The Benjamin Bulldog big bore air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

  • The bullets
  • At the range
  • Velocity with Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets
  • Tin Starr 103-grain semi-wadcutter
  • A funny thing happened
  • 158-grain .358 semi-wadcutter
  • How loud is it?
  • Trigger-pull
  • New bullets to try
  • Thanks to Pyramyd Air
  • Evaluation so far
  • One last thing

Time to let the Bulldog bark! Today, I’m testing the Benjamin Bulldog velocity with a couple different rounds. And some interesting things happen!

As I said in Part 1, the Benjamin Bulldog is not a rifle you can test indoors. Even with its shroud, it has to be loud, so I waited to test it at my outdoor rifle range. Also, I would never test an airgun this powerful in my house.

The bullets

The Bulldog is listed as a .357-caliber rifle, so I took several different bullets for this test. Crosman sent me several boxes of their 145-grain Benjamin Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets, which are lead bullets with a red polymer tip that forms a pointed nose. I knew they were great big bore bullets from when I tested the Rogue.

I also took a 103-grain pure-lead semi-wadcutter bullet made by Tin Starr bullets. This bullet is shot as-cast, without sizing, and measures 0.358-0.359 inches in diameter. Because it’s pure lead, it’ll fairly easily size itself in the rifle’s bore. I shoot all my soft lead bullets in my Quackenbush rifles as-cast in exactly the same way — slightly oversized for the bore.

The other bullet I tested was a 158-grain cast semi-wadcutter that’s cast from lead hardened with antimony. These are sized to 0.3585 inches. I used them to see what the upper power limits are for the rifle. This bullet was one I didn’t know about, because it’s a hard-cast bullet. But since I had them on hand, I decided to give them a try.

Benjamin Bulldog bullets
The 3 bullets I tested in the Bulldog. From the left: 103-grain semi-wadcutter, 145-grain Nosler and 158-grain hard-cast semi-wadcutter.

At the range

I’m normally the only shooter at the rifle range, because I go very early in the morning. But on this day, another shooter arrived and set up on the same range where I was shooting. The range has a roof over the firing positions that overhangs the benches by about 6 feet, which means the chronograph has to be set out in front of this overhang to let the skyscreens see the clear sky. I normally step out ahead of the firing line and stand on the range to chronograph when I’m alone. Because of the second shooter on this day, I couldn’t do that. So, the Shooting Chrony was put out into the sunshine, and I stayed back behind the firing line. I was about 10 feet from the chrony for each shot, which should not affect the velocity that much. If I had been using my Oehler chronograph, there is a 15-foot wire between the chrono and the skyscreens, but on this day I had only the Shooting Chrony.

Velocity with the Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets

I filled the rifle to 3,000 psi and loaded 5 Benjamin Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets into the magazine. They just fit the mag for length, but everything worked exactly as it’s supposed to.

One comment on loading is the magazine has to be held in place to load each bullet. The rotary cylinder is under spring tension and wants to snap back to the last loaded bullet unless you hold it with your fingers. I’ve filmed this to show you what I’m talking about.

Shot….Velocity
1………….744
2………….746
3………….743
4………….719
5………….727
6………….703
7………….689
8………….670
9………….664
10………..646

This string works out to an average 705 f.p.s. for the 10 shots. If I stop at just 5 shots, which is one magazine, the average is 736 f.p.s. At that speed (736 f.p.s.), the average energy for this bullet is 174.45 foot-pounds. Using the 10-shot average of 705 f.p.s., the energy is 160.07 foot-pounds. I think this is very close to Crosman’s energy predictions. They say to expect an average 170 foot pounds for 10 shots with this bullet in the manual. At the end of 10 shots, the air reservoir held 2,200 psi.

I’m betting this bullet is also going to be accurate. Just for the record, I measured its diameter at exactly 0.357 inches.

Benjamin Bulldog Nosler bullet

The Nosler Ballistic Tip bullet measures exactly 0.357 inches.

Tin Starr 103-grain semi-wadcutter

Next up was a semi-wadcutter from Tin Starr bullets. This one is cast in pure lead, so it’s very soft. I found in the test of the AirForce Texan that big bores like pure-lead bullets a lot.

Once more, the rifle was filled to 3,000 psi. I left the plastic cover off the fill nipple to speed up the fills; but if I were hunting, I’d cover it every time, because you don’t want dirt in the nipple. Knowing Crosman, I bet they’ve installed an inline filter to trap the dirt, but there’s no need to get that filter dirty if you don’t have to.

Shot…….Velocity
1………….832
2………….812
3………….810
4………….803
5………….792
6………….780
7………….762
8………….749
9………….743
10………..714

The average for the first 5 shots was 808 f.p.s., which computes a muzzle energy of 149.35 foot pounds. The average for 10 shots was 779 f.p.s., for an energy of 138.83 foot pounds. That’s still enough power for coyotes and similar-sized game animals.

A funny thing happened

On the 7th shot in this string, I noticed that the chronograph spun to the right on its stand. I figured it was just the powerful air blast from the gun that caused it to spin; because every time the gun fired, the chronograph was shaking a little from the blast. I was able to complete that string where the chronograph ended up, but afterwards I called a cold range and went out to straighten it. That’s when I discovered that my bullet had blasted through the second skyscreen and ripped open the aluminum chronograph case.

Benjamin Bulldog chronograph
One bullet did this damage to the second skyscreen on my Shooting Chrony.

I call that a funny thing, and yet it didn’t seem so at the time. It isn’t the rifle’s fault because I was shooting without sights and trying to keep the bullets as close to the skyscreens as possible. This one just got too close!

But the tough Shooting Chrony kept right on recording the shots. Although I’d damaged the black plastic walls around skyscreen two and also peeled open the aluminum case, the skyscreen was left intact. It won’t filter out stray light beams anymore, but this day was overcast, so things could continue.

158-grain .358 semi-wadcutter

Next up was a 158-grain semi-wadcutter bullet that I used in the test of the Benjamin Rogue.This bullet loaded very hard, which made me think it was too hard for the Bulldog. I knew it wasn’t too large because it’s only 0.358 inches in diameter, and I’d just fired the 103-grain bullet — which was even larger. That bullet fed and fired just fine.

