Sig Sauer Spartan BB pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig Spartan BB pistol
Sig Sauer Spartan BB pistol offers a lot of pistol at a budget price.

Part 1
Part 2 

This report covers:

  • The test
  • H&N Smart Shot
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • The trigger
  • Air Venturi Zinc-Plated BBs
  • Overall evaluation

It’s accuracy day for the the Sig Spartan BB pistol, and I have to tell you I am excited. The trigger on this pistol, while heavy, breaks so crisply that I am expecting good things.

The test

I shot from 5 meters, seated and resting my shooting arm on a UTG Monopod. The Spartan’s sights are fixed but they are wide enough for good accuracy and the front post is sharp. There was no problem seeing the sights on the target for a 6 o’clock hold.

H&N Smart Shot

I tried the H&N Smart Shot lead BBs first. I did that because the Spartan only got 40 good shots on a CO2 cartridge in Part 2 and I wanted the pistol to be as powerful as possible with this heavier BB.

The first BB went high and centered on the bull. Shot number 2 hit right next to it and we were off to a great start. Ten BBs went into 1.636-inches at 5 meters, which is a little larger than I would like. I think it isn’t worth the extra expense to use these lead BBs, unless you are doing it for their extra safety.

09-06-17-01-Sig-Spartan-BB-pistol-Smart-Shot-target Smart Shot target
Ten H&N Smart Shot lead BBs went into 1.636-inches at 5 meters.

Hornady Black Diamond BBs

Next up were some Hornady Black Diamond BBs. Ever since they shocked me in the test of the Gletcher Stechkin pistol, I have vowed to try these in every BB gun. In the Spartan 10 of them went into 1.336-inches at 5 meters. That’s acceptable accuracy for a BB pistol in my book. You can certainly roll tin cans with it.

Sig Spartan BB pistol Air-Venturi Hornady Black Diamond target
Ten Hornady Black Diamond BBs went into 1.336-inches at 5 meters. A BB to consider for this pistol.

The trigger

I have to comment on the Spartan’s trigger. If you shoot rapid-fire you won’t notice anything, beyond the fact that it’s heavy. But for bullseye shooting it is extremely crisp. I wish some of my 1911s were as crisp.

Air Venturi Zinc-Plated BBs

The final BB I shot was the Air Venturi Zinc-Plated BB. I used them to represent all the premium BBs on the market. I didn’t think they would challenge the Black Diamonds. But they did. Ten went into 1.472-inches at 5 meters. While not quite as tight as the Black Diamonds, it’s plenty tight enough for casual plinking.

Sig Spartan BB pistol Air Venturi Steel BB target
Ten Air Venturi Zinc-Plated BBs went into 1.472-inches at 5 meters. Another BB for the Spartan!

Overall Evaluation

Well, I have now tested the Spartan BB pistol thoroughly. I know it’s very similar to the Max Michel 1911 that I tested a year ago, so I purposely did not look at that old test. I wanted to see the Spartan with fresh eyes.

Seeing it that way, I have to say I like this BB pistol. It’s so true to a 1911A1 that it’s easy to imaging it as a firearm. And I do like the special finish the Spartan has. In fact, it took some resistance to not buy a Spartan 1911 firearm, after seeing this one! I do that from time to time, you know.

There are many 1911 BB pistols, so you certainly have a good choice. I think you’ll want to look at the Spartan is the finish resonates with you. It’s acceptably accurate, if a little bit of a gas hog. The blowback is great, the trigger is crisp and the sights are very sharp and clear.

47 thoughts on “Sig Sauer Spartan BB pistol: Part 3

  1. BB et al..
    Another stinker here today, into the 90’s again with the forecast for even warmer over the next few days. No shooting today though, just mundane things like mowing grass on the range, moving a bunch of heavy fencing stuff and by about 4:30 PM I’ d had enough. Time for dinner and a snooze.
    By 8:00PM it had cooled down to about 70° so I decided to go and plink on the 60 yard tin can in the front yard for a while. I bulked the Tau 200S with 30 grams of co2 – enough for 120 reliable shots and set up in the greenhouse at exactly 60 yards from the tin can. Rather than just plink I decided to keep track of all my shots.
    Useing Crosman Hunter 7.4gn pellets and no called flyers on 120 shots I had about 5% flyers that I can honestly say were not my fault. I know how consistantly accurate this gun is especially as I have it scoped and shoot off a bipod.
    I’m sure those flyers are due to defects in the pellets and not just limited to the cheaper ones as I see similar inconsistancies even with expensive pellets. Sometimes I hear them zipping into the grass nowhere close to the target line and on the range knocking up puffs of dirt on the berm behind the target sometimes several feet away.
    I don’t recall pellet quality being this bad in the past and wonder if Quality Control is falling off as it seems to be doing with everything else today. Just a sign of the times!
    Cheers
    Dave


    • Redrafter,

      You lost me on the Tau 200S. On the rest of your comment, a few things struck me. co2, 60 yards and Crosman pellets. You sound as if you have a pretty good baseline for your rifle to consider your results odd. I would always be suspect of power fluctuations with co2. Second, 60 yards is a fair bit for a .177. Third, I would always be suspect of Crosman pellets and any kind of reliable consistency from pellet to pellet.

