Umarex Gauntlet: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gauntlet
Umarex Gauntlet.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Other items I’m testing
  • Mounting the P.O.I. rings
  • Precision is challenging
  • P.O.I. rings are precision-bored
  • Bug Busters are difficult to position
  • Perfect scope for the Gauntlet
  • Sight-in
  • Shim under the scope
  • Second sight-in
  • Magazine problem!
  • Found it!
  • Summary
  • Evaluation

What a report this is going to be! So many landmark issues resolved and explained!

Other items I’m testing

Although today is about the Umarex Gauntlet, I’m also going to cover the UTG P.O.I. rings for airguns, the new Bug Buster sidewheel and the new UTG 3-12X32 Bug Buster scope. This won’t be just another test day, either, because I had to solve numerous problems to get this far. In fact, although I will show you a target today, this isn’t accuracy day. That comes next time. Today we have issues to resolve. Let’s get started.

Mounting the P.O.I. rings

UTG makes the most precise scope rings I have seen. Although I have seen other scope rings that retail for $500, I have never seen a set that are any more precise as these. I wanted to use them for the remainder of the Gauntlet test, which is going to be a long one. read more


Umarex Gauntlet: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gauntlet
Umarex Gauntlet.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The Gauntlet
  • Test 1 — shot count and the power curve
  • Power
  • Impressions
  • Frequent pellet jams
  • Test 2 — different pellets
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Discharge sound
  • Evaluation

Today we will look at the Umarex Gauntlet’s velocity and shot count, but before we start I have to tell you something. Yesterday I started shooting the Sub-1 crossbow. It was fantastic! I wanted to report on it this week, but I can’t allow the week to pass without doing the Gauntlet. So many readers are awaiting my findings. And, as I told you on Monday, we have two guest blogs this week, so the Sub-1 report will wait until next week.

The Gauntlet

The Gauntlet accepts a fill to 3000 psi, which makes it sort of friendly to hand pumps. The manual doesn’t mention cocking the rifle before starting to fill, so I filled it from empty to 1000 psi with a prototype Hill hand pump. The rifle was uncocked at the start and filled immediately. I stopped at 1000 psi because this pump has no pressure gauge and it was too difficult to tell where I was. The fill nipple is opposite the pressure gauge, so I had to pick the rifle up and turn it over to see the pressure. Too much bother! read more


Where are airguns today?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Spring-piston guns
  • The price-point PCP
  • High-pressure air compressors
  • Action air pistols
  • It’s been done before
  • Airgun shows
  • Hunting
  • They’re listening now!
  • Summary

After writing 6 reports on the SHOT Show I thought it was time to look at all that has happened in airgunning in recent years. We are in a golden age of experimentation and refinement, and it’s good to stop and reflect on that for a moment.

Spring-piston guns

If you had asked me what the future of the spring gun was before I attended this SHOT Show I would have told you that everything that could be done had been done. Then, at the show, I saw not one but two novel new breakbarrels.

Crosman has their new Akura breakbarrel with the Precision Barrel Lock or PBL. It is a novel new way of locking the breech at the shot by using some of the compressed air to push a pin back into the spring tube. The rest of the rifle is a straightforward gas spring breachbarrel, but the question we have to ask is why they felt it necessary to lock the breech this way. A few other airguns use mechanical locks that are operated by the user, so there must be an advantage to locking the breech, but will we see it when I test the Akura? read more


Kral Puncher Breaker Silent Synthetic .177 PCP repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Kral Puncher Breaker rifle
Kral Puncher Breaker bullpup with synthetic stock.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Magazines are easier to load
  • Crosman Premier Lights — low power
  • Crosman Premier Lights — medium power
  • Crosman Premier Lights — high power
  • Discussion
  • High velocity
  • Max power
  • Trigger pull
  • Next

Today we test the velocity of the Kral Puncher Breaker Silent Synthetic bullpup rifle. Let’s begin.

Magazines are easier to load

I found the two magazines that came with this rifle MUCH easier to load and manage than the mags I tested with the.22 caliber Kral Puncher Pro rifle last year. That one gave me numerous failures to feed in the velocity test. This one was perfect! And, when I say one, I mean that I tested both mags. It also loads easier, because I think the spring in the mag may be lighter. At least that’s how it feels.

Crosman Premier Lights — low power

I used the Crosman Premier Light pellet, to test the range of power adjustments. I started with 10 pellets at the lowest setting. They averaged 356 f.p.s., which is very slow. The low was 349 and the high was 365 f.p.s. — a spread of 16 f.p.s. That’s pretty tight for the absolute lowest power setting. read more


The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Sorted pellets
  • Sorting RWS Meisterkugeln
  • Pre-test work
  • Another teat?
  • Modifications?
  • Back to the test
  • 4.55 Premier
  • 4.56 Premier
  • The test changes
  • Deep seated again
  • Meisterkugeln with 4.54mm heads
  • Discussion

Today I will conduct the accuracy tests of the Beeman P1 that you readers requested. There’s a lot of ground to cover, so let’s begin.

Sorted pellets

Based on the fliers I was getting in Part 6, you asked me to sort the pellets by head size. I chose the Crosman Premier 7.9-grain pellet and the RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle pellet for this test, because they both performed the best in the last accuracy test.

I used the PelletGage to sort pellets by head size. Premiers were first, and I discovered their heads ranged from 4.54mm to larger than 4.56mm, which is the largest hole on my gage. Most were either 4.55 or 4.56mm, with 4.56mm being the most common. read more


Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Crosman Premier Lights
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Crosman 100 multi pump and I had to get out the trime! If you have been reading the blog for more than half a year, you know what that means. If not, you will.

The test

The test was at 10 meters indoors with the rifle resting on a sandbag rest. I shot 5-shot groups today because the 100 is a multi pump. I pumped 4 times for every shot. I said in the last report I was going to pump 5 times per shot, but after examining the velocity figures I felt 4 pumps were enough. Because I only shot 5-shot groups, I tried 4 different pellets, and when you see the results you’ll be glad that I did! Five shots are a fair indicator of accuracy. They are not as conclusive as 10 shots, but in a pinch they will do. read more


The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Disassembly
  • Cleaning
  • Lubrication and assembly
  • Velocity — RWS Hobby pellets
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Crosman Premier Light
  • Discussion
  • What comes next?

Today is a big day. I cleaned the Tune in a Tube (TIAT) grease out of the Beeman P1 we are testing and lubricated it with plain white lithium grease. This will tell us whether TIAT is wrong for an air pistol like the P1 and also whether the pistol I’m testing is still in good shape.

Disassembly

I had the pistol apart and ready to clean in 15 minutes. The directions I gave you in Part 4 work perfectly. I’m not showing any pictures of that today because Part 4 nailed it.

Cleaning

I will say this, TIAT is very sticky stuff! It took longer to clean than I anticipated. Everything had to be wiped dry. That stuff really clings! All I did was wipe it all away with paper towels so the gun was dry and ready for the new grease. read more