This bullet is a hard-lead bullet meant for pistol ammunition like a .357 Magnum cartridge. I think it’s too hard to be used in the Bulldog, because it would not fire from the rifle. Big bore airguns don’t like hard-cast bullets because they’re too diffuclt for the rifling to engrave. I tried to shoot it twice and nothing happened, so it had to be removed from the bore with a rod. I didn’t have a rod strong enough to do the job at the range. Fortunately, it was the last bullet I was going to try, so this test was over.

How loud is it?

The question of how loud the Bulldog is was finally resolved on this day. I removed my electronic hearing protectors and listened to a shot. I would rate it as a 4.5 on the Pyramyd Air noise scale. This is an airgun you are going to hear every time it fires. You probably don’t need hearing protection unless you’re going to shoot the rifle lots of times, but it definitely isn’t an airgun for a small suburban backyard. And, given the power it develops, we really don’t want to shoot it there, anyhow.

Trigger-pull

I forgot to take my trigger-pull gauge to the range for this test, so that will have to wait until Part 3. I’m definitely not going to shoot this inside my house. I will say that the trigger seems crisp and light enough for a hunting rifle, but I promise to measure it for you next time.

New bullets to try

Several days after the range test, I acquired 4 new bullets from Tin Starr to try in the Bulldog. They’re all cast in pure lead, so I know they’ll function fine in the rifle. I plan to shoot them for accuracy; and if any are accurate, I’ll chronograph them for you.

Benjamin Bulldog new bullets
From the left: 105-grain truncated cone, 130-grain round nose flat point, 125-grain round nose (also with flat point) and 158-grain round nose. All are cast in pure lead.

Evaluation so far

The Bulldog is performing exactly as Crosman said it would. Sticking that one bullet in the barrel was my fault, and I won’t try to shoot hard lead bullets in it again.

One last thing

I said last time that I would show where the Bulldog sidelever goes on the left side of the receiver. Here’s a picture of the slot with a rubber cover.

Benjamin Bulldog sidelever switch
To change the sidelever from the right to left side of the receiver, remove this rubber cover and exchange the lever parts.

Crosman sent me the latest copy of the changeover instructions. They’re not finalized, so I won’t show them here, but they appear to be straightforward — but quite involved. Crosman does want the sidelever to be changed at a service station or by their technical people, so ask for that service when you order the gun from Pyramyd Air.

Thanks to Pyramyd Air

Edith ordered a new chronograph; but when Pyramyd Air learned what had happened, they waived payment and just replaced the instrument for free. Of course, I was told that I’d be getting some tips on how to use a chronograph. When you mess up, you know some kind of ribbing is coming.

Accuracy testing is next, and I’ll begin at 50 yards. I can’t wait!

147 thoughts on “The Benjamin Bulldog big bore air rifle: Part 2

  1. I’ve been using the Chrony since it was introduced. I even bought it to chronograph an air rifle. One of things I learned was it performs better with the projectiles moving closer to the white screens that go over the Chrony. I tried explaining it to a friend of mine, but he thought it should be as close to the top of the sensor as possible. He hit it, fortunately, I have the clear protectors that fit over the sensors to protect them from muzzle blast and pellets. The front cover still has a glancing dent in it where he hit it with 9mm bullet from a Glock 17. A little lower and it would have been finished. The clear cover offered enough protection to save it. They are not too expensive and are very tough and functional. I bought them after one chronograph session with a .220 Swift. At ten feet the muzzle blast, peeled off the plastic label from the front of the Chrony. Their performance with the handgun hit was a bonus…


    • JCK,

      I have not ever read or heard that about shooting closer to the skyscreens. I suppose that the larger projectile of a firearm would make that possible. I just got the Chrony and plan to make a .125 steel or maybe a.125 alum. full front, under and rear 1 pc. protector.


      • Chris, USA,

        If you want a shield to protect your chrony consider using a block of clear lexan (minimum of 1/2″ thick) set in front of your chrony at an angle away from you.

        Clear lexan so you can still see the chrony readings. Tilted/angled away from you to minimize the chance of richochets back at you.

        kevin


        • Kevin,

          Just made the .125 alum. model today, that I mentioned above. Front is tilted. Should work fine for pellets and will get some wood or plastic rods if putting it down range to check fpe at target. Mine has the remote read feature, so the eyes are what I am protecting.


    • thanks for this test very good and clear like all your tests!!!! …i like the power of this rifle!!
      but……..why so UGLYYY!!!!!!!
      When we can see a Bulldog in the size ..,woofd nad platform of the model Marauder!!…
      no this ugly galaxian rifle..,.jaja
      thanks again!!!!!


    • Hi what happened with the sales of the “Bulldog” i want one and deessapeared like a ghost
      pyramyd says now to august i cant buy it now?¿?¡
      when im going to be able to buy it????
      Thanks


      • Lukes,

        This often happens when a new gun comes out. The makers have problems with their supply chain and it takes them time to work things out.

        It may not be as long as they are projecting, either. The people who wanted the Colt SAA were surprised when the wait was cut short by a month.

        B.B.


  2. Hey……I “customized” my chrony in a very similar style!! Although,if I recall I used a Quackenbush .25 Knave and a 70 grain Air Venturi that is no longer available.It was the classic (look thru scope & shoot window sill) technique which works well.LOL Happy 10th anniversary Tom & Edith!



    • Frank,

      let me join the chorus and say it’s good to see you still having an interest in airguns and commenting on the blog. Was hoping all was well with you.

      Not being as good a shot as BB, I “nicked” my first Chrony and took out one of the electric eyes. I’m much more careful with Chrony and shot placement now. Nice to be part of that club, sort of.

      Fred DPRoNJ



  3. “I forgot to take my trigger-pull gauge to the range for this test, so that will have to wait until Part 3. I’m definitely not going to shoot this inside my house.”

