Boxes — keep ’em?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Love my job
  • Boxes everywhere
  • Good or bad?
  • Time adds value
  • Designing a box
  • Keep or not?

Love my job

I may have mentioned this before — I love my job! I get to handle and shoot airguns every day of my life, and I get to tell others about it. What’s not to like? Well, there may be one thing. Boxes.

My house is taken over by boxes. There isn’t a room in the house that doesn’t have at least one gun and one gun box. What’s that? You think my bathrooms are free? Think again. I bet I have the only guest bathroom in the world with an 1822 French horse pistol resting in the vanity drawer!

1822 French pistol
1822 French pistol. Guest bathroom, left side of vanity, second drawer down.

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MeoPro 80 the MeoPro 80 HD Spotting Scope: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Meopta MeoPro HD 80
MeoPro 80 HD spotting scope from Meopta.

This report covers:

  • Sometimes you just have to pay the price
  • So what?
  • My tale of woe
  • Meopta
  • The scope
  • Not a fair test
  • My evaluation

Today’s report is about a piece of equipment that has been central to my entire shooting career, yet one that has troubled and eluded me the entire time — a spotting scope. In fact, I have written about this subject before, through few of you probably remember.

Years ago I told you how I paid more than retail (in a trade) to wrest a Burris spotting scope away from a friend, after seeing how clear and sharp it is. That scope might have been the pick of the litter (it probably was) — performing well beyond the Burris spec for their $250 scope, but what do I care? It’s clear and sharp and lets me see tiny .22-caliber bullet holes in a black bullseye at 100 yards on a sunny day. In short, it does the job — sort of.

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Welcome, fellow Jedi!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Back in the day
  • Parallax
  • Twist rate and rifling styles
  • Velocity versus accuracy
  • Oh, how far we have come!

I was going to show you a brand new spotting scope today, but something came up that I want to address. I don’t always respond to your comments these days — there are simply too many of them for me to cover. But I at least scan all of them and I read many of them.

Yesterday it dawned on me as I was reading the comments — many of you are ready to take your test to become full-fledged Jedi knights! A few may even go on to become Jedi masters. Well done, my enthusiastic Padawan learners!

Whenever I write about a technical subject I cringe, thinking of all the questions it will bring. That used to be bad, because I had to answer each any every question myself. But that isn’t the case anymore. I have been following conversations between Bulldawg76, GunFun1 and ChrisUSA and I am amazed at the level of expertise being displayed. I remember when each of them first started commenting on the blog, and they don’t seem like the same people anymore.

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Teach me to shoot: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

This is the continuing fictional saga and guest report of a man teaching a woman to shoot. Today Jack and Jill look at other possible defense weapons for her, and Jill makes her selection! Jill also tells Jack about a Babes with Bullets training camp she recently attended.

Our guest writer is reader, Jack Cooper. Take it away, Jack.

Teach me to shoot

by Jack Cooper

This report covers:

  • Jill went to camp
  • Grouping the campers
  • Sized for everyone
  • One hand or two?
  • More defense revolvers
  • Bottom line
  • Hospital security
  • More training
  • B.B. is next

Jill went to camp

I didn’t write a report last week because Jill was attending a Babes with Bullets training camp. She returned completely on fire for shooting and had made a new friend. Babes with Bullets has different camps, and Jill was in the one called Beginner Handgun. She said the camp went over the same safety fundamentals we did, then they started shooting with low-recoil handguns in .22 rimfire instead of airguns. That makes sense, because they only have three days, where Jill and I had a lot more time.

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UTG Rapid Mission Deployment Daypack

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Back story
  • No sale!
  • UTG Rapid Mission Deployment Daypack
  • Designed by a traveler
  • How I use the pack now
  • Other uses for the pack
  • Quality
  • Why this report

Sometimes I have to step out of the mold and tell you about a great product that may not sound like it applies to airguns. In truth, it can and does apply, but only if you make it do so.

Back story

I was in the aisles at the 2016 SHOT Show on the last day — about 3 hours from catching the shuttle to the airport to return home. Suddenly my computer case handle broke! I call it a computer case, but it’s actually a small traveling office that weighs about 33 lbs. when packed. Time for me to go into the Boy Scout mode and improvise — because I am sure not carrying that load under my arm (left the strap at home — the case is too heavy for it) around through the exhibit hall for three hours, then the casino and then the airport!

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Umarex Brodax CO2 revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Brodax revolver
Umarex Brodax revolver.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Installing the CO2 cartridge
  • Using the new eye
  • The test
  • Next — Hornady Black Diamonds
  • Umarex BBs
  • Daisy Match Grade Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Bottom line

I think you all know how I feel about this Brodax revolver from Umarex. At first sight I thought it was odd-looking and even cartoonish in appearance, but after shooting it in the velocity test I fell in love with the feel. I said then that if the Brodax is an accurate gun, it will be a keeper. Today we find out whether that’s the case.

Installing the CO2 cartridge

This time I remembered that there is an Allen wrench inside the left grip panel to tighten the piercing screw on the CO2 cartridge. As always, I put a drop of Crosman Pellgunoil on the tip of the new cartridge and it sealed instantly when it was pierced. I was ready to test.

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The rise of the accurate pellet: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Up to this point
  • What came next?
  • Head size
  • Enter the Pelletgage
  • High-performance expanding pellets
  • Solid “pellets”
  • Lead-free pellets
  • Conclusion

I bet some of you didn’t realize there was so much to making pellets accurate, did you? This is the third installment of this report and we still have some ground to cover.

Up to this point

To summarize, we have learned that the introduction of the diabolo shape made pellet more accurate than ever before and ushered in the age of the accurate airgun. But after that first surge of advancement, pellet makers didn’t really forge ahead. They were comfortable just making diabolo (wasp-waisted, hollow-tailed) pellets. It wasn’t until 60 more years passed that they began to question whether there was more that could be done.

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