The Beeman R7 – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Photos and testing by Earl “Mac” McDonald


The latest Beeman R7 is a handy little rifle.

Today, we’ll look at the power of this new Beeman R7 rifle. Boy, did you guys unload on the design changes made to this new airgun! Those ventings did not fall on deaf ears, either. The senior management at Pyramyd Air read what you said with interest, and I think the next time changes are made we may be consulted for input. This set of changes was made by the old guard at the Beeman company, just before they were sold to Shanghai.

Mac is testing a rifle that came with a 10-for-$10 test chrono ticket, so we have Pyramyd Air’s velocity numbers to start with. They were shot with RWS Hobby pellets and recorded an average velocity of 673 f.p.s. The spread went from 661 to 687, which is 26 f.p.s. The average muzzle energy was 7.04 foot-pounds.

Now, for Mac’s results. You may remember from the R1 test that his chronograph does not agree with the Pyramyd Air chronograph. Don’t let that upset you. It’s the way things work. There will always be some small disagreements and we’ll see more of them today.

JSB Exact 8.4 grain
Let’s begin the test with the JSB Exact 8.4-grain pellet. Mac got an average of 612 f.p.s. with a spread from 600 to 624 f.p.s. That works out to an average muzzle energy of 6.98 foot-pounds. He noticed a lot of dieseling during this test, so he then cleaned the barrel with J-B Non-Embedding Bore Cleaning Compound.

Following the cleaning, he chronographed the JSB pellet again and found it averaged 590 f.p.s. The spread was reduced from 24 f.p.s. to 19 f.p.s. The average muzzle energy was now 6.49 foot-pounds.

RWS Hobbys
Next, he tried RWS Hobby pellets. They averaged 659 f.p.s. with a 17 foot/second spread from 649 to 666 f.p.s. The average muzzle energy was 6.74 foot-pounds. That’s lower than the Pyramyd Air reading, but it’s not as far apart as it was in the R1 test. So, these two chronographs are off by a percentage rather than by a fixed amount. Also, the Pyramyd Air reading was taken on a gun that we know was dieseling. The max velocity spread Pyramyd Air got was 26 f.p.s., while Mac saw only 17 f.p.s. That difference was probably due to the cleaned bore.

Crosman Premier lites
Crosman Premier 7.9-grain pellets averaged 604 f.p.s. with a 26 foot/second velocity spread from 587 to 613 f.p.s. The average muzzle energy was 6.4 foot-pounds.

RWS Superdomes
RWS Superdomes averaged 612 f.p.s. with a 26 foot/second velocity spread from 587 to 613 f.p.s. Yes, they went exactly as fast as the Crosman Premier lites and had the exact same spread. Being heavier, though, they produced an average muzzle energy of 6.9 foot-pounds.

Only because he had it handy did Mac also test his personal R7 with the same RWS Superdomes. His rifle averaged 634 f.p.s. with a 15 foot/second spread from 628 to 644 f.p.s. The muzzle energy averaged 7.41 foot pounds. I think that’s useful to know, for it demonstrates what may well happen to the test rifle after it has a thousand shots run through it. And, remember…I tuned Mac’s rifle many years ago.

Our test of the latest R7 shows that the rifle is still there where it has always been, power-wise. The shorter barrel did not increase the velocity as some people might have predicted.

Next, Mac will test it for accuracy, and we’re hoping for some great results.

80 thoughts on “The Beeman R7 – Part 2

  1. OK, I have a question. I purchased an R7 a little over a year ago. It has the new stock, fifteen and a half inch barrel,silver trigger, open sights and is a tad over thirty eight inches in length. Is this some sort of ” in between” model? The trigger color, open sights and over all length are the things that make me wonder. It has the new stock and barrel but what’s up with the sights, trigger color and the extra inch plus on the length? I hope this is a valid question and I didn’t miss something in the text.


    • Toby,

      You seem to have a transitional model. That happens a lot more than we give credit. And it’s a perfectly valid question to ask.

      A couple years ago I was testing and blogging a rifle that was represented to me as a Turkish-built Webley Patriot. It was even laser-marked with that information. What was never revealed to me, though, was that all the parts were made in Birmingham, England, and shipped to Turkey to be assembled.

      A couple months after my report was published here, the Turks came out with their Godzilla-like version of the Patriot. It was completely different and far cruder. I would never have said all the nice things about it that I did about the misrepresented rifle.

      What I’m saying is, stuff happens.

      B.B.


  2. Good morning B.B.,

    Hope this day is finding you feeling better!

    It’s nice to hear that the senior management at PA is considering some changes in the specs for this gun!

