Kral Puncher Breaker Silent Synthetic .177 PCP repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Kral Puncher Breaker rifle
Kral Puncher Breaker bullpup with synthetic stock.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Magazines are easier to load
  • Crosman Premier Lights — low power
  • Crosman Premier Lights — medium power
  • Crosman Premier Lights — high power
  • Discussion
  • High velocity
  • Max power
  • Trigger pull
  • Next

Today we test the velocity of the Kral Puncher Breaker Silent Synthetic bullpup rifle. Let’s begin.

Magazines are easier to load

I found the two magazines that came with this rifle MUCH easier to load and manage than the mags I tested with the.22 caliber Kral Puncher Pro rifle last year. That one gave me numerous failures to feed in the velocity test. This one was perfect! And, when I say one, I mean that I tested both mags. It also loads easier, because I think the spring in the mag may be lighter. At least that’s how it feels.

Crosman Premier Lights — low power

I used the Crosman Premier Light pellet, to test the range of power adjustments. I started with 10 pellets at the lowest setting. They averaged 356 f.p.s., which is very slow. The low was 349 and the high was 365 f.p.s. — a spread of 16 f.p.s. That’s pretty tight for the absolute lowest power setting.

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The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Sorted pellets
  • Sorting RWS Meisterkugeln
  • Pre-test work
  • Another teat?
  • Modifications?
  • Back to the test
  • 4.55 Premier
  • 4.56 Premier
  • The test changes
  • Deep seated again
  • Meisterkugeln with 4.54mm heads
  • Discussion

Today I will conduct the accuracy tests of the Beeman P1 that you readers requested. There’s a lot of ground to cover, so let’s begin.

Sorted pellets

Based on the fliers I was getting in Part 6, you asked me to sort the pellets by head size. I chose the Crosman Premier 7.9-grain pellet and the RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle pellet for this test, because they both performed the best in the last accuracy test.

I used the PelletGage to sort pellets by head size. Premiers were first, and I discovered their heads ranged from 4.54mm to larger than 4.56mm, which is the largest hole on my gage. Most were either 4.55 or 4.56mm, with 4.56mm being the most common.

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Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Crosman Premier Lights
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Crosman 100 multi pump and I had to get out the trime! If you have been reading the blog for more than half a year, you know what that means. If not, you will.

The test

The test was at 10 meters indoors with the rifle resting on a sandbag rest. I shot 5-shot groups today because the 100 is a multi pump. I pumped 4 times for every shot. I said in the last report I was going to pump 5 times per shot, but after examining the velocity figures I felt 4 pumps were enough. Because I only shot 5-shot groups, I tried 4 different pellets, and when you see the results you’ll be glad that I did! Five shots are a fair indicator of accuracy. They are not as conclusive as 10 shots, but in a pinch they will do.

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The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Disassembly
  • Cleaning
  • Lubrication and assembly
  • Velocity — RWS Hobby pellets
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Crosman Premier Light
  • Discussion
  • What comes next?

Today is a big day. I cleaned the Tune in a Tube (TIAT) grease out of the Beeman P1 we are testing and lubricated it with plain white lithium grease. This will tell us whether TIAT is wrong for an air pistol like the P1 and also whether the pistol I’m testing is still in good shape.

Disassembly

I had the pistol apart and ready to clean in 15 minutes. The directions I gave you in Part 4 work perfectly. I’m not showing any pictures of that today because Part 4 nailed it.

Cleaning

I will say this, TIAT is very sticky stuff! It took longer to clean than I anticipated. Everything had to be wiped dry. That stuff really clings! All I did was wipe it all away with paper towels so the gun was dry and ready for the new grease.

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Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • How much was it?
  • How I know it holds
  • The tests
  • Test 1 — Crosman Premier lights
  • Test 2
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellet
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Trigger pull
  • Power adjustability
  • Loading is hard
  • Summary

How much was it?

Before I jump into today’s report, which is on the velocity of the Crosman 100, I want to make a comment on the price. I paid $150 for this one. It has just been refinished and the powerplant was overhauled — I think. Even if it wasn’t overhauled, it holds air for months (I’ll explain how I know that), so it’s the same thing.

Remember how rare I said these are? I see one for every hundred 101s (the .22 caliber version) at airgun shows. A nice 101 will run about $125-150, so I don’t think it’s too much to pay for the far rarer .177 version. Sure you will stumble into fantastic deals from time to time, but on any given day at a good airgun show, this is about what one of these will cost. They cost that much in the late 1990s, so the price isn’t being driven by inflation.

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The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Smoothing makes a difference
  • RWS Superdome
  • Experience so far
  • Crosman Premier 7.9-grain pellets
  • RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle
  • Summary

Today we are back with the Beeman P1 air pistol I disassembled and lubricated in Parts 4 and 5. I said at the end of that job that I felt the gun was behaving like it had just been tuned, so instead of doing the velocity test next I would shoot it for accuracy. That would give it a chance to break in a little before velocity testing. Today is the accuracy test.

The test

I shot the pistol off a rest at 10 meters, using a 2-hand hold. My hands rested on the bag and the pistol did not touch it. I intentionally did not read the first accuracy test before shooting because I wanted to test this pistol without any bias. I also did something that I thought was very clever. Then I discovered that I had done it in the first accuracy test, as well. Oh, well, when you are old like me, everything is new each day!

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Crosman 2400KT CO2 Air Rifle – Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This is Part 9 of an ongoing guest blog from reader HiveSeeker. He continues to research this subject that fascinates both him and many other readers.

This is about the air rifle he really enjoys. If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now, over to you, HiveSeeker.

Crosman 2400KT CO2 Air Rifle – Part 9

By HiveSeeker

2400KT
The 2400KT CO2 Air Rifle is only available directly from the Crosman Custom Shop. The cost of this custom gun, the HiveSeeker II with 14.6-inch Lothar Walther .22 barrel and shoulder stock, was $128, not including the scope and rings. The scope is a Leapers 3-12X44 AO SWAT Compact.

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