      Weighing and head sorting would be the only way to eliminate the pellet factor. A few here will run a sampling of a new tin through a Pelletgage. The consensus seems to be that head consistency is more important than weight, although you will see weight vary considerably if you measure out to X.OO grain and even X.O grain.

      As for “flyers” and how you just knew it was the pellets and not you,.. I can relate a bit to that. First, I would have to be shooting very well and into the physical and mental “zone”, so to speak, in order to state that. That would reduce the “me” factor. Second, even scoped and bi-podded is no guarantee.

      The other day, I was into the “zone” and shooting my .25 M-rod at 70 yards using JSB’s. I can safely that I had some flyers that were not me. Why?, I do not know or sure. Few would argue that JSB’s are not a quality pellet. I did not weigh or head sort the ones I was shooting. I rarely do anymore. I could not get proven results showing that it was worth the time and effort,..that I could discern.

      Is there a point here? Sort of. Shoot premium pellets. Be on your game each time you shoot. Tuff. Eliminate all variables as best you can. Chrony, weigh and head sort. Regulator, if that can apply. In the end, I suspect that you will still have those shots that you “just know” that were not you. The million dollar question then becomes,.. “what was it?”. 😉

      Have fun and enjoy. I enjoy your reports and updates of your shooting adventures.

      Good Day to you and to all,… Chris


      • Chris
        The gun is a Tau BRNO 200 Senior from the mid 80’s. I can’t find a photo of it on Google so will attach one that is close. Basically the same gun except the butt is about 1¼” longer. I turned up the MV so it shoots a little hot at 580fps for the longer shots. It has always been an accurate gun with rough 1 hole groups at 10 metres. For these longer shots I use a Leapers 4x Bugbuster scope with the gun on a Harris bipod and I always shoot in the late evening when there is no wind.
        I guess what I was trying to say was that I was surprised at the inconsistentcies running at 5% or better. I guess I’d always known they were there, just not the extent.
        The pellets I’m useing are Crosman Hunters, the ones that come bulk, 1250 in the 250 ml cardboard container and I used to sort them visually and by weight with the same lack of results that you had so I don’t anymore. They’re pretty close to CPL’s, just half the price. Also about the same quality with the same number of flyers.
        I do use premium pellets as well on this and other guns and apart from the selectivity by gun I don’t see a great difference from the cheaper pellets.
        Because of this little test I now have a better understanding of the “what or why was that” factor and just won’t let it bother me anymore.
        Cheers
        Dave


        • Dave,

          I am not saying don’t do it, but as you already know, it is a bit of extra work. The gun looks like it would be comfortable to shoot. I did look up yours in the Blue Book and they are listed, but sadly no photos. It list a plain 200, 200 Junior and a 200 Adult. I do love the peepers. The only one I have is the 499.

          I was just relaying what I have experienced. By all means, feel free to explore all options. I can not speak to pellet quality decline. I am not sure that many could. For one, a person would have to (solid) previous data and then compare that to current data. Premium pellets will increase your odd’s. That I can say with almost certainty.

          Chris


          • Chris
            I should have mentioned the photo is just a stock Google image. I don’t think those peep sights were ever stock. I think the ones that came with my gun are better than those sights. Also the sights and about 10 oz. of barrel weights have been removed to allow the gun to balance better with the scope and bipod. It also has a leather target sling that straps to your upper left arm above the elbow and connects to a quick release attach point that runs in a track from the front of the fore stock to just ahead of the trigger guard. Gives you the ability to really steady the gun shooting from standing position. It is comfortable to shoot but I’ve noticed with the scope that it can be particularly annoying sometimes because my heart beat moves the POA up and down an inch or so and I have to time the trigger pull between beats.
            Cheers
            Dave



  2. Ok just got my your gun has been shipped email so my HW50 will be here soon. So I have been looking at other HW springers and noticed on the HW35 for example that the rear sight is mounted on the rear of the spring tube. The advantage of an increased sight radius is self evident, so why isn’t this mounting location used more often on break barrel guns? I get that a barrel attachment assures alignment with the bore, however the HW35 by my understanding is a target rifle so so it must be a very accurate way to mount a sight.


    • Coduece
      When is soon? Today or a couple days yet?

      And when you get it and unbox it. Don’t throw the little white square tag/envelope away attached to the trigger guard with a string.

      That’s all your front sight inserts.

      But let me know when you get it. Definitely want to hear what you think.


    • Well since I got the notification this morning it could show up tomorrow but probably more like fri. The groups using various holds looks like some very helpful information that I will be able to use. I screen shot it.