    Bruce



  3. PA is showing Titans in stock, so I guess it is not going to be a Wallyworld exclusive.
    Three glowing reports so far. You won’t find that many good reports on the ‘yellow’ though.
    Or from me either.
    Have to say it is much better since the massive work I put into it, with still more to do with the trigger. After 50 or so junk pellets used to plink with, it runs very consistent low 730’s with Super Domes.
    It’s showing a lot of promise if I can get that nasty trigger cleaned up.

    twotalon



      • Thanks, but I also want to take it apart and polish up the spots that rub together. Want to do that first.
        Had it apart part way to get to a couple springs so I could soften them up. One of them was a real SOB to get back in. It is a lot better now, but is still rough. I did not want to screw with it too much until I got the chamber cleaned up, the seal replaced, and got some kind of idea if it was really going to be worth it to get a replacement trigger. I don’t want to get the replacement unless I can get the other parts running smooth first.
        It does seem to want to shoot a number of different pellets fairly well. MV is very consistent now, the barrel is unexpectedly good and pretty forgiving of different pellets.

        twotalon


  4. Tom came home late Monday afternoon. He had very little pain and no nausea. He had a light dinner and went to sleep.

    This morning, he has very little pain and no nausea. He’s eating breakfast as I write this. Things seem to be going along okay.

    Because he can’t lift more than 5 lbs. for the next 2 weeks, I’ll be doing almost everything for him 🙂

    Edith



    • Morning Edith and Tom,

      I’m delighted that everything seems to be going well – AT LAST – for you and Tom. Actually Ediith, my friend’s father used to say that his doctor would tell him not to lift anything heavier than a lady’s petticoat. Do women still wear those?

      Have a Great Day.

      F – PRoNJ



  5. Hi everyone,

    I’m back at my keyboard and writing as usual. I can’t lift much weight, and that extends to things like cocking breakbarrels, so the blogs will allow for that for the next several weeks.

    The operation went very well and thank you all for your thoughtful wishes. My tummy is sore from the four incisions right now, but that should pass in a week or two. I’m eating regular food again and all bodily functions seem to be back on line.

    B.B.



  6. Hello BB:
    Glad things went well mate 🙂
    When I broke my hand recently the doc advised me not to lift anything heavy.
    I said,
    “Well how do you expect me to take a leak?” lol
    Only kidding 🙂
    Good news indeed.
    DaveUK




    • Doctors could have a field day collecting all of the things people say to them. One guy who did colonoscopies wrote down some memorable things that patients said during the procedure when they were semi-sedated. They included:

      “Did you find the trapper miners?”

      “Hey doc, tell my wife my head is not up there.”

      Matt61


      • Matt,

        You have no idea!

        During my very first surgery back in March I didn’t wake up well, so they had to do some emergency stuff to keep me going, including shoving a breathing tube down my throat. They also collapsed my right lung when they installed a central line IV tube, so that meant they had to put a suction device into my chest. So they kept me sedated for six days while this was going on.

        The first time I came to I found myself on the floor of a room staring at the ceiling. Suddenly a green laser wrote two symbols on the ceiling. One was an X and the other was an alien symbol with three vertical lines. A Voice from nowhere asked, “Which is colder?” I didn’t understand the question, so I panicked and stood up, throwing a female nurse across the room. Then I was tackled by a male nurse and sedated further.

        The next time I woke up another disembodied Voice asked me if I knew where I was. Well, of course I did. I had been captured by French-Canadian terrorists and taken to an empty office in a skyscraper in downtown Edmonton, Canada. I couldn’t tell them that I knew who they were, of course, but I told them I was in Edmonton.

        “No, you’re in Texas.”

        Well, I thought, I must be in downtown Dallas to be 40 stories up in a skyscraper. I was really on the second floor of the hospital.

        Then there was the affair of the two gypsies who washed me with their hair while doing a gyrating dance. I think I told you about that one.

        Several days later I started “reading” the acoustical tiles in the ceilings of the room. They were ads for incredibly cheap tools that someone was trying to sell. That same day I started seeing millions of bugs floating down the walls of my room.

        I’m telling you, a little too much anesthesia is like a quick trip back to the ’60s!

        Oh, and by the way, when I thought I was throwing the female nurse across the room, I was really just writhing around in my bed. Edith was holding my legs down because I was trying to kick the nurses.

        I once asked Edith what time it was and she told me 12 o’clock. “Daytime or night?” I asked, with the sun beating down on me through my window.

        Yes, bring on the anesthesia!