    Sorry if I’m being a bit dense here. (And I’m in no hurry in the data so its not going to bother me to wait until the next part in the least. I’m merely asking a technical question not a hurry up and test question.) Anyway… since this is a PCP wouldn’t it be possible to dry-fire the gun to test the trigger? Or am I misunderstanding something in your objection to testing the trigger at home. After all, I get that Edith wouldn’t approve of holes in the drywall if you miss/shoot through the trap, especially since that would be dangerous and might damage the hand painted, periwinkle china (bonus points if you catch the British comedy reference), but if there’s no projectile in the gun… Or is the Bulldog just that loud that shooting it indoors might alarm the neighbors. (It might help on the how loud it is to compare it to something like a .22LR from a rifle/pistol since PA’s scale is rather ambiguous.)


  4. 138 fpe and a .358″ diameter chunk of lead is sure going to put the hurt on something.

    Take a .22 caliber rim fire bullet that can shoot at around the 138 fpe mark and see what one will have the most knock down power and at a longer range.

    My vote is on the .358 Bulldog for the coyote for sure.

    And now that I’m moving out in the country I’m more interested in the big bores. Talked to the farmer neighbor and he said there is definatly a coyote problem. He warned me don’t leave a small family pet outside without keeping a eye on them. He said he already lost one Beagle to a pack of Coyote’s.

    And I’m happy to find out that him and his son shoot air guns. But I don’t know what they have yet. But he did invite me over to shoot when I get settled in. I told them about the Monsoon and the son which is around my age I’m thinking immediately said you got one of those! So I do believe they know about our kind of air guns.

    And back to the big bores. I do believe I see myself working some major overtime with the house and the idea of having a real use for a big bore.

    Hmm and I see even more overtime in the future because then I got to come up with a nice scope combination for the big bore. I already see it. A Hawke 30mm tube sidewinder scope in something like a 8-32 power.

    Watch out ground hogs and Coyote’s is all I can say.


    • Gunfun1,

      First,…Congratulations on the house !

      Got some acres? Got some woods? ‘Nuff room for your own permanant 25, 50, 75, ?100? yard range?

      Now you can graduate from mice and rats at the township properties. Coyotes,….Cool.

      I’m happy for you.

      Chris


      • Chris, USA

        First thanks a bunch.

        And yes to all of the above.

        My place 10 acres. But the farmer owns right at 1000. Woods, plowed farm land, hills and valleys and a creek and two lakes farther back in.

        All undeveloped still. Only 4 housed on all the ground. Farmers son is a little over a 1/8th mile away. Farmers house is about a 1/4 mile and then that 4th house is about a mile away.

        Probably farthest clear shot away without woods being in the way is over 400 yards. Its on a frontage road to the highway. On the other side of the highway is the townside. Some houses on that side and more the closer you get to town. And the undeveloped side I’m on has even more ground beyond the farmers ground that only has a few houses here and there.

        I’m happy. Finally feels like I will be back on the farm like when I was a kid.

        And sorry I rambled on but just happy is all I can say.


        • GF,

          Sounds great ! 10 acres is alot,..especially if you got mow very much of it. Mine is 1 acre w/75% mature woods. Can mow the grass in 1/2hr. with a push mower. Low maintenance, just the way I like it.

          Got to work,…later.

          Chris


          • Chris, USA
            Its about like where I have been living at. 2 acres to mow. But a lot less trimming at the new place.

            So no big deal. But probably going to need a 4 wheeler. Getting to old for them dirt bikes. And woods walking and hills won’t be like it use to be when I was young that’s for sure. But I know I will enjoy the nature and wild life again.


            • Gunfun
              I understand the desire for a 4 wheeler to be able to cover the grounds easier but the exercise of walking will also be of benefit for your health and physical fitness, although I am sure you get plenty of that at work with the size of the factory you work in.

              I was just thinking of the noise of the 4 wheeler spooking your quarry versus walking in being much quieter but I will say that if I had that much land I would also have to get a 4 wheeler as well.

              It makes me wish when I met my present wife she had 14 acres on the south side of a mountain that was paid for , but it was over an hours drive to my work one way and about the same to any decent grocery store with no close by quick mart as well. I could have shot anything I wanted out there as it was county with no regulation on discharge of firearms or whatever.

              Looking back now it would have been a much better choice for my present situation as I could have a 200 yard plus shooting range and it backed up to timber company land that I could have hunted as well, but I choose to be closer to town and work at the time. I am happy where I am at since it is paid for and you never know when my disability comes thru we may just look for something with more land but still closer to town as long as it will be a even swap money wise by selling this house to pay in full for the new one. But I like you would really dread the move and would have to hold at least a two month running garage sale just to thin out what would have to be moved as I can just about guaranty with all I have it would fill a full size semi trailer just to move in one step and I am sure not young enough to move some of the furniture I have that is an all oak bedroom suite that has a dresser and armoire that weigh 400 plus pound apiece.

              But you never know if the right deal comes along anything can happen.

              BD


              • BD

                You know, with that much room and a four wheeler, GF1 will have an excuse and severe temptation to stick a Chevy small block in the four wheeler ?

                twotalon


                • TT
                  how did guess what his plan were that fast and I have seen 4 wheelers with Busa and ZX 14 motors in them that were all but unrideable due the over powered to the point that they would either flip over backwards or never really have full traction at any speed or gear but what a rush of adrenalin it would be to own one.

                  What I want is the small block chevy bar stool so we can have bar stool races. Can you imagines ditting on top of a bar stool the the top of the stool was the air cleaner


                  • TT
                    Meant sitting on top or the seat as being the air cleaner of the motor and having 350 hp in a 50 pound stool way to much fun for anyone to have. but I just have a new addition to my bucket list.

                    I have a friend that is shopping for a Boss Hoss with the 502 CI big block in it since he is 300 pounds he figure he needs that extra 500 plus HP to pull his big bitt around.

                    BD


                    • BD

                      Let’s forget the air cleaner for a seat…..how about a supercharger with a VERY good safety blanket ? That shrapnel gonna hurt .

                      twotalon


                • TT
                  A blanket around a supercharger is not going to help but only allow the whole supercharger to go right up the behind what it really needs and what NHRA now mandates in that it ne strapped dowm to the cylinder heads so that it cannot leave the engine at all.

