Umarex Forge combo: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Forge
Umarex Forge.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Trigger
  • The test
  • Accuracy — JSB Exact RS
  • Accuracy— JSB Exact Heavy
  • Accuracy— Crosman Premier Light
  • What next?
  • Final group
  • Evaluation
  • Summary

Today I complete the report on the Forge from Umarex. This is a breakbarrel rifle with a gas spring and … Well, you can read the past posts to catch up.

I’m running this test because the last time we looked at the Forge I felt the poor 4X32 scope that was provided with it might not have extracted all the accuracy the rifle can produce. I vowed to return and test it with a better scope and today the Force is mounted with the Aeon 8-32 AO scope with trajectory reticle, which is one of the best scopes I own. You can read about it here.

The test

This will be 10 shots with each pellet from a rested rifle at 25 yards. I started with the conventional artillery hold but soon discovered the Forge can be rested directly on the sandbag. I used the artillery hold in the last test, so that may make a difference today. read more


Benjamin Trail Nitro Piston Mark II pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin Trail NP MkII
Benjamin Trail NP Mark II air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Adjustable trigger
  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Aiming
  • RWS Hobby
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Additional testing
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Benjamin Trail Nitro Piston Mark II with the factory-mounted open sights. But before we get to that, there is some old business to clear up.

Adjustable trigger

There was quite a bit of interest in the adjustable trigger last time — mostly because I showed that I could not get a screwdriver on it to adjust. There was so much interest that I vowed to try to adjust it for this report.

I removed the barreled action from the stock. All it took was removing the 4 stock screws and lifting the action out of the grip/stock. The safety button fell out at the same time. read more


Benjamin Trail Nitro Piston Mark II pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Train NP II
Benjamin Trail NP Mark II air pistol.

This report covers:

  • The detent and how I open the gun
  • Velocity
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Discussion
  • Cocking effort
  • Discharge sound
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

The detent and how I open the gun

I’ll start today’s report by answering reader Siraniko’s questions from the last post. He asked me to show the locking detent and how I manage to open the gun for cocking. Here’s the detent.

Benjamin Trail detent
The chisel detent is long and narrow. It’s not under that much spring tension, so it opens easily, but the shallow angle of the slope ensures that it locks the beech securely.

That detent chisel face is long and shallow but the spring is not that strong. I can push it in with my finger. So the long shallow slope of the chisel on the detent is what’s keeping the breech locked so tight. read more


Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman PCP
Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • 2018 Texas Airgun Show
  • Velocity day
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • Discussion 1
  • Hang in there
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Super heavyweight pellet
  • Loud
  • Trigger pull
  • Discussion 2
  • Summary

2018 Texas Airgun Show

The 2018 Texas Airgun Show is approaching fast. It’s on Saturday, June 23. The hall is already filled with dealers and they are now selling spaces on the veranda outside. There are new private vendors attending this year, plus the prizes and giveaways have increased! Pyramyd Air has donated a TX200 Mark III for the raffle! They also donated 20 John Wayne Lil Duke BB guns that we are planning for a special giveaway just for kids. This is the most active selling and shooting airgun show in the country, and if you have always wanted to see a show, this would be the one to attend. read more


Gimmicks — what works, what doesn’t and why?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Takedown rifle
  • What am I saying?
  • Whiscombe
  • Takedown guns that work
  • Same caliber for pistol and rifle
  • The truth
  • Dual fuel airguns
  • Cocks on opening AND closing!
  • What else?

Sometimes an idea for a blog just overwhelms me. Today is such a time.

Takedown rifle

I was reading about a takedown AR in the May edition of Firearms News. This 5.56mm rifle breaks down to three pieces that are less than 18 inches long, and it even comes with a backpack to carry it. I scanned the article and it seemed like a great idea — until it hit me. I have been down this road before and it leads nowhere! Takedown rifles do not function the way most people think.

The author showed several targets that seemed reasonable for an AR. Now, ARs are not that accurate, as everyone who shoots them is aware. They are good for five shots in 2 inches at 100 yards and good ones can do a little better, but accuracy is not their strong suit — anymore than it is the strength of an AK. The author showed a 4-inch group of five at 200 yards, which is very good for an AR. He also showed a 1-1/4-inch group of three at 100 yards. Okay — three shots is a modern gun writer’s way of fudging the truth. A rifle that can put 3 in to 1-1/4-inches will put 10 into 2.5 inches. That is the real accuracy of the rifle. Still, for an AR it’s not that bad. read more


The Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump pneumatic rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump air rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • The focus
  • Pumping
  • Pump effort
  • Velocity
  • Test 1. Crosman Premier lite
  • Test 2. Crosman Premier lite
  • Test 3. Two other pellets
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • RWS Hobby
  • Seating pellets
  • Pump lever noise
  • Storing the rifle with air
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump rifle. There certainly is a lot of interest in this air rifle. Some have noted its similarity with the Diana Stormrider and wonder if the Dragonfly can be considered a precharged pneumatic with a built-in pump. Others are quick to point out this rifle is made in China by Snow Peak Airguns (SPA).

Several readers could not envision the pump arm of the rifle from the picture I posted, so here is a side view.

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly side view.

The focus

While it’s nice to know the lineage of the rifle, my interest is how well the Dragonfly performs. Reader Benji-Don sent me his impressions of the rifle, which I will start sharing with you today. This is velocity day, so that’s where we will start. read more


Umarex Strike Point multi-pump pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Strike Point
Umarex Strike Point multi-pump pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • The sights
  • RWS Superdome
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • RWS HyperMax
  • Crosman Premier light
  • RWS Hobby
  • Evaluation

Today we test the accuracy of the new Umarex Strike Point multi-pump pistol. This test is the one we have all been waiting to see. The Strike Point is firmly in competition with the  Crosman 1377, and we want to know how it stacks up downrange.

The test

I shot from 10 meters off a sandbag rest. I shot 5 shots per target because this is a multi-pump. If any pellet grouped well, I would shoot another 10 shots with that pellet. I pumped the gun 4 times per shot, because the velocity test indicated that would be okay.

Sig Match Ballistic Alloy

The first pellet I tested was the Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellet. It wasn’t tested in the velocity test, but this pellet has proved remarkably accurate in many airguns and I thought it deserved a test. Five pellets went into a 2.922-inch group. I’m not showing the dime in this photo because it makes no sense. This is a huge group for 10 meters! Also I noticed that 4 of the five pellet holes showed some tipping of the pellet as it passed through the target. read more