Springfield Armory M1A Underlever Pellet Rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

M1A
Springfield Armory M1A.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • Scoping the M1A
  • Receiver
  • The mount
  • Just starting!
  • Why
  • Get a longer scope
  • What you’re gonna do
  • The solution
  • Shim it
  • However
  • Too much parallax
  • Summary

Well, we shot the Springfield Armory M1A pellet rifle with its factory sights in Part 4. We learned that the rifle is not fussy about the pellets you choose and also it’s pretty accurate. Today we look at mounting a scope on the rifle.

At this point I usually just wave my hands and say a few clever things and poof! — the three hours of work I did to get the report together vanishes. Not today. Today you’re kneeling in the snow beside me, holding the hubcap of our Oldsmobile sedan so I can put the lug nuts into it. I told mom I would change the blown-out tire in four minutes and she’s timing me. Look sharp, Ralphie! read more


Springfield Armory M1A Underlever Pellet Rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

M1A
Springfield Armory M1A.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight in
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Air Arms Diabolo Field Heavy
  • RWS Hobby
  • Accuracy with all pellets
  • H&N Sniper Magnum 
  • Discussion
  • Air Arms 10-shot group
  • Boxing the target
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the Springfield Armory M1A underlever pellet rifle. Today I will shoot with the sights that came on the rifle. There is a lot to do so let’s get started.

The test

I shot the rifle off a rest from 10 meters. I used an artillery hold because this rifle is powerful and does move around when it fires. I shot 5-shot groups so I could test more pellets and do more tests, as you will see.

Sight in

It took nine shots to sight in the rifle. It was initially shooting low and to the left so I had to bring it up several inches and also about an inch to the right. The manual shows using a center hold on your target which is appropriate for shooting at personnel with a military rifle. This is a pellet version of a battle rifle after all. But for shooting at bullseye targets a 6 o’clock hold is far more precise. So that’s what I did. read more


Springfield Armory M1A Underlever Pellet Rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

M1A
Springfield Armory M1A.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Reflection
  • No more RWS 34?
  • What is good power?
  • Air Arms 16-grain dome
  • Safety
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • RWS Hobby 
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

I took some time introducing you to the .22-caliber Springfield Armory M1A underlever pellet rifle, so today is when we find out how powerful it is. Before we do that, though, I’d like to reflect on the rifle in general.

Reflection

When someone asks me to recommend a good spring-piston air rifle, I default to the RWS 34. It has the power and the accuracy to do many things. Its trigger is good and its sights are, too. With a synthetic stock the 34 sells for right at $300. Although I don’t care for the shape of the synthetic stock, this is the least expensive spring piston air rifle I can recommend. read more


Springfield Armory M1A Underlever Pellet Rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

M1A
Springfield Armory M1A.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Firing behavior
  • Loading
  • Sights
  • Sight history
  • Front sight
  • Cocking effort
  • Operating rod handle is for show
  • Scope base
  • Summary

There was lots of interest in the new Springfield Armory M1A rifle. It’s a nice-looking lookalike. It’s a decently powerful springer. It’s an underlever, and yes, there are folks who like that feature over all the others. It has other features that I’ll get into today, Like I said at the end of Part 1, velocity testing will have to wait for Part 3.

The trigger

The trigger is two-stage and not adjustable. There are no screws in sight when you peer deep inside. Stage one on the rifle I’m testing is heavy and a bit creepy. Stage two is hard to feel, with the result that at present the trigger feels like a light single-stage trigger. I think as the rifle breaks in the first and second stages will become more distinct. read more


Be glad you’re an airgunner

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • We had fun
  • Ammo shortage?
  • Prepper
  • Why am I telling you this?
  • An historical aside
  • The point
  • What’s more
  • One last remark

A week ago Friday and again last Friday I took my neighbor Denny to the range to shoot his new 9mm carry pistol. I took seveal of my own 9mm pistols too, just for fun. 

We had fun!

I have not been to my gun range in 18 months! I was so rusty and out of practice at shooting a firearm that it was good to get back in the saddle. But while we were at the range Denny told me he had to go to the sporting goods store the minute they opened and he stood in a line to get his 9MM ammo. He was limited to just 300 rounds of 9mm and it cost him nearly $60!!!

I was flabbergasted. You see — I don’t listen to the news. Never have. I don’t like being lied to, and 40 years ago I discovered that was all they were doing, so I quit watching. Whenever I catch a snippet of a broadcast these days I can see that they run nothing else but grossly slanted lies. read more


What is the attraction of replica airguns?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Today’s report
  • HOWEVER
  • Taste
  • Replicas used for training
  • And, there is more!
  • Engraved Colt Single Action
  • And then…
  • One more reason
  • Summary

Before I begin let me tell you that I won a Slavia 618 in an Ebay auction and it is on it’s way to me now. I bought it because so many readers have talked about that model over the years and I have never even shot one. In my youth I owned a Slavia 621 (622?) breakbarrel for a short time. I found nothing outstanding about it and it eventually got away from me.

Many years later I acquired a Slavia 631 that I did like and shoot a lot. But it had a hinky automatic safety that turned me off so much that I — well, the truth be told, I don’t know what happened to that rifle. For all I know I may still have it laying around somewhere. You can read about it in a 2011 two-part report than was supposed to have a part 3 that never got written. read more


Diana Mauser K98 PCP rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Mauser
Diana Mauser K98 PCP.

This report covers:

  • Another great one?
  • History
  • Sights
  • This PCP
  • Fill
  • Repeater
  • Lightweight
  • Realism
  • Adjustable trigger
  • Oh, yes they did!
  • Stuff in the box
  • What do we have?
  • Summary

BB’s going to rant, just a little. We airgunners ask for realistic replica airguns all the time, and then we gripe because they are TOO real! I don’t know if you remember, but I was so impressed by the spring-piston Diana K98 air rifle that I bought the test gun. I knew it was a re-skinned Diana 460 Magnum — a springer I don’t particularly enjoy for its hard cocking — but the realism of that re-skinned rifle was and is astounding.

Another great one?

Well, having just pulled the Diana Mauser K98 PCP rifle out of the box I have to say that I believe Diana has done it again. This K98 PCP is very realistic. So I did something I usually avoid. I read the reviews. There were only two and both of them criticized one of the most realistic parts of the rifle — the rear sight! They were upset that it doesn’t adjust for windage! Well — guess what? The rear sight on the K98 firearm also does not adjust for windage! What did you expect — a Corvette that has 4 doors and a cargo hatch so you can store your groceries better? Come on, guys — a Corvette is a sports car and a K98 Mauser is a battle rifle from World War II. I guess the only thing that would be funnier would be to watch an airgunner pull the trigger on an 8mm K98 firearm and learn what real recoil is! I can tell you this — I had to get rid of my M48 Yugo Mauser because I could not take that kick! Okay, the rant is over. read more