                  I was the 1975 Gatornationals in Gainesville Florida when a top fuel dragsters blower exploded from a lean misfire and it went 300 feet in the air and into the grandstands and I never saw so many people move so fast to get out of its way and luckily the only injuries was from spectators stepping all over each other to get out of its way as it did not hit anyone so that new rule was implemented just a few years after that and many more incidents of the same nature. A blanket only contaimns the parts in a mass but does not limit where and how far that mass flys .

                  BD



                    • TT
                      If I put a small block Chevy in a 4 wheeler what would I call it.

                      I know crazy fun!

                      But seriously like I said to Buldawg. It will be for relax time. I’m getting to old to try to hang on onto one of those things anymore with the throttle wide open like I use to ride.


                    • TT
                      Now that would a cool action scene for sure and he could have a Buck Rodgers rocket pack strapped on as well so when he was ejected he could just fly away out of the rvil villians grasps.


              • Buldawg
                Definatly need a 4 wheeler.

                And I get plenty of exercise at work every night. Our shop is about 300 yards long and about a 150 yards wide. I bet i run around the place 30 or more times a night. And most of the machines have catwalks or platforms that have 3 stairs to go up and down. And I got to climb up on and down under them all the time. So plenty of exercise at work.

                And now I don’t feel like going to work tonight after thinking about all that.

                So yes if I get a 4 wheeler again its going to be to hop on and relax and take a ride on and check out the scenery. The 4 wheeler will be slow down enjoy time.


                • Gunfun
                  Yea I know what you mean as I was kidding since you do get your exercise at work every day just like it was for me at Harley since we had two buildings of 200 by 150 yards on either side of the streets so add another 100 yards to walk across the street and it adds up in one day.

                  They had us wear pedometers on us for a month and most of us averaged 4 to 5 miles worth of walking a day.

                  I am looking at getting a four wheeler myself well actually two so I can take my grandson riding up on the off road trial on the mountains here. Just not at the speeds I did as a kid on dirt bikes as falling hurt to much anymore.

                  BD


                  • Buldawg
                    Definatly know what you mean about falling off one.

                    Going to hurt for a while now days.

                    When I was a kid and took a fall on a dirt bike I just hop back on and catch up to the other guys.

                    Ain’t going to be like that now.


                    • Gunfun
                      it was the same here its like the old rule of get back on the horse that bucked you off till you can stay on him. I was real good at mastering my horse until I got the 73 Yamaha SC 500 single cylinder two stroke because just as soon as you thought you had in mastered it would buck you off only instead of 50 or 60 mph it would be 80 to 100mph and it was not as easy getting back on it. I never did master it to be able to ride it WFO any where I went, still got the old girl to but I can only dream of riding it now as I would lucky to hang on for more than 5 minutes and it would most likely hurt me real bad.

                      She does bring back memories that’s for sure and these new young dirt bikers just don’t know how good they have it with 14 inches of front suspension travel and 20 inches out back.. We were lucky to have 5 up front and 4 out back. I would like to see the pro riders of today do doubles and triples on the old bikes we grew up with LOL

                      BD


                  • Buldawg
                    That old Suzuki TM 400 was a beast.

                    That RM 125 with the monoshock rearswing arm was like a toy compared to that TM400.

                    I think if I had the 400 still I would even let somebody else start it for me. That could be a pain in the butt to.

                    All I can say is I’m glad some of the 4 wheelers got electric start now days.


                    • Gunfun
                      My 500 was a bear to start especially since the kick start activated compression release was disabled because they were known to get gunked up with dirt and stick open allowing dirt and non friendly particles into the combustion chamber.
                      You started like you did an old kick start Harley by kicking thru till it was on the compression and stand up the kick start lever and put all you had into it and hope it did not kick back.

                      I had kids with 125s that always wanted to ride it and they were always told if you can start it you can ride it, needles to say everyone of them ended up face first over the handlebars after it kicked back and thru them off it.

                      Definitely glad for electric start 4 wheelers for us old geezers.

                      BD



                    • Gunfun
                      I know learned many a lesson from my 500 that’s for sure and have the scars to prove it.

                      BD


        • Hi GF1!

          Congrats on the property! I moved from suburbia to the sticks about ten years ago and absolutely love it. Sounds like you have an ideal setup with lots of space around.

          Like you, I have 10 acres, wanted more but it turns out to be plenty. Mine is mostly bush that borders on a 55 acre spring-fed beaver flood – fur, feathers and scales – got it all. Was going to hunt the property but most of the critters are on a first-name basis so I gave that up idea… If I wanted venison I could just grab a hammer, go outside and call a deer over, hardly sporting eh? The coyotes learned the hard way that it is best to keep clear – got some nice fur for my fly tying 🙂

          I am not much into cutting lawns so I have a bit of grass immediately around the house and most of the open areas are natural. I did plant a good sized area with a low growing clover that doesn’t require any maintenance. The deer and the bunnies love it. Was considering putting in a bee hive but figure that would just give the bears a reason to hang around.

          Hope the settling in goes quick and smooth!

          Vana2


          • Vana2
            Thanks.

            And I know what you mean about the animals. Haven’t hunted for a long time now.

            My wife’s nephew deer hunts so he gives us some meat every year. So that takes care of that.

            And yes the coyotes learn real quick to not show theirselfs. Very smart animals.

            And I know you talked about fly tying before. My dad use to fly fish and tie. I have some of his ties still. He fly fished for Bluegill and crappie. I do the Bluegill and Crappie fishing also but I use a regular rod and real. A little gold hook with a live cricket and a small split shot weight about a foot up from the hook. And No bobber.

            The farmer said I was more than welcome to fish the pond and lake on his property.

            So as far as air guns go it will just be mostly plinking or a little mini field target course or some paper targets. I don’t really care about hunting anymore.

            But it would be nice to have a big bore air gun for just incase purposes.

            And yes any more than 2 acres of cutting is starting to be more than I want to do even though I got a fairly good size lawn tractor.

            But yes It will be nice to have some piece and quiet. Noth’n like country liv’n. 🙂


    • GF1,

      You are definitely going to enjoy that elbow room.

      Now as far as a scope for the big bore, The brand is a good choice, but I think you might do better with a 4-16. I had a 12x Weaver on a 25-06 and would shoot groundhogs in the head at over 500 yards. Much more power than that can be difficult to deal with anywhere but at the range. True, you can crank it down, but only so far. My experience is a 3-9 or 4-12 is real nice for a mix of woods and fields. Sometimes even that is too much.


