot a final 10-shot group with the pellet that was most accurate. read more


Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

TR5
Air Venturi TR5 repeating pellet rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Something’s coming!
  • A target rifle?
  • RWS Hobby
  • Discussion
  • Trigger
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Pressing in the pellets
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Summary

Today I test the velocity of the new Air Venturi TR5 Multi-Shot Target Air Rifle. Reader GunFun1 has been chomping at the bit to talk about this air rifle, but he has restrained himself until I reported on it. Today I will talk about the power you can expect from a factory gun. I know from reading the comments that you readers are way ahead of me in this discussion, but I have purposely avoided reading your comments, as I didn’t want them to color my opinion of the gun.

Sometimes when I test a new (to me) airgun I read up on it before I start testing. Most of the time, though, I don’t do that. I want to experience the airgun exactly as a first-time buyer would. Not everyone reads this blog, and, of those who do, not everyone tunes and modifies their airguns. Some readers just shoot the guns the way they receive them, and I want them to know what they can expect. read more