by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • 2000 psi fill
  • First test — Premier 7.9
  • Test 2 — Premier 10.6 Copper Magnum
  • Test 3 — H&N Sniper Magnum
  • Test 4 — RWS Hobby
  • Cocking
  • Trigger pull
  • Overall evaluation

Today we look at the velocity of the new Benjamin Maximus PCP. I know I’m excited!

2000 psi fill

Like the Benjamin Discovery, the Maximus is filled to only 2000 psi, which means is it easier on air in all ways. It’s easier to fill with a hand pump, it takes less air from a scuba tank or other high-pressure air vessel and it allows you to continue to get full fills when your tank is below 3000 psi. Yet it gets the same velocity as other precharged airguns that are filled to 3000 psi and higher. It just makes everything easier for the shooter.

First test — Premier 7.9

First I filled the rifle and tested it for both velocity and shot count. I tested the Benjamin Discovery in January of 2008, and the .177 prototype peaked at 953 f.p.s. with 7.9-grain Crosman Premiers. That was the same pellet I used to start this test.

The first 10 shots averaged 950 f.p.s. They ranged from a low of 935 f.p.s. to a high of 972 f.p.s. So this Maximus is testing out the same as the Discovery, all those years ago. The spread for this first string of 10 shots is 37 f.p.s. That’s a little high, but right in line with all the Discoverys I’ve tested. At the average velocity this pellet generated 15.84 foot-pounds at the muzzle. Here is a look at the shot string.

Shot……………….Velocity (f.p.s.)
1………………………..952
2………………………..972
3………………………..956
4………………………..957
5………………………..954
6………………………..948
7………………………..948
8………………………..942
9………………………..939
10………………………935

As you can see, the velocity starts dropping after the fifth shot. That tells me the next string will be slower, on average

The second 10 pellets on the same fill averaged 904 f.p.s. The spread went from a high of 935 f.p.s. and dropped straight down to a low of 872 f.p.s. This spread is 63 f.p.s. — almost double the first string. Clearly the rifle is running out of breath at the end of 20 shots. But we have learned not to judge anything until we see some results on paper. Here is string number 2.

Shot……………….Velocity (f.p.s.)
11………………………..935
12………………………..926
13………………………..919
14………………………..911
15………………………..909
16………………………..898
17………………………..897
18………………………..891
19………………………..878
20………………………..872

After 20 shots the reservoir pressure had dropped to almost exactly 1000 psi.

I’m going to say the shot count is about 20, unless I learn different in the accuracy test. And I will do more than one of those. The first one will be at 10 meters with open sights to help pick the best pellets. Then I’ll mount a scope and back up to 25 yards. And finally I’ll move out to 50 yards.

All the time I am testing this rifle, we must bear in mind that it was built to a price. We are looking for accuracy that’s okay — not world class!

From this point on, all results will be on a fresh fill to 2000 psi.

Test 2 Premier 10.6 Copper Magnum

This test is with the new 10.6-grain Crosman Premier Copper Magnum pellet. Crosman says on the card that comes with the pellet that these are 20 percent more accurate ay 50 yards than the standard 7.9-grain Crosman pellet. I will be testing that for you, also.

This pellet averaged 882 f.p.s. for 10 shots. The low was 868 f.p.s. and the high was 890 f.p.s., so 22 f.p.s. for the string. At the average velocity this pellet generated 18.31 foot-pounds at the muzzle. Let’s look at that string.

Shot……………….Velocity (f.p.s.)
1………………………..885
2………………………..868
3………………………..885
4………………………..883
5………………………..890
6………………………..887
7………………………..880
8………………………..883
9………………………..881
10………………………879

Test 3 — H&N Sniper Magnum

This test will demonstrate the power of this rifle. Pneumatics and CO2 guns generate the most power with the heaviest pellets — just the reverse of what spring guns do. H&N Sniper Magnums average 757 f.p.s. for 19.09 foot-pounds of energy. The spread went from a low of 743 f.p.s. to a high of 766 f.p.s., a 23 f.p.s spread. The curve was much different, though. Looking at it, I would have to say this rifle likes this pellet.

Shot……………….Velocity (f.p.s.)
1………………………..743
2………………………..748
3………………………..752
4………………………..753
5………………………..758
6………………………..760
7………………………..761
8………………………..766
9………………………..766
10………………………759

Test 4 — RWS Hobby

The final pellet I tested was the RWS Hobby. It is a lead pellet and pretty accurate at distances of 25 yards and less. Of course I could have tested some ultra-light alloy pellets, too, but Hobbys are far more likely to be used in the Maximus.

Hobbys averaged 1023 f.p.s., which is above Crosman’s claim of 1,000 f.p.s. for the Maximus. They ranged from a low of 1016 f.p.s. to a high of 1038 f.p.s, so a spread of 22 f.p.s. At the average velocity, Hobbys generated 16.27 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle. They were also pretty consistent.

Shot……………….Velocity (f.p.s.)
1………………………..1017
2………………………..1016
3………………………..1021
4………………………..1038
5………………………..1026
6………………………..1027
7………………………..1021
8………………………..1028
9………………………..1016
10………………………1017

Cocking

I must remark on the cocking. The Maximus action resembles a 2260 action, because that was what the Discovery sprang from. But cocking these PCPs is much different than cocking a CO2 rifle. The striker spring is much heavier, and you have to get used to it. I had forgotten that in the years since I shot a stock Discovery, but the Maximus broiught it all back.

Trigger pull

The Maximus trigger is not adjustable. It is 2-stage and breaks right at 6 pounds with a fair amount of creep. I know there are things that can be done to reduce this, and if I owned the rifle I would do some of them.

Overall evaluation

Remembering what the Maximus is, I feel the test is progressing well and the rifle is showing its stuff. I can’t wait to see how it does in the accuracy tests!