      • RR
        I had a 4-16 sidewinder on my first Monsoon and it was a very good scope.

        I’m not a high magnification shooter as you know.

        I use the higher power in a way that I don’t here people talk about. I use it as a longer distance type spotting scope. That way when I have a area I want to glass as people call it when I’m looking for a varmint or such. Then after I find it I turn back down to my lower power magnification for the shot.

        So basically there is more ways to use a scope other than shooting.



        • Gunfun1,

          One of the reasons you don’t hear people talk about glassing terrain with a scope mounted on a gun is because it’s bad practice and potentially dangerous.

          When I was a big game guide one of my rules that was posted in camp was, “If I catch you glassing terrain using the scope on your gun you will be asked to pack your bags and leave. No refund of money.”

          kevin


          • Kevin
            Really. Never ever heard that before.

            And I guess I have always been on my property. And glassing for ground hogs and coyotes. And matter of fact sqerrials.

            And I seriously would like you to explain the the bad practice and dangerous part.


            • Gunfun1,

              Rule 1 in gun safety is, Never point a gun at something you don’t intend to destroy/kill, i.e., always keep your gun pointed in a safe direction.

              Using a scope mounted on a gun for glassing violates this rule. The dangerous part is if your gun discharges while you’re glassing and you kill another person/hunter that is in the field maybe because you were surprised and startled when their image appears in your scope.

              Binoculars are for glassing not scopes mounted on a gun.

              kevin



              • I read an article by a guy who said that he has had to dive for cover when he saw someone glassing him with a scope. So, it does happen. I can see that would have liability implications for a hired guide.

                Matt61


              • Kevin,

                I think B.B. wrote about people using their rifle mounted scopes for spotting scopes here in the States. I think the topic was what should be in your range bag. A spotting scope or binoculars were near the top of the list. I think he even said in Germany checking your targets with a mounted scope would get you kicked off the range.

                David


    • Gunfun
      I just wonder if coyotes are like the crows that someone reported here on the blog that they were illegal for him to shoot in his country but that when one died they all attended the funeral.

      So I know coyotes run in packs so I am thinking they may also attend the funeral so you may want find a repeating big bore for some repeated funerals all in one day.

      I am so glad you got the house and that him and his son also shoot so maybe there will be more of a friendship formed rather than a landlord/owner relationship in time and it will make it easier with the option to buy thing after the lease is up situation.

      Now I know I am going to have to head that way sometime this year before the leaves start to fall so we can shoot till we cannot see straight anymore.

      BD


      • Buldawg
        From what I seen about coyote’s is when the shot goes off you don’t see them anymore for awhile. Even if one goes down. Their headed for the woods. Around here anyway.

        And yea it took us awhile to get things right on paper with the house. But I do believe I got a seal I couldn’t pass up.



        • Gunfun
          Yea I think you got a good deal as well and it will be worth all the hassle once the move is done and over.

          There is a pack of coyotes out along the creek on the old neighbors property that you can hear howling at times and I saw one running across the field one day but he was to far away to fast to even attempt to get a shot at and yes they do not attend their funerals like crows do .

          BD


          • Buldawg
            They can be dangerous when they are by theirselfs.

            If they are in a pack they are like feeding sharks when they are on something. Best to keep a distance when that’s going on. Talk about vicious.


            • Gunfun
              I am sure they can be dangerous by themselves and in packs but I would believe they would be less of a threat by themselves and owning and raising Staffordshire terriers ( pit bulls ) for many years in Florida I am very well aware on how stop any dog from attacking you quite easily so one coyote would not necessarily scare me but a pack is a whole different story.

              it was mid day when I saw this one making tracks back to their den so I am not sure if he had chased something and was unable to catch it or what but he was not wasting time back to his safe haven.

              BD



  5. This remark from Calin B. was lost for some reason.

    Welcome to the club, B.B.! (Actually, I suspect that you might have already been member given your many years in the shooting sports.) There are only two kinds of empirical (data-driven) shooters in the world–those who have shot their chronograph and those who will! 😉 Tell it to those gloating (but generous) folks at PA the next time you talk to them! I spent a long evening de-soldering and re-soldering a new 80 pin LCD display in my Chrony once, but I paid less than $5 for the replacement display from an online electronic components store and I didn’t want to return my unit to the factory for the repair. A pellet from a muzzleloading shotgun load had strayed more than I expected and killed my display.

    I think I can make that Chrony work as good as new, BTW. It just needs a new 3D-printed plastic housing for its rear “camera.” Don’t get all “chrony shy” on us now and impact you excellent testing and data. I’ve found that too much distance to the “skyscreens” (too high of a trajectory) can increase the string spreads and standard deviations. Yeah– the Chrony is a digital device and you might not think this could happen, but I believe it happens because the “cameras” (sensors) can “trip” at different places along the length of the projectile. If there’s good light and a good image from a low-flying projectile, each “camera” trips right on the nose of the projectile–not on the nose at one camera and somewhere else on the other camera. Raise the projectile’s path too much and watch the spreads and SDs go up too!

    >The range has a roof over the firing positions that overhangs the benches by about 6 feet, which means the >chronograph has to be set out in front of this overhang to let the skyscreens see the clear sky.

    I just learned a new trick on that new airgungurus online forum in the U.K. I have one of those “free with any purchase” LED “hockey puck” lights from Harbor Freight. It has a magnet on it. All I need to do is buy a second one (or find another coupon for a freebie) and use strong magnets to back it and hold it to the Chrony’s diffusers. Pretty clever suggestion from those Brits, eh! Like I testified above, the better the lighting, the more reliable the numbers and/or the farther away from the expensive Chrony bits one may shoot too!