        B.B., the psychedelic putz


        • French-Canadians terrorists… Well that must have been ME !
          Where we armed with 2289’s ? We probably wanted to bring all the sweet airguns you guys have in the US along with the same airgun laws so we kidnapped the greatest know airgun figure, YOU ! But ending up in Edmonton I suspect CowboyStarDad had something to do with this. Nothing to worry about, we would have feed you with poutine (french fries with cheese and gravy) and good Canadian beer eh 😉 we would have released you in better shape (read rounder) then when we got you.

          J-F


          • J-F,
            Have you always lived in Canada (Quebec)? Do you know of Calixa Lavallee? He composed the music for “O Canada”, he his my great, great, etc. grandfather on my mother’s side. I have a lot of the family history but still try to work on it at times.


            • Yes born and raised here and although the winters are quite something I would leave and of course I know Calixa Lavallee (well not personally has he would need to be quite old). There are lots of schools and libraries and stuff like that in his honor.


              • Let me know if you ever come across the stamp with his portrait. My parents used to go to Canada frequently, but since 9/11 and all the restrictions changed they don’t go as often. They both have special licenses to travel back and forth but say it is still quite a hassle at the border even though they live 5 miles from it. My sister works at a bank 1 mile this side the border, says people are always complaining about exchange rates.

                rikib



          • Are we telling hospital stories? Several years ago, my company played another company that we did business with a game of soccer. Long story short – I tore my Achilles tendon. Workman’s comp claim! When the Doc and the gas passer were going to start, I told the gas passer (anesthesiologist) to give me a local and if that wasn’t acceptable, a regional (anesthetize the lower part or upper part of the body) and not to put me out. When he asked why, I told him my cousins were all doctors, one being a gas passer and they told me the trick was not putting the patient to sleep, but waking him up!

            Well, the first shot in the spine failed to do anything, my surgeon got tired of waiting and told the gas passer to hit me again. This was 9 or 10 in the morning. By 10 that night, I still ha not feeling below the waist. The out patient nurses were pissed, my wife was pissed and I couldn’t but at least I wasn’t hallucinating . 🙂

            F PRoNJ


          • J-F,
            I have a daughter living in Gatineau,Quebec. Last time she was home(Ohio) she brought two cans of poutine sauce with her, she said it was heart attack in a can 🙂 . The dark side of French cuisine , Julia Childs never mentioned.



    • Mike,

      According to the Beeman shop manual for the FWB 124 and 127, you turn the trigger adjustment screw (that’s the screw in the front of the trigger blade) to the left, or counter-clockwise, to lessen the sear engagement in stage two of the trigger pull. If you turn the screw too far you will over-adjust the trigger to the point of eliminating stage two and the trigger will break without warning while you are pulling it through stage one..

      So turn the trigger to the right to make the sear engagement greater. The manual advises that the pull should be about 2-3 lbs.

      B.B.


  7. BB,
    Oh, man! So glad to hear your good recovery news. It just keeps getting better and better.

    On this blog article you say it is part two but there is no link to part one. Is that intentional?
    -CJr


  8. Okay, the boys (now 7 & 9) are already thinking Christmas and have started laying down the hints.
    They both want the Umarex HK MP5 b.b. guns. They seem to get good reviews on Pyramyd’s site, but I was wondering if anyone here has personal experience with them.
    As well I signed up the oldest boy for an archery course this winter. Does anyone have any suggestions for a good starter bow for a 9 years old who weighs 100 lbs and is pretty dang strong?
    Over the summer we bought him a bow from Cabela’s for about $50 that was recommended by the clerk. When I mentioned it to the instructer this past Saturday he just shook his head and said it probably won’t do…sounds like it’s the Marksman 1010 of the bow world.
    Any input would be apreciated.
    Man, I’m glad I didn’t have girls…I can’t imagine hanging around the ‘My Little Ponies” forums 😉


    • CowBoyStar Dad,

      As luck would have it, I just ordered the H&K MP5K BB gun for B.B. to test for the blog. Since he has to stay away from heavy items for 2 weeks, I’ve ordered quite a few lightweight CO2 guns for him to shoot. Hopefully, he’ll get around to testing it over the next week or so.

      Edith


    • CowBoyStar Dad, Bear archery is a good brand. I got a very good bow at a reasonable price with a 30 pound draw that I think might be suitable for your boy although it’s been awhile since I was that size and weight. At that age, they shoot up, so he could probably grow into the bow very quickly if he has too. In any case, I would call up Bear archery and consult with them. Judging by their products, they are a quality operation.

