by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Umarex Fusion rifle
Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle

Today is the first accuracy test of the Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle. It comes one part late because we spent time looking at the CO2 cap, the adjustable trigger and the power adjuster in Part 3. The power adjuster is straightforward — twist the screw in and increase the striker spring tension to increase power. The trigger, we learned, is adjustable, but the safety slider prevents a very wide range of adjustability. You can modify it if you choose, but I don’t recommend it; and it will void any warranty on the gun. Blog reader mikeiniowa explained how it’s done, but he said to use caution — and I don’t intend doing it to the test gun.

You should now understand how the CO2 cap works, but there’s one additional thing that I think needs to be stressed. The gas exhaust screw on the cap is to use after the CO2 has been depleted. Screw it in and exhaust the remaining pressure. But that isn’t the end because the cap still cannot be taken off safely, as a reader mentioned yesterday. The o-ring that absorbs gas has to be given a lot of time to exhaust that gas and shrink back down to normal size before you attempt to remove the cap. If you try to remove the cap too soon after exhausting the gas, the o-ring will still be swollen and tightly wedged in place. You could tear it if you use too much force on the cap. So, let an hour or two pass before you try to remove the cap; and leave the exhaust screw screwed in, so the remaining gas that leaves the o-ring can get out of the gun. Anyone who has ever owned a Schimel CO2 pistol knows what I am talking about because they had the same problem.

Mounting the scope
The Fusion comes with a 4X32 scope and rings that must be mounted on the gun. The rings are made to clear the rounded receiver top, so don’t think just any rings will work. I want to show you what one of the rings looks like after installation, so you don’t go nuts thinking it’s not on the gun squarely.

Umarex Fusion rifle scope ring
The Fusion receiver is rounded on top, so the bottom of the scope ring must be profiled to clear the hump. The rings that come with the gun are correctly shaped for this. Don’t let the cockeyed jaw piece fool you — this ring is on the rifle straight and tight!

The scope caps have 2 screws each, which is perfect for this gun. There’s no recoil, so 2 screws hold the scope tight enough for good accuracy.

Once the scope was mounted, I sighted-in at 10 meters. All of today’s shooting will be from 10 meters for reasons I will explain as we go. I’m telling you that because the groups will be smaller than if they were shot at 25 yards. I do plan on testing the Fusion at 25 yards, too, but first I have to establish what it can do closer.

One additional thing about the sight-in. All the pellets struck the target low at 10 meters. I accepted that for the whole test, and I had to adjust the scope up very high to even get that. You know how nervous that makes me! So, at the end of this test I’ll shim the rear scope ring and try one more group with the best pellet. The groups you’ll be seeing are either low on the bull or just beneath it.

JSB Exact RS
The first group was shot with the JSB Exact RS pellet. As I shot, I could see all the pellets going into the same place; although with the 4x scope, it wasn’t easy to see exactly how good it was until I went downrange. It turned out that 10 pellets made a 0.286-inch group, measured between centers. And this group is very round, which is a good sign that everything is right with the rifle.

Umarex Fusion rifle JSB Exact group
Ten JSB Exact RS pellets made this 0.286-inch group at 10 meters. Remember — this is only 10 meters, so the groups are going to be smaller. But this is a great group!

I observed several things while shooting the first group. The first is the trigger, while having a very long second stage pull that you can feel, is very controllable. Next, I did find the rifle just a bit fiddly to load. Once I got the hang of it, however, I was able to load pretty fast. But the pellets tend to flip around in the trough — especially the domes!

And, finally, I noted how very quiet the Fusion is! Our female cat, who usually walks around the house complaining every time I shoot, found it hard to hear what I was doing unless she was in the room with me. Even then, the noise didn’t seem to bother her, though Edith did say she walked into her office to complain once. Other than that, she was quiet. I think any apartment-dweller could shoot this rifle indoors without bothering the neighbors.

H&N Baracuda Match
Next, it was time to test the H&N Baracuda Match pellets. They landed higher on the target than the RS pellets but were still below the point of aim. This group measured 0.345 inches and was just as round as the RS group.

Umarex Fusion rifle HN Baracuda group
Ten H&N Baracuda Match pellets made this 0.345-inch group at 10 meters. Once again, the group is round and quite small.

Crosman SSP hollowpoint
Then I tried the lightweight lead-free Crosman SSP hollowpoint. I didn’t expect much from these pellets, but I tried them because I’d used them in the velocity test. They produced a 10-shot group that measures 1.66 inches between centers. Obviously, I’m not going to shoot this pellet at 25 yards and risk hitting the walls of my house or the furniture! This is why I started shooting at 10 meters.

Umarex Fusion rifle Grosman SSP hollowpoint group
Ten Crosman SSP hollowpoint lead-free pellets went into 1.66 inches at 10 meters. Several seem to have gone through while tumbling. Not the pellet for the Fusion!

RWS Hobby
The last pellet I tested was the RWS Hobby wadcutter. Ten went into 0.59 inches at 10 meters. But the first pellet went to the left of the next 9, so I think this might be one of those times when conditioning the bore was required for best results. Not that I believe in that theory, mind you, but this time it really looked like that’s what was happening. The 9 pellets went into 0.36 inches — a much better showing! The Hobby is the third best pellet in the test, but I think the group of 9 is more representative of what it can do.

Umarex Fusion rifle RWS Hobby group
Ten RWS Hobbys went into 0.59 inches, but the last 9 went into a much tighter 0.36 inches.

The JSB Exact RS and the H&N Baracuda Match are the 2 pellets I’ll test at 25 yards. I would include the Hobbys, but 25 yards is right where wadcutters start to spread out, so I’ll just go with the 2 domes. However, there’s still one more thing to try today.

I removed the scope and put one plastic shim on the bottom of the rear ring under the scope tube, then installed the scope again. I went back to 10 meters without any sight-in shots and shot one more group with JSB Exact RS pellets. The group moved up over 1-1/4 inches and over to the left by a half-inch. This is where I will begin shooting at 25 yards, knowing that I’ll probably need to decrease the elevation to get back on target. Isn’t that interesting, that the point of impact moved up so much with a single shim? The shim measured 0.013 inches, by the way.

Umarex Fusion rifle JSB Exact group after shimming
Ten JSB Exact RS pellets went into 0.244 inches at 10 meters. It’s the best group of the day! This group was fired after a 0.013-inch shim was placed between the scope and the rear ring. The scope was then simply remounted and no sight-in was done. This group is about 1.30 inches higher than the first group. It also appears to be smaller, but the dark paper hides the true size of the pellets.

Impressions so far
The Fusion is a winner! I like everything about it. It has taken some time to understand; but now that we’ve been through the design and know what to expect, you show me another air rifle that costs $170 and shoots like this one. We’re talking groups very similar to what vintage 10-meter target rifles can produce.

No — it’s not a good rifle for hunting; and, no, I don’t think it can be modified to become one. If that’s what you want, get a Discovery. Leave the Fusion as it is — a nice, quiet, accurate rifle.

25-yard testing yet to come.