    I suspect that there’s never a good reason to use anything but pure lead bullets in these airguns. In “Modern Reloading, Richard Lee advises bullet casters and reloaders to not exceed the ultimate compressive strength of the bullet alloy used, plus a little margin. His centerfire cast bullet table starts at 8 BHN (pure lead is 5 BHN). At 8 BHN, 10,261 psi is his recommended max. pressure. At 36.6 BHN (a hardness level that requires a heat treated bullet and an alloy with a good amount of antimony in it), his recommended max. pressure is 46,900 psi. I don’t know what it would be for 5 BHN, but muzzleloaders usually shoot best with pure lead and there’s no way a 3,000 psi airgun is putting anywhere near 10k psi on a bullet (or even anywhere near 3000 psi on it)! I believe the problem with harder alloys, and bullets that don’t fit bores, chambers, or forcing cones very well, is there’s not enough pressure to distort (obturate) the bullet and make it seal well. A soft pure lea!
    d bullet is probably best for both airguns and muzzleloaders (and one that fits the bore well) and maybe there’s still paper patching to play-with! 😉 I like to use a tiny dab of Lee Liquid Alox to glue the seam of my patches after cutting and rolling them onto my favorite 45 cal. muzzleloader hunting bullet, BTW and found my favorite paper is once again available online.


  6. BB, don’t you have any full wadcutter bullets (normally used on .38Spl target loads) to try on this rifle? I am really curious about the performance of a hollow-base bullet in such a rifle, because they are so common around me here. I am not sure, however, how hard they are. It is my understanding that these bullets should be soft, otherwise their hollow base design is worthless.



    • Kevin in CT,

      Wow, that is one wild looking chrony. Never seen one like that. No chance of shooting that one !

      I don’t see it working to well on a break barrel or a under lever since it attaches to the barrel.

      Chris


      • Howdy Chris, you’re right about that. I tried it on my S&W M29 6.5 inch and it held on pretty well. The guys at my club like to use it for chronoing their shotgun loads as you don’t have to worry about any strays hitting something important. It’s also very nice because you don’t need to call a cease fire to use it although it did get me some very strange looks when I first started using it.

        Kevin in CT

        PS. First Day Of Spring And We Have Snow In The Forecast….aaaccckkkkk


  7. Hello B.B.,
    It appears that the hammer energy was too high for the fill pressure from the way the velocities fall steadily. It looks like a couple hundred more psi fill pressure might bring it into balance and bring the 10 shot average energy closer to Crosmans rating. However, power isn’t everything. If I really wanted to use this gun for 10 consistent shots, I think I would reduce the hammer energy some to try to get better balance and accept lower energy.
    I think calibrations of small pressure gauges could easily be off by 200 psi.
    Won’t you be needing a short bullet to properly spin stabilize it at airgun velocities?
    I hope you will also try the JSB pellets.


  8. The very first shot I ever took over my chrony broke the plastic housing on my rear sensor. Luckily, it seems to work fine, but I learned that lesson quick!



  9. Is there any special method to remove a stuck bullet (or pellet) from a barrel? I have a co2 pistol in which I have lodged a couple of .177 pellets (finding out along the way just how many shots I could get with a co2 cartridge), but fortunately, just disassembling the gun allowed me to remove the stuck pellet, oh, and the barrel is short. My guess is that this one was stuck pretty well in your gun. Did you just use a rod down the muzzle?
    Michael in Georgia



    • Mister Rob,

      I shot one of the rods once the ricochet hit one of the upstairs bedroom windows, got lucky and the window survived undammaged. So far no other Chrony hits to report.

      David


  10. BB,
    Your article said “At the end of 10 shots, the air reservoir held 2,200 psi.”
    Why does it take so much pressure to shoot a 9mm bullet out of the barrel; I thought big bore requires more air, and NOT more air volume and pressure?

    FYI – I compare it with my .177 cal HW100, that its velocity falls off at about 1,100 psi.



      • BB,
        I understood that it takes more air to push a 9mm than a 4.5mm bullet out of the barrel, BUT why does 9mm needs more air pressure also? Perhaps you are trying to say that because Benjamin Bulldog doesn’t have an air regulator is the reason why. If this is the case, would you say that if the Benjamin Bulldog has a regulator built-in, it can continue to shoot like my HW100 until air pressure in the reservoir drop to around 1,100 psi?


        • Joe,

          I am just guessing with this answer.

          Yes, a regulated gun CAN get more shots from a charge of air. What your rifle has is a valve that operated at around 1200 psi. If there were no reg, that valve would be locked by a 3000 psi fill. But a reg drops the pressure to 1200 psi (I am guessing) and you get many more shots from one fill.

          The reason the Bulldog doesn’t get more shots is it doesn’t have a reg. But regulators cost money and they have a bad reputation for breaking down. I have never heard of one in a big bore airgun. It’s just more cost-effective and also more reliable to leave them out and balance the valve.

          I once wrote about a .25 caliber rifle I owned that operated on 800 psi air. Do you remember that? The valve was a timed valve that stayed open a long time. The gun got about 10 shots on just that low air pressure, but there was no power curve. The velocity just dropped from shot one to shot X.

          Would it be possible to build a regulator into the Bulldog? I don’t see why not. Would someone be willing to pay and extra $400 to have one (remember — they have never been built, so there is a lot of R&D necessary)? I doubt it.

          B.B.


          • BB,
            Thank you very much for a detail reply, and as always, I learnt a lot from you. Like always my curiosity get the best of me and thus I ask questions. Here I go again…
            (1) Could you give us the link to that “.25 caliber rifle (you own) that operated on 800 psi air.”?
            (2) I just don’t see how an air regulator for a 9mm airgun is any difference than the one use in a .177 cal airgun. They both regulate air pressure. I agreed that putting a regulator in this 9mm Bulldog will bump the retail price up $400 more.


            • If you take half the air out of a tank, the pressure will drop to half of the starting point.

              Let’s ignore a moving projectile for the moment and assume: 1) same size tank on the two guns, 2) same length barrel (say 20 inches), 3) same initial pressure. Visualize a sealed gate at the end of the barrel (so each “shot” will equalize the pressure in the barrel and the remaining pressure in the tank.

              .177 has a volume of just under 0.5 cubic inches
              .357 has a volume of just over 2.0 cubic inches.

