Handguns — one hand or two?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • It depends
  • One hand for me!
  • One hand target hold
  • Limp wrist
  • Why ever hold with just one hand?
  • Why use two hands?
  • What I’m not discussing
  • Last word

I’m writing this report for all the newer readers we have been getting over the past few months. I see a lot of discussion about handguns and many people are having problems with the hold. What’s right — one hand or two?

It depends

Like most things, this issue has no single correct answer. It’s a situational question. What you are doing dictates how you should hold your handgun.

One hand for me!

I started out only holding handguns in one hand. I was in my 50s before I ever tried holding with two — I was that rigid! My teachers were men like Elmer Keith who held handguns in what was considered a classic fashion at the time. It wasn’t until the 1970s that I saw a person hold a handgun with two hands, and when I did I was shocked. Then I learned that law enforcement was teaching this hold and that people were doing so much better with it than with a one-hand hold.

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The BB gage: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BB Gage
The new BB Gage looks like a Pelletgage, and operates in a similar way. Photo provided by Pelletgage.com.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Start with the best
  • The test
  • 4.42mm
  • 4.43mm
  • 4.44mm
  • Results so far
  • Mixed BBs
  • Conclusions

I know there is a lot of interest in today’s subject, because readers have been talking about it since the first part was published. Today we are going to conduct the first test to see if gaging BBs makes any difference in their accuracy.

Start with the best

Naturally I chose the most accurate BB gun for today’s test. The Daisy Avanti 449 BB gun has no equal, as far as accuracy goes. Several readers are talking about the velocity of the 499 and how to increase it. Mine launches BBs at around 250 f.p.s., and that velocity is perfect for what the gun does. I would not tear into a gun that is shooting as accurately as this one does.

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Dan Wesson pellet revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson pellet revolver
New Dan Wesson pellet revolver.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • The shells
  • Safety
  • CO2 piercing screw wrench
  • Velocity
  • RWS Hobby
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Qiang Yuan Training
  • Shot count
  • Trigger

You have waited almost a full month for today’s report. The Dan Wesson pellet revolver I was testing failed and I had to wait for a replacement. Things like that happen to me, just as they do to you, so I wouldn’t be too alarmed. We will resume the test where we stopped, so today we look at the gun’s velocity.

The shells

As a reminder, this revolver has shells that accept the pellets in their bases. The pellets enter a short synthetic insert located in the base of the cartridges and when the gun fires they are blown through the insert, then they move through the body of the shell and leave the cylinder to enter the barrel breech.

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Melvin Johnson’s Indoor Target catapult gun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Johnson Indoor Target Gun
Johnson Indoor Target Gun was an impractical post-war BB gun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Sometimes you just can’t win!
  • Johnson gets shafted
  • The first time
  • After the war
  • Enter the Johnson Indoor Target Gun
  • Repeater
  • It uses surgical tubing
  • Weird cocking!
  • How much power?
  • The cost
  • Do you want one?

Sometimes you just can’t win!

Melvin Johnson was a gun designer of note who left a lasting impression on the world of firearms. Today’s M16/AR15 and all of its variants owe their existence to his marketing attempts with the United States Army. He did not design the gun — that credit belongs to Eugene Stoner. Johnson was the man who convinced the Army that a .22 caliber bullet flying at high velocity was better than a .30 caliber bullet in many ways. It was smaller, lighter, cheaper to make, flew faster and, under certain circumstances, was just as lethal as the larger projectile.

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Resurrecting a classic airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Your new air cane
  • Oh-oh!
  • But I saw this on TV
  • Back to reality
  • What can break on a vintage air cane?
  • Dialing it back
  • Does this really work?

Merry Christmas! I hope this day finds you smiling and joyful.

Today I want to discuss a topic that seldom arises, yet is at the forefront of every novice collector’s mind. Namely, “Should I (and can I) shoot my antique airgun?” Many of you will agree there is no one right answer to this question, because the answer depends on many things. Today I’d like to discuss a few of them.

Your new air cane

Let’s say you went to an airgun show and were captivated by a beautiful air cane that was still in its original case with all the accoutrements. When you saw it for the first time your heart melted and your wallet popped open with unaccustomed speed. You wanted this air cane!

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What airgun do you want for Christmas?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB P44
FWB P44 is a world-class 10 meter target air pistol.

This report covers:

  • My pick
  • Over to you

Today is all about you readers. You get to write about the airguns you would like to see under the Christmas tree, or just get — period. There are no limits, so let your imaginations run wild and free.

My pick

I would like to get an FWB P44 target pistol. I have coveted FWB PCP target pistols since the P30 first came on the market nearly 20 years ago. They always feel just right in my hand and effortless to operate. And starting with the the P34, they have been 100 percent recoilless. Even the slight movement of the striker is cancelled by the firing mechanism, leaving you with just the sound of the shot as evidence the gun has discharged. Unless you experience it, it’s difficult to imagine.

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The best of B.B.: Can nitrogen be used in PCPs?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The argument
  • Liability
  • So, is nitrogen dangerous?
  • Oxygen can kill you!
  • So what? We’re talking about nitrogen
  • What about other gasses?
  • Show some respect

Tomorrow is Thursday, December 24. It’s Christmas Eve. On that day I’m running a special blog that allows you readers to do most of the writing. We will all tell which airgun we would like to receive for Christmas, and I will start it in the text. Be thinking about the one airgun you want the most this year.

I realize that not all readers celebrate the Christmas holiday. But don’t let that deter you from commenting. Whether you celebrate Christmas or not, this exercise is open to all readers.

I’m running some Best of B.B. reports to give myself some time at Christmas. I have family and guests this week, and I can’t get to the computer as often as I would like. This report was first published back on January 15, 2008. I have updated and added a few things to it for today.

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