Daisy’s 179 BB pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The Spittin’ Image
  • What is it?
  • Catapult gun
  • A kinetic gun?
  • Very low power
  • Cowboys are cool
  • Four variations
  • The Holy Grail
  • The pistol
  • That’s all for today

The Spittin’ Image

In 1960, Daisy Manufacturing Company embarked on a marketing campaign that was to blossom into one of the largest segments of the airgun market. They brought out their model 179 BB pistol that was copied after the Colt Single Action Army revolver. A few years later they brought out their first 1894 that was highly successful, and a half-century after that not many people remember the first Spittin’ Image BB gun.

Daisy 179
Daisy’s 179 BB pistol came out in 1960 — the first of the Spittin’ Image guns.

Today the lookalike airgun market is huge. It’s expanding all the time, with more and more realistic models coming out every day. You can argue that the 179 was not even the first such airgun Daisy made. many folks think their Targetmaster BB pistol copies the Colt Woodsman Match Target and the Number 25 slide action BB gun was patterned after the Winchester model 12 shotgun. But in 1960 the term Spittin’ Image was first used to describe this pistol as an intentional lookalike.

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Dan Wesson M512 4-inch pellet revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson pellet revolver
New 4-inch Dan Wesson pellet revolver from ASG is very realistic!

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in reveals a problem
  • First group of Hobbys
  • Qiang Yuan pellets
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Crosman Premier lite pellets
  • Evaluation

Today we look at the accuracy of the Dan Wesson 4-inch pellet revolver. As we do it may be helpful for you to keep in mind the fact that I have also tested both the 8-inch Dan Wesson pellet revolver and the 6-inch Dan Wesson pellet revolver, so you have something to compare today’s test to. To see those tests, go to the product listing I linked to and look for the link to the review/article. Let’s get to it.

The test

I shot from 10 meters, resting my hands on a sandbag. I’m shooting just 6 shots at each bull, because that is how many cartridges the gun holds. I sighted-in and also shot the first group with 7-grain RWS Hobby pellets. All shooting was done in the single-action mode (where I manually cock the hammer before each shot). There were no bad shots in this test. Everything you are about to see happened with the sights in perfect alignment.

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Dan Wesson M512 4-inch pellet revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson pellet revolver
New 4-inch Dan Wesson pellet revolver from ASG is very realistic!

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Loading the CO2
  • Loading the cartridges
  • The tests
  • RWS Basic
  • Crosman Premier lite
  • Qiang Yuan training pellets
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Analysis
  • 2017 Pyramyd Air Cup
  • 2017 Texas Airgun Show

Today I test the velocity of the Dan Wesson 4-inch pellet revolver. This should be an interesting test.

Loading the CO2

I installed a fresh CO2 cartridge in the grip, after putting a couple drops of Crosman Pellgunoil on the tip of the cartridge before piercing. The oil gets blown into the valve and coats every seal inside, ensuring the gun remains gas-tight.

Loading the cartridges

The cartridges load from the rear, which is easy to do. The pellets slip into the plastic liners of each cartridge easily and stay there securely until the gas blows they into the barrel.
The loaded cartridges also load easily into the cylinder. When you’re done shooting, all you have to do is open the cylinder and tip the muzzle up and the cartridges fall right out. There is no expansion from gas the way there is with a firearm cartridge.

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Is it okay to pay more?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Dan Wesson
  • Guns as investments
  • FWB 124
  • Condition matters
  • It’s worth what someone will pay
  • Guns as safe investments
  • Non-pristine, yet solid investments
  • Sheridan Supergrade
  • BSA Airsporter Mark I
  • Bottom line

Of all the reports I have written, this one might just get me in trouble with some of you readers. I’m going to talk about money today. Politics and religion are two topics that are guaranteed to start a conversation, but when the topic is money the talk gets very personal for some people. What I am about to say may hit people the wrong way. But it is what I believe and I am going to defend my position.

Dan Wesson

When I researched material for the first report on the Dan Wesson 4-inch pellet revolver last week, I happened to look up Dan Wesson pistol pacs on the Gun Broker website. There was a very complete one that was selling for around $1,585, the time I first saw it. I checked the expired auctions and discovered that pristine examples had brought over $2,100 in the recent past, so this one seemed undervalued. Of course the auction was still live, so it could still go up.

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Dan Wesson M715 4-inch pellet revolver: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson pellet revolver
New 4-inch Dan Wesson pellet revolver from ASG is very realistic!

This report covers:

  • Before we begin
  • Begin
  • Heavy
  • Very realistic!
  • Finish
  • Sights
  • Action
  • Why no pistol pacs?
  • Performance
  • Evaluation
  • Texas Airgun Show

Before we begin

Just a word about the reports. A lot of them are backed up right now. The SHOT Show, the weather and then my eye operation tomorrow have combined to set me back on the schedule. I promise to attend to them when I can, but my sight has degraded to the point that it is challenging to just do all that I have to do. Shooting for accuracy takes me much longer than it ever did, and the weather hasn’t cooperated that much. But I have plans for this, and hopefully they will bear fruit.

Begin

One nice thing about the SHOT Show is it sometimes gives us immediate looks at new airguns. Today is such a time.

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Firearm pellet adaptor: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Must load from the front of the cartridge
  • Sizing pellets to fit into the mouth of the case
  • How deep is the pellet seated?
  • A lot of “stuff” to support the adaptor
  • The stuff
  • The test
  • Benchrest
  • Surprise!
  • Shot 4
  • Discussion

Today we look at the accuracy of the firearm pellet adaptor. This is what we have been interested in all along. In Part 2 we saw that the velocity was stable when the pellets were loaded deep inside the neck of the adaptor, but not when they sat proud. That generated several questions that I will address before I get to the test. Everything I do today was done with the .22-caliber JSB Exact Jumbo pellet.

Must load from the front of the cartridge

Several readers wondered what might happen if the pellet was pushed in from the rear of the cartridge, rather than loaded from the front. The dents at the base of the cartridge case shoulders prevent that from happening, though I expect you could push a pellet through if you used a lot of force.

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They have the wrong twist rate!: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Then came big bores
  • What am I talking about?
  • Bullets don’t work like pellets
  • Bullet length
  • Why bullet diameters matter
  • Hard cast lead bullets
  • Putting all of this together
  • Last story

Before we begin I have some startling news from Umarex USA. Sales manager, Justin Biddle contacted me and told me the new Hammer big bore is regulated.! I certainly did not know that, because this is huge news. It means that those three shots it gets on a fill can all be at the same power level. I have adjusted the SHOT Show report (Part 6) to reflect this new information. And by a strange coincidence, this dovetails nicely with today’s report.

For many years I have written about black powder firearms in this blog, and I have included things like rifling twist rates in those articles. And for years people have written me comments that they appreciate a look at something different, but they would never consider shooting black powder arms or even modern firearms, themselves.

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