              So the latter is taking 4 times as much air at any given pressure. And the tank pressure will be dropping 4 times as fast

              If the tank were, for some silly reason, just 2 cubic inches and up at 3000PSI, after one shot the .357 would have only 1500PSI left in the tank (half the air was used to fill the barrel — total volume 4 cubic inches. A second shot would end at 750PSI.

              You’d have to take 3 shots with the .177 to draw down the same 1500PSI worth of air. Pressure at end of each: 2400, 1920, 1536. This assumes no regulator — equalized pressure on both sides. Adding in a regulator really complicates the math, as the pressure on the outlet side stays constant/low as long as the inlet side is higher.

              These airguns tend to have small reservoirs (though not as small as my hypothetical example) — small enough to not require hydrostatic testing every five years (unlike my AirForce Condor, which is likely coming up on needing it — even though I’ve only cycled the tank about three or four times; mostly emptying it to transport across country)



  11. A few years back, a friend was testing an in-line muzzle loader over a Chrony. The bullet missed it but the sabot hit the read out screen right in the middle! It sure can happen.

    Mike


    • One reason to spend the extra money for the “Master” models of “Shooting Chrony”. The control head/display sits on your shooting bench, leaving only the sensors to be damaged (after you kill the Chrony, you can still recover your data)


  12. I have found you can even just lay the Harbor Freight “hockey puck” lights on top of the defuser and the Chrony will work. I don’t know how much better it would be to have it under the defuser but I will try that next. I actually have the lights that Chrony supplied for indoor shooting, but the tiny screws are missing that hold them to the defuser (I think I am the third owner — also had to have a cable made for the readout but the price was right on the Chrony — FREE). I am going to try to get screws from a local jewelry store or optometrist’s shop.


    • Cliffmeyer,

      I have a set of the indoor Chrony light and found they don’t work well mounted on top to the defuser I ended up mounting them below and they work great. I don’t have 25 yds if I set up my bench out in the sun so I have been shooting from inside the garage out towards my backstop. Now with the lights I don’t have to move my bench when I want to test a new gun or pellet with the Chrony. Never thought about using those “hockey puck” lights that would have saved a few bucks.

      David



  13. I wouldn’t shoot this kind of gun either indoors. But former reader Jane Hansen, claimed that she would shoot her high-powered firearms handguns in her basement. She had some kind of material that could absorb the force at close range. I’m not sure how she dealt with the noise, but maybe that was taken care of with the basement.

    Matt61


  14. Was this the first time you’ve “bagged a chronograph,” B.B.? If so, welcome to the club, B.B.! (Actually, I suspect that you might have already been a member, given your many years of activity in the shooting sports.) There are only two kinds of empirical (data-driven) shooters in the world–those who have shot their chronograph and those who will! 😉 Tell this to those gloating (but generous) folks at PA the next time you talk to them! I spent a long evening de-soldering and re-soldering my Chrony’s 80 pin LCD display, after a pellet from my muzzleloading shotgun strayed more than I expected. I didn’t want to return my unit to the factory for the repair and I paid less than $5 for the replacement display from an online electronic components store.

    I think I can make your wounded Chrony work as good as new, BTW. It just needs a new 3D-printed plastic housing for its rear “skyscreen” sensor and bit bit of sheet metal body work. Please don’t get all “chrony shy” on us now and impact your excellent testing and data. I’ve found that too much distance to the sensors (too high of a trajectory) can increase the string extreme spreads and standard deviations. Yes–the Chrony is a digital device and you might not think this could happen, but I believe it happens because the sensors can “trip” at different places along the length of the projectile. If there’s good light and a good image from a low-flying projectile, each sensors trips right on the nose of the projectile–not on the nose at one sensor and somewhere else on the other sensor. Raise the projectile’s path too much and watch the ESs and SDs go up too! Low as you dare to go is usually best, in my experience.

    >The range has a roof over the firing positions that overhangs the benches by about 6 feet, which means the >chronograph has to be set out in front of this overhang to let the skyscreens see the clear sky.

    I just learned a new trick on that new airgungurus online forum in the U.K. I have one of those “free with any purchase” LED “hockey puck” lights from Harbor Freight. It has a magnet on it. All I need to do is buy a second one (or find another coupon for a freebie) and use strong magnets to back it and hold it to the Chrony’s diffusers. Pretty clever suggestion from those Brits, eh! Like I testified above, the better the lighting, the more reliable the numbers and/or the farther away from the expensive Chrony bits one may shoot too!

    I suspect that there’s never a good reason to use anything but pure lead bullets in these airguns. In “Modern Reloading, Richard Lee advises bullet casters and reloaders to not exceed the ultimate compressive strength of the bullet alloy used, plus a little margin. His centerfire cast bullet table starts at 8 BHN (pure lead is 5 BHN). At 8 BHN, 10,261 psi is his recommended max. pressure. At 36.6 BHN (a hardness level that requires a heat treated bullet and an alloy with a good amount of antimony in it), his recommended max. pressure is 46,900 psi. I don’t know what it would be for 5 BHN, but muzzleloaders usually shoot best with pure lead and there’s no way a 3,000 psi airgun is putting anywhere near 10k psi on a bullet (or even anywhere near 3000 psi on it)! I believe the problem with harder alloys, and bullets that don’t fit bores, chambers, or forcing cones very well, is there’s not enough pressure to distort (obturate) the bullet and make it seal well. A soft pure lead bullet is probably best for both airguns and muzzleloaders (and one that fits the bore well) and maybe there’s still paper patching to play-with! 😉 I like to use a tiny dab of Lee Liquid Alox to glue the seam of my patches after cutting and rolling them onto my favorite 45 cal. muzzleloader hunting bullet, BTW and found my favorite paper is once again available online.


  15. BB,
    Chrony hunting is the only kind of hunting I can do well these days. 🙂

    I’m trying to understand how to find,or make. the proper soft lead solid projectile for any powerful airgun.Should I start with the land to land bore measurement, and then allow up to a 1 thousandth of an inch of bullet oversize for best fit and to allow it to take the rifling?If a sizing die’s action should be limited to 3 thousandths of an inch can that be added to the 1 thousandths overbore for a maximum total of 4 thousandths larger to start with?This is,of coarse,if I can’t find the right sized projectile in the first place.