      Matt61


    • CSD: I have two boys who are 9 and 6 years old and they have been using a Little Bear Recurve that has a 20 lb pull wt.( AMO 48″, 20# at 24″”). I think Crosman and a couple others have new ones that are similar. You could also look for used quality makes like Martin or Wing bows. I paid only a dollar for a Wing 35# recurve at a garage sale a couple years ago. They are very well made bows. A lot of bows show up for sale at this time of year at flea markets also. If you are looking for at a compund bow I can’t be of much help. We are into mostly traditional archery tackle. I had one briefly which I gave away. It was a Bear and took about 40 # pull to start but then you could hold it forever. Regards ,Robert.


      • CSD : I buy archery tackle from Kustom King traditional archery . They have a 29# pull Robin Hood bow and the Bear Cub 20# &30# recurves for kids, the Bear is a bit expensive but they are very nice bows. They also have a lot of good books on archery.



  9. Edith,
    As a left hander I have a small suggestion. When you write up the specs for an air rifle on PA’s web site or have to change them for some other reason, could you specify in the “Body:” item if it is right hand only? i.e.:

    Body: Rifle, RH only
    Body: Rifle, RH and LH available
    Body: Rifle, Ambidextrous

    Some rifles, like the Bronco, it’s obvious that it is ambi because there is a pic of both sides of the stock but others, like the Beeman RX-2, it’s hard to tell. If I see a cheek piece in the pic I can’t tell if there’s one on the other side. Or do I need training to recognize a RH only stock from the pic?

    I’m not suggesting you go back and change a thousand specs but when you write up new ones is it possible to add that info somehow?

    -CJr


    • CJr,

      We never write right-hand only unless the gun is available in other configurations. If it’s ambi, we say so. Sometimes (and this will be so hard for you to believe, but it’s true), we don’t know what it looks like on the other side! If a gun isn’t in stock or the delivery date is way out in the future, we don’t know if it’s got a raised cheekpiece on one side or both sides…or at all. There have been times that I’ve written up the gun’s description, it arrived 3 months later and it looked completely different than the image the mfr supplied earlier.

      Mfrs. don’t tell us when they change product. It’s impossible to check every box that hits the loading dock.

      Edith


  10. B.B. great news about the operation. Sounds like you’ll need to be waited on hand and foot for awhile. 🙂 One could get used to that.

    Kevin, who is Kevin Kline in A Fish Called Wanda? Is he the crazy renegade from the CIA? Any memorable Nietzsche quotes? Nietzsche is known for his extreme clarity and trenchant sayings which are not typical of philosophers. But I tried reading one of his shorter books called, Thus Spake Zarathustra, and it was like raving nonsense. I’d rather read about carburetors. My main impression of A Fish Called Wanda was all the swearing and “adult situations.” They didn’t bother me, but to my surprise they also didn’t bother some older relatives who had been the souls of propriety and strictness while growing up. They laughed like mad. They also highly recommended a film called Something About Mary which is supposed to be the same kind of thing.

    Matt61


    • Matt,
      I would suggest “Beyond Good and Evil” or “Genealogy of Morals” first. If I remember correctly the “eternal return” features prominently in Zarathustra…may well be complete gibberish, for all I can make out. What you have to keep in mind about his aphoristic style is that it is in large part a revolt against the byzantine system of (systems of) philosophy that was current. Kierkegaard was the earliest I can think of offhand to reject the systems and their methodologies explicitly, and you haven’t read strange (but thoughtful) material unless you’ve read him (I would suggest “Fear and Trembling” or “The Sickness unto Death”). Not exactly what you would expect if your philosophical reading stops with the “Critique of Pure Reason” or thereabouts. Anyway, Nietsche is an important thinker, and should be at least as entertaining as carburetors, if not more so. Given his often nihilistic tendencies, however, I find it odd when he is employed for inspirational quotes:).


      • That explanation makes sense about his aphoristic style, but if he was trying to counteract byzantine language, I’d say his cure is worse than the disease.

        I do remember reading, Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason under duress. In a section on the “Sublime of Power” or something like that as I was trying to stay awake, I came across a passage that got my attention. One of the examples of this concept was the sight of a large strong man. Kant says that anyone’s first natural thought is of how much physical damage he can do to you. Hey, I can relate to that. And it’s nothing that a concealed carry license couldn’t help you with.

        Matt61


        • The style of Also Sprach Zarathustra is different from his other works, more than a little dramatic; that’s why I recommended one of the others to start. I no longer remember (if I ever knew) why he chose to depict himself as Zarathustra, unless there had been some significant advance regarding the Avestan texts in the west at the time he was writing. Perhaps it just added a level of abstraction for his readers and some safety for himself. The book also inspired music, which was later used in a famous sci-fi movie (I know BB knows the answer:)).





