by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Galahad
Air Arms Galahad PCP in walnut is a striking looking air rifle!

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • It’s a wrap
  • Constraining the possibilities
  • Filling the rifle
  • Test 1 — JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy 18.13 grains
  • Test 2 — H&N Baracuda Match pellets 21.14 grains at medium power
  • Test 3 — H&N Baracuda Match pellets 21.14 grains at high power
  • Test 4 — Dae Sung pellets 28.6 grains
  • Test 5 — JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy on power setting 3
  • Conclusion

It’s a wrap

I’ll wrap up the velocity testing of the Air Arms Galahad PCP today. This is when we find out how well it handles longer pellets. That’s always a concern when a rotary magazine is involved.

Heavier pellets are usually longer pellets, and weight is what generates energy in a pneumatic. PCPs are most effective with heavy pellets. To get the most power from this airgun you’ll want to shoot the heaviest pellet you can — as long as it is also accurate.

Tyler Patner from Pyramyd Air also told me that the Galahad does well with JSB pellets. I wanted to try them anyway because I felt they would be very accurate, but Tyler added that the 18.13-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy dome is also very consistent. He said his testing revealed a maximum spread of 15 f.p.s. over 60 shots for this pellet when the rifle was set on power level 3 — if he remembered correctly.

Constraining the possibilities

Like other highly adjustable airgun, the regulated Galahad offers more possible combinations of pellet choice, power setting and shot count than I can possibly test. So, here’s what I will do today. I will first shoot a string of the 18.13-grain JSB pellets I just mentioned on power setting 3 and record the numbers. Then I will test the other things I want to look at today (longer pellets, heavier pellets, etc.). I will finish with a final string of the first JSB pellet on the same power setting (3) and we can compare the two strings. While that may not be as controlled as my tests in Parts 2 and 3, it should be realistic. That’s the way most of you are going to use the rifle in the field. Let’s get started.

Filling the rifle

I filled the rifle to 250 bar, as indicated on the gauge of of the rifle, to start the test. I did this to illustrate a point I am about to make. I want you to take this to heart — the rifle’s gauge does not agree with the gauge on my carbon fiber air tank. The rifle’s gauge reads lower. So, I had to fill the gun to 3,800 psi (according to the gauge on my tank) to get the Galahad gauge to read 250 bar. When I did, the first 6 shots were off the power curve. They were too slow. The rifle was overfilled. But from shot number 7 on, the rifle was on the curve.

Two points to learn from this — First, even a regulated gun can be filled too high. The regulator operates inside a specific pressure envelope and if you over-fill the gun the performance will suffer. Second, gauges that are built into airguns are seldom as accurate as larger tank gauges. I happen to know from years of experience that my tank gauge is very accurate. I knew this was probably going to happen and I wanted to demonstrate it to the new readers.

Test 1 — JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy 18.13 grains

Shot……….Velocity (f.p.s.)
1………………..683
2………………..680
3………………..678
4………………..674
5………………..681
6………………..676
7………………..682
8………………..683
9………………..680
10………..……..684

This string averages 680 f.p.s. The low was 674 and the high was 684 f.p.s., so a 10 f.p.s. spread. At the average velocity this pellet generated 18.62 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle. Bear in mind the rifle is on power setting 3, which is the middle of the range.

Test 2 — H&N Baracuda Match pellets 21.14 grains at medium power

Next I tried some H&N Baracuda Match pellets. These are heavy .22 caliber pellets, and they fit into the rotary magazine fine. Since we know this rifle is extremely stable, I only tested 5 pellets at power setting 3. Let’s see how they did.

Shot……….Velocity (f.p.s.)
1………………..638
2………………..642
3………………..630
4………………..629
5………………..638

The average was 636 f.p.s. The low was 629 f.p.s. and the high was 642 f.p.s., so a spread of 13 f.p.s. At the average velocity this pellet generated 18.99 foot-pounds at the muzzle. Again, this is on power setting 3. Now let’s go up to the highest power setting of 5 and see what this same pellet will do.

Test 3 — H&N Baracuda Match pellets 21.14 grains at high power

I dialed the rifle to power setting 5. We know from earlier testing that the Galahad changes power instantly. There is no lag. When you change the power setting the first shot comes out right on the money for that setting. Many other adjustable PCPs lag for one or two shots after adjustment, but not the Galahad.

Shot……….Velocity (f.p.s.)
1………………..812
2………………..813
3………………..811
4………………..810
5………………..811

The average velocity was 811 f.p.s. The low was 810 and the high was 813 f.p.s. That’s a 3 f.p.s. spread, but remember this is only 5 shots. At the average velocity this pellet generated 30.88 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle.

est 4 — Dae Sung pellets 28.6 grains

Next I tried some Dae Sung pellets that Pyramyd Air no longer carries. These are so long that they barely fit in the magazine, but they did go in. However, when shooting them  the third shot jammed, and, while trying to clear it with the cocking lever, I double-loaded and shot two pellets. I cannot recommend this pellet for the Galahad.

My recommendation is to stop with the Baracuda pellets. They produce 31 foot-pounds on high power, which is good enough.

After the testing you have seen, I was going to shoot a string of 10 JSB pellets next, but I flubbed the test. I started on the high power (setting 5). So I shot up that mag without recording it. At this point the rifle has fired 42 shots since being filled. Twelve of those were at high power and 30 were at medium power, which is setting 3. Now, I loaded 10 more JSB Exact Jumbo Heavys to see where the rifle is.

Test 5 — JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy on power setting 3

Shot……….Velocity (f.p.s.)
1………………..681
2………………..677
3………………..691
4………………..688
5………………..690
6………………..686
7………………..691
8………………..690
9………………..687
10………..……..687

The average for shots 43 through 52 was 687 f.p.s. The spread was 14 f.p.s. If we combine the first string and this string the average for those 20 shots is 683 f.p.s. The low was 674 and the high was 691, so the spread was 17 f.p.s.

Conclusion

What you have just seen in Parts 2, 3 and 4 is an example of the most consistent and stable precharged air rifle I have ever tested. Air Arms has combined a regulator and a power adjuster to give perfect control over the power band across a huge useful fill. This rifle performs the way a lot of people think all regulated PCPs perform, but I’m telling you they usually don’t. I’ve never seen consistency like this.

It’s quiet, it has a good trigger, the power is more stable and instantly adjustable than any PCP I’ve ever tested and it gets a huge number of useful shots from a fill. Next comes accuracy. If the Galahad is accurate, and you all know my standards are very high, then it will have it all. And that will earn it the world-beater title.The Galahad is not cheap, but performance like this costs money.