  3. Hey B.B.
    This post prompted me to go back and re-read your 2006 post on bb gun accuracy:

    https://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2006/05/can-a-common-bb-gun-be-accurate/

    For a pistol this nice looking, it would be cool if it could at least shoot into an inch at 5 meters.
    As you noted, the Daisy Avanti 499 showed the way
    (I bought one from Pyramydair for my pastor’s son…really cool and accurate gun!),
    so why don’t more manufacturers tighten up their barrels and actions and start making some bb pistols that have the accuracy to go with their looks? Would they become too costly and price themselves out of the market?
    Thanks for listening and keep up the good work!
    take care & God bless,
    dave


  4. What does an accurate pistol look like? Kind of like this =D

    Admittedly, it’s a single shot, but it’s still pretty cool; it started out as a Crosman 1377 from Pyramydair; I also got the steel breech and the adjustable rear sight from them. Then I sent it off to Mountain Air Custom Airguns for the 12″ .22 caliber barrel, rosewood stocks, and the one and a half pound trigger. At ten pumps (450 fps with Crosman 14.3 g pellets) it will punch through the bottom of an aerosol can at 15 yards, but I mostly use it indoors on my 5 meter range to plink at empty .22 shells. It’s a fun gun, and hangs proudly on the wall when not in use. With 6 pumps (to keep the noise down for my wife’s sake) and no pellet, it’s the world’s most expensive fly swatter!


  5. off subject, just read an article with an interview with Herr Florian Schwartz, General Manager of H&N (on hardair magazine). He said something that got me thinking. He was asked the question about special challenges in designing and manufacturing alloy pellets (lead free). He said it’s hard to design a pellet that is lighter than lead to shoot out of a barrel that was made for lead. The alloy pellets are faster, too fast for the common twist rates of air gun barrels. The resulting over-stabilization of the pellet has a negative effect on its accuracy. So, that got me to thinking, the alloy pellets themselves are not the blame for the lack of accuracy. I have blamed the alloy pellets when it’s not their fault per say. In the future, if the green crowd keeps pushing, I could see an end someday to lead pellets. If so, maybe air gun makers will build a barrel for the alloy pellets. Or, maybe a pellet like the smart shot bb’s could be done.


    • Doc
      I believe you just made a very good point about non lead pellets.

      Or maybe even if someone has a air gun that they would like to shoot a heavier pellet. Maybe a faster twist would help in that case.

      I still like the idea of a FX smooth twist barrel but with muzzle ends that screw on with different twist rates. I do believe they tryed something like that just a little while back. But have not heard no more from FX.

      And I do know that the Air Venturi Wing Shot now has different chokes available that screw on the barrel end for shot gun use. Now they just need a couple with rifling in them to shoot a bullet. They say you can shoot a bullet with the choke out as a smooth bore. But the rifled muzzle insert for the bullet might just be the ticket for that gun.


      • GF1,

        Doc mentions “over-stabilization”, which to me would mean less twist rate. Then again, I think a firearm with a higher fps requires a higher twist rate. But yes, it is the first time I have seen the topic of lead free pellets and a higher twist rate (maybe) being required,… due to the higher fps of alloys. Interesting.


  6. I purchased the Sig Sauer 1911 metal blow back with the Pachmayr wrap around grip then noticed this one and the Max Michel that looked better and cost less ? ….. and was a little disappointed. Until I found out mine was an entirely different pistol with a full metal, complete with CO2, drop out mag and according to the P/A comments a ‘More Much Gooder’ version of the Sig 45 .
    This Spartan and the Max did not do to well in P/A’s comments sections suggesting you get what you pay for but you can always luck out once in a while and get a winner.


  7. B.B., I thought you might find this interesting; it’s notes on “accurizing a Red Ryder” from Craig3R (from Charlotte NC):
    Re: Accuracy or accurizing of a Red Ryder?
    « Reply #5 on: April 01, 2016, 11:02:41 PM »
    Ok, this might help your Red Ryder accuracy. I bought an older model 1938 commemorative Red Ryder. It has a medallion in the stock that says 1938. It was in need of paint but it shot strong. It was NOT accurate. Typical shotgun pattern.
    Here is how I solved the accuracy problem: first, since the plastic cap that anchored the front end of the soda-straw barrel was worn out, I bought a new one from Daisy. So here is the fix… Put some crazy glue on the end of the barrel (on the outside of course) then install the new end barrel cap. Wait a few minutes for the glue to dry. Then glue the end cap the metal tube. Yep. I just ruined my RR by permanently glueing the barrel so it does not move.
    The effect on accuracy was astonishing. My Red Ryder can now consistently hit 1/4 inch targets at 16 feet . No kidding! Not everyone will have this success. If you care to try this let us know the results?
    P.S. I added a scope and Bryce mount. It’s really impressive. It almost competes with my 499!
    full post is here:
    https://www.gatewaytoairguns.org/GTA/index.php?topic=106848.0


  8. Ok I think this is kind of interesting. It’s to do with different holds. Used the HW30s. It’s the smoothest spring gun I have to say I have shot. But this definitely shows what the hold does to this gun.

    All the info is on the target. But I think you will agree that trigger hand grip is the trick for this gun. I did the artillery hold, the gun on the bag with no fore hand and my hold.

    And I didn’t get to shoot yesterday and I was ready. Plus it was calm and the wind was blocked from behind me by the house and woods in the front yard.

    But here is my hold and the picture of the target.
    https://youtu.be/ak-5E2phnCw

    https://youtu.be/Z7BCE1339fg


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