  11. Something extraordinary has happened. I finally deleted the Marlin Cowboy from my backorder after it became obvious that the rolling postponements might continue forever. As soon as only in-stock items remained in my order, I closed it. As anticipated, the order got sidelined to “on hold” status because the credit card originally used in January had expired, however no provision existed to update it. I then received an email to call in and update. However, before I found the time to do so, I got another email that my items had shipped, for free! A discount for the full cost of the merchandise and shipping was applied. This is a gesture that goes above and beyond great customer service and vindicates PA as a fine company to do business with.

    Just as I was not shy about complaining before, I now hasten to say that I am touched and grateful for this outstanding gesture. THANK YOU PYRAMYD AIR!

    -AlanL



    • Kevin,

      Yes, I guess I’ll do Part 4 all right. But Edith will have to move the guns for the photography.

      I’ve already forgotten once and lifted the wooden case for the 124, so I need to be careful. I don’t like limitations!

      B.B.


      • Careful there cowboy. You’re as bad a patient as I am and follow directions just as well. You know better than I do that your body is in healing mode and has a lot of sites to mend. Give yourself some extra time. Think about that lovely wife when you get frustrated about the length of the process. It will be worth it in the end. You’ll both be stronger if you get stronger. This is minor. The worst is behind you. You will be healed.

        kevin


        • Kevin,
          Very well put! Tom, listen to your Doc’s wish I had. Take it easy we are all here for you, waiting for your return.
          Most important is that you are fully recovered and don’t push it coming back too fast.

          Take care Tom & Edith

          rikib


  12. Get well and stay well, B.B.! I’ve seen your name around for years but just started digging into your great writing.

    I just got a Sheridan Blue Streak, C9 from “ray-sine” Wisconsin, for $50 at a garage sale last weekend. Got some of those big ol’ clunky Benjamin pellets for it. I’ve wanted one since I was a kid, dunno why, the Olympic guns I’ve shot put everything else in the dark (and work good on vermin) but this thing is a classic.

    You are a gun nut after my own heart, get well.



      • I’m honored by your reply, Sir!

        Nope, been a gun nut from about age 10, first heard of Flobert guns from old NRA mags or Gun Digest or Stoegers, I thing the Flobert is a neat idea, and just chose the name for here.

        Flobert-ish-wise,

        I’ve experimented with:

        Taking a .22 cartridge apart (which is hard to do without mangling it) and putting a .22 pellet into the chamber of my Ruger pistol then the cartridge with primer only, and firing it, it’s quiet, decent velocity, and if they weren’t so dang hard to take apart, I’d seriously see how that load groups, and use my Ruger this way for varmints around here. This load would be sweet in say an S&W 17/617, load each chamber up and pip! pip! they go.

        Taking a .22 pellet and propelling it with one of those .22 blanks used in nail guns, nope it’s too spicy even using Grey, the weakest load.

        I want to come up with a tool to put a hollowpoint hole into CB Shorts/Longs to make ’em into a decent little pest killer, as they are, well, round-nose bullets are just a loser. I’d tell you exactly how I know but then PETA would have to kill me. I’d love to have several times my bodyweight in CBs, put through the “hollow’inator” treatment they’d be the most excellent pest rounds evar.

        Yeah. I like guns.



        • Flobert,

          You may encounter accuracy problems with a .22 pellet in a rimfire barrel. The pellet barrel spec is 0.218″ across the grooves, while the rimfire is 0.223″ or 0.2235″ across. That’s a big difference. The skirt will blow out to seal the bore but the head will flop to one side, I think.

          B.B.


          • Interesting! I guess accuracy may suffer, if not worse things.

            Good point, Other Poster, about not mentioning other organizations. Thanks.

            I took my Sheridan to the dizzying height of 5 pumps, and shot a few shots out the window at an cat food can (steel can) set end toward me, 4 pumps just short of passed through, the last shot at 5 pumps, went through – the same hole! In a late-afternoon light angle I can see the pellet fly. But it does stuff when it gets there.

            Right now I prefer my springer for ease of use but my springer’s only good for 450-500 fps in .177 I think. I may feel differently about a much more powerful springer.

            The Sheridan is sure showing itself to be accurate.

            I am slowly moving up to more pumps, just as one should do with a Sheridan/Benjamin that may have been in storage for years, and I’m storing it with 1 pump when not shooting it.


  13. BB & Edith,
    good to hear you have exited the tunnel. Now get back up to strength,remember pain is natures way of telling you to take it easy 🙂 . Neither being taken care of or taking care of someone is easy I’ve been on both sides, but it is only temporary. Best of luck and health.


Leave a Reply