    Tin Can Man


    • TCM,

      You have asked the question that has spawned hundreds of books. As such, the scope of the answer is too large for me to answer in my remaining lifetime.

      Measure the bore (the diameters from one groove to the other) and get a bullet that size of one thousandth over.

      B.B.


  16. So I actually did some shooting today not at my Chrony 🙂

    I mentioned a while I picked up a sett of Sports Match ATP61-30mm adjustable rings https://www.pyramydair.com/s/a/Sportsmatch_30mm_Rings_High_Adjustable_9_5_11mm_Dovetail/3508 to try on my RWS Diana 460 Magnum. Mounted my 3-12×44 UTG SWAT scope with the back ring at max height. The scope had been mounted and sighted using low UTG Weaver rings on a UTG DN460 drooper mount prior to this. First shot using 8.4 gr AA Diabolo that work well in my gun was 4″ high. These rings have the range for a gun with even more droop then my 460 that’s for sure. There is no sign of any movement of the scope and so far no sign of damage to the scope stop hole on the Diana rail. I`ll keep an eye out for signs of movement but things look rock solid after 100 rounds. How did I shoot? Best group was a 10 shot group of .613″ with 7 shots of the 10 clustered in the black at .418″. The conditions temp 33° wind 5 mph with gusts to 20 mph. So I`m pleased with these rings. 🙂

    David




      • Gunfun,

        Yeah, looks like I won’t need to drop $99 on the Bullseye ZR 1 mount after all. Thank you B.B. but you can cancel test on that bad boy no longer on my wish list. 😉

        David



          • Gunfun,

            Kidding aside I hope he figures it out also. Especially if it turns out Diana came out with the Bullseye so they didn’t have to deal with the droop issue when they designed the 340 N-TEC. I’m very interested in the 22 cal N-TEC as a pest control rifle. I have a Benji Trail NP now that I bought for that purpose and frankly need a bigger barn or something cause both my German rifles put is seriously to shame in the accuracy department. 😉
            Hope B.B. can find time to test one soon.

            David


  17. B.B.,

    Perhaps the dumbest question ever asked, but here goes……..

    I have been shooting four pellet types all winter and have documented all groups, usually 5 shots per group. At 41 feet.

    If the 4 individual types shoot a 5,10,15 and 20mm. respectavily, center to center, then it would only make sense that to “newbie” me,…that all four types will get larger groups at further yardages. “Larger” is the key word. Break in aside and skill improvement aside.

    Yes, some will hold a tighter group further out, but the bottom line,..and the question is,…that I should not expect any to get smaller?

    Thanks, Chris



      • Pa.oldman,

        Thank you. It only makes sense.

        With the weather warming up, I am ready to “stretch it’s legs” as Gunfun1 says.

        In actuality, most pellets/groups touch each other, whatever the pellet. But some do better more often, than others.

        While maybe mistaken, I think that groupings at 41′, (me), will be somewhat representative of groups further out.


        • Chris

          Your groups will get bigger with more distance, and if you shoot 10 shot groups, they will get even bigger.
          You better get on the stick….I saw 4 long toothed critters browsing the dead grass this morning on a short trip.

          twotalon


          • TT,

            Odd you mention that,…B.B. and other’s said that 10 shots are the only way to go.

            I tried it,…. odd enough,….I did a 1mm. less with 10 then I did with 5.

            Maybe just me, but as I start to shoot, things become “automatic” and I relax more….fix what I know I did wrong on the first few shots.

            This “learning curve” thing sucks! 😉




                • Chris

                  Do you have the right height rings ?
                  If you shoulder up the rifle without opening your shooting eye , get comfortable, then open your shooting eye, are you on the scope….or a little low or high ?
                  If the scope is too high or low, you are forced into a less than optimum hold to shoot. Makes it more difficult.

                  twotalon


          • TT,

            Long….toothed….critters….mmmmm,…..have yet to see my first, this year.

            Odd as it is, they come out in my yard at exactly, ( not measured ), at the same distance I have been shooting all winter. Very close.

            Still, will do sight in at 25 or 30 yds. and do hold over/ under from that.

            Chris


        • Chris,

          If I remember you have a TX what pellets have you tried? That can also make a difference in how well you shoot. If you haven’t shot Air Arms pellets through the TX order some, Gunfun turned me on to them. My HW50S love the lighter 7.33 gr Falcon Pellets and my Diana 460 Magnum loves the 8.4 gr Diabolo Field Pellets (both are 4.52mm)

          David


          • PAoldman,

            You made me get out all my pellets,……..I hate that! 😉

            HN 21.14, RWS 14.5, AA 13.43, JSB 15.89……….HN 14.66, JSB 18.13, AA 16.0

            The last 3 I just got and still have not shot much. The 15.89 seem to be best on average with the AA 13.43 close behind. Even the other 2 surprise me from time to time.

            Hope this answers your question. ( all domed)

            Chris


            • Chris,

              Your gun is a .22 I have no recommendations for pellets in that caliber. Just keep shooting and have fun now that the weather is improving (I hope) 🙂

              David




  18. Chris,

    Sorry bout that :-O
    Your groups will open as range increases but some days you will be just shooting better so today’s 20 meter groups may just blow away yesterday’s 10 meter shooting.

    David


  19. TT,

    On the above question, we ran outa’ room,…..I would say good.

    Odd though, as I shot rested all winter,…I started at the rear stop hole on the TX, then went to the middle,….now with close to 1000 shots,…I think I will move to the front stop hole.

    I find I “move back” sometimes, so, this might be an improvement. With rings centered, I have about 4mm. movement back and front. So will see.

    Chris



    • TT,

      Indoors, so no coat. “Creeping up” ? No, I would say opposite,….I move my eye back a bit sometimes to get the best sight picture. So….move the scope further out/away.

      Chris


  20. To All,

    I did see one negative comment about the Bulldog’s looks. I wrote a couple weeks ago that the looks are mostly driven by the shape of the shroud.(trapezoidal). However, as I understand it that shape has more than a little to do with minimizing the loudness of the gun. It’s a form follows function thing. Personally I don’t subscribe to that school of thought. But, there it is.

    By the way, I got my Single Action Army today. I talk more about it tomorrow.

    G&G


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