Crosman 102 multi-pump pneumatic repeater: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 102
Crosman’s 102 is a .22 caliber multi-pump repeater.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • More than one shot per fill?
  • How many pumps?
  • The test
  • Sights
  • Pellet feed
  • RWS Meisterkugeln
  • Crosman wadcutters
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Now 10 shots
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Crosman 102 repeating multi-pump pellet rifle. The last time I shot this rifle was back before the SHOT Show in January. I kept putting it off for no reason that I can remember.

More than one shot per fill?

Since it is a repeater, does it get more than one shot per fill? It’s not supposed to. There are multi-pumps that do get more than one shot per fill and I will be covering one of them for you — a rare Benjamin 700. But that’s not today. The 102 has to be pumped for every shot.

How many pumps?

If you take the time to read Part 2 you will see that I discovered that this rifle doesn’t need more than 5 pump strokes to achieve its best velocity. I tested it to 8 strokes, but after 5 strokes the velocity increase got really small. read more


Daisy Model 99 Target Special: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

Daisy 99
Daisy Model 99 Target Special.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • What is accuracy in a BB gun?
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Dust Devils
  • Daisy BBs
  • Daisy Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Discussion
  • 499
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Daisy 99 Target Special BB gun. Up to this point I have told you the history of the gun and we have looked at its velocity. Daisy purposely made this BB gun as a target gun. That means target sights and a sling. It also means a good trigger. But what about the barrel? Unless they did something with that you aren’t going to see any more accuracy from this gun than you would from a Red Ryder. I owned a 99 many years ago but it’s been so long that I can’t remember what it was like. I’m learning about this gun right alongside you. read more


FWB 110 target rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

FWB 110
FWB 110 target rifle.

This report covers:

  • Sliding compression chamber
  • Velocity
  • RWS Hobby
  • Vogel Match Green
  • Accuracy
  • How good is it?
  • Summary

Today I will finish the report on the FWB 110 target rifle. Some readers thought I was testing the rifle myself. Jerry and Tommy Cupples offered to leave it with me, but given its rarity and value, I declined. I would hate for anything to happen to it in shipping! So, they did the testing for me. Let’s take a look.

Sliding compression chamber

When you pull the sidelever back you also pull the sliding compression chamber back, which in turn moves the piston. The piston compresses the mainspring, and when the sear catches the piston, the rifle is cocked. I showed you the compression chamber open in Part 1, so link back to that (above) if you have forgotten. read more


Daisy Model 99 Target Special: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1

Daisy 99
Daisy Model 99 Target Special.

This report covers:

  • Leather seals
  • Back to the 99
  • Velocity Daisy BBs
  • Velocity Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Velocity Air Venturi Dust Devils
  • More on the Dust Devil
  • Other BBs
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation so far
  • Coming up

Today is velocity day for the Daisy Model 99 Target Special and I have prepared for it. When I started Part 1, I oiled the gun with a healthy dose of Crosman Pellgunoil. The synthetic piston seal on the plunger (in a BB gun the piston is called a plunger) needs the oil to seal the compression chamber. Lack of oil in a BB gun will cause temporary low power until the seal is oiled. Then the gun will return to life and act like new. It happens so fast and dramatically that it will surprise you the first time you encounter it.

Leather seals

Older BB guns had leather plunger seals that take longer to renew — maybe 15-20 shots. But they do come back in the same way after oiling. The oil needs time to soak into the seal. The most dramatic example of this I ever saw was an 1880s BB pistol that my wife Edith bought at a flea market in the late 1990s. After a breech plug was fashioned for it the gun shot like it did when new, only the spring and leather seal were at least 110 years old. If that isn’t surprising I don’t know what is! read more


FWB 110 target rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

FWB 110
FWB 110 target rifle. I’m the one who cut off both ends of the gun in this photo.

This report covers:

  • FWB target rifles
  • First target rifle
  • How rare and what is it worth?
  • What’s it like?
  • Sliding compression chamber
  • Same as a 300
  • Trigger
  • What does it feel like?
  • Summary

I was going to run the Daisy 99 today, but this opportunity to review the FWB 110 came along and things were just right for it. How about I do Part 2 of the Daisy 99 on Monday?

Most of today’s pictures were provided by Tommy Cupples. My thanks to him for their use.

FWB target rifles

After World War II the world of airguns got a jump start from the reorganization of economies worldwide. In many countries there was disposable cash to spend and airguns vied for a share of it. In Germany the production of fine target air rifles like the Weihrauch HW55 and the Walther LG50-series brought formal airgun competition to the forefront. By the 1960s, things had heated up in both the competition realm as well as in the innovation and production of the guns. There were national titles to be won, and, before long, a world cup! read more


Daisy Model 99 Target Special: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Daisy 99
Daisy Model 99 Target Special.

This report covers:

  • Not what I expected
  • Peep sight
  • Front sight
  • Sling
  • Action
  • Stock and forearm
  • Gravity-feed magazine
  • Forced-feed magazine
  • Three variations of the Model 99
  • 99 accuracy
  • Daisy 299
  • Comparison to the 499
  • Summary

Welcome to July! Today I thought I would start looking at the Daisy Model 99 Target Special that I acquired at the recent Texas airgun show. I know reader RidgeRunner is anticipating this report and perhaps others are, as well.

For the readers who are awaiting the next Diana model 23 rifle report, know that I am working on it in the background and hope to have something for you very soon.

And I learned something very important this weekend. Daisy also sold lead shot for the Targeteer. It was obviously number 6 birdshot, and it makes perfect sense, because it would have been far cheaper than heading steel wire to make steel shot. Just buy the shot and repackage it. We know it works, and it probably works better than the steel shot. The tubes of shot I bought from Ebay were all lead shot. I felt cheated until I did the research and discovered lead was also correct. The learning never ends. Now let’s look at the Daisy 99 Target Special. read more


Daisy Targeteer shooting gallery: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

Targeteer shooting gallery
Daisy Targeteer shooting gallery.

This report covers:

  • Velocity
  • Ebay comes through!li>
  • Target
  • The test
  • First 10 shots
  • What about Daisy steel shot?
  • Bottom line

Today is accuracy day for the old Daisy Targeteer I’m testing. In Part two I showed you how I solved the feeding problem and got my pistol back to operational condition, though “operational” is a stretch. It’s weak and there is nothing that can be done about it. Today I will show you how I made a target to test the accuracy of the Targeteer.

Velocity

This is just a reminder of what we are dealing with. I have to shoot either original Daisy steel BBs, which are collectable in their own right, or number 6 birdshot. The birdshot is easy enough to get, but it has to be sorted by dropping it through the shot tube. If you don’t you’ll get one stuck and have to deal with it. The Daisy BBs go about 120 f.p.s. and the birdshot goes about 105 f.p.s., so neither one is powerful enough to go through a paper target. I will address that in a moment, but first let me tell you what I did about the shot. read more