Daisy 22SG multi-pump pneumatic: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Daisy 22SG
Daisy 22SG.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Old 22SG
  • Warmup
  • First 10-pump shot string
  • Oh, oh! What happened?
  • Did it need more oil?
  • Variable pumps
  • Help!
  • Fixed
  • Second 10-pump shot string
  • Variable pumps again
  • Heavy pellet
  • Trigger pull
  • Pump effort
  • Summary

Well! If the comments are any indicator I would say that this report has struck a nerve! Apparently if you don’t currently own a Daisy 22SG now you used to, or you wanted to, or you own/owned an 822 or a 22X, which are the same rifles without the scope. I saw the same kind of enthusiasm on the internet in general. The 22SG is an air rifle people remember!

Today is the day we test velocity, but I’m going to make it something a little more than just that. Several of you are asking me about the automatic transmission sealer that I tout for fixing the seals on old pneumatics and gas guns. You say I don’t specify what exactly it is. Well, I’m doing so right now. The stuff I use is called Bar’s Leaks (that’s the name of the company) Transmission Stop Leak Concentrate. I have written about it numerous times, including the report titled A proven CO2 fix for leaking guns. read more


IZH 46M target pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

IZH 46M
IZH 46M single stroke target pistol.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • New in the box
  • Comparisons
  • Single stroke pneumatic
  • The IZH advantage
  • Difference between the IZH 46 and 46M
  • Power
  • Accuracy
  • Trigger
  • Sights
  • Grips
  • Weight
  • Can it be scoped?
  • The tests
  • Value
  • Importation
  • Not weapons!
  • Scarcity creates demand!
  • Summary

Today we begin a report on a target pistol that has become legendary — the IZH 46, and more specifically the IZH 46M that is the later magnum version. I picked this one up in a recent purchase that included the two IZH MP532 target rifles I’ve been writing about.

New in the box

This pistol was new in the box with everything that originally came from the factory. It had been used as a display gun at an NRA show, but I don’t think it was fired very much. According to its official certificate of acceptance, it was made in October of 2005, so although it is relatively recent it’s still been sitting around for a long time and will need some attention that I will document. read more


IZH MP532 target rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

IZH MP532
IZH MP532 single stroke target rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Got it!
  • Adjusted the butt
  • Fixed the rear sight
  • Windage adjustment
  • Sight adjustment
  • The test
  • Discussion 1
  • Discussion2
  • Discussion 3
  • Summary

Got it!

Sometimes BB gets it right, and today is one of those times. Got a lot to tell you so let’s get started.

Adjusted the butt

I’m shooting the newer (made in 2007) IZH MP532 today and the butt had been adjusted for maximum length of pull in an earlier report. This time I put it back to where it started, with the butt pad flush against the wood on the stock.

Fixed the rear sight

Part 4 covers the design and quirks of the rear sight in great detail, so read that to see what I discovered and what I did to fix it. I will show you one more thing today. read more


Beeman C1: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman C1
My new Beeman C1 is a .177.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Take this gun
  • History
  • Artillery hold
  • A compromise
  • Smoother with use
  • Use a mainspring compressor!
  • The test rifle
  • Description
  • The breech
  • Barrel pivot
  • This C1 has
  • The plan
  • Goal

Sometimes you buy airguns because you long for them. Other times you buy them on the recommendation of others. And every so often a good deal just pops up and you feel you really need to take it. Such is the case with this .177-caliber Beeman C1 that I bought at the 2019 Texas Airgun Show.

Take this gun

A man walked up to my table holding a Beeman C1 that was scoped with a Beeman SS1 scope. The price he asked was so reasonable that I didn’t hesitate buying it, and, before long, reader David Enoch walked over and asked to buy the scope. I sold it to him, and I was left with just the rifle for a very reasonable price. read more


Smith & Wesson 78G and 79G target pistols: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

S&W 78G
My S&W 78G pistol.

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Today’s report is written by reader 45Bravo. This is his report to us on the Daisy air pistols that followed the S&W 78G and 79G.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, over to you, 45Bravo.

The decline of the Smith & Wesson 78-79 series

This report covers:

  • History
  • What’s on the outside
  • On the inside
  • Daisy trigger
  • Daisy model 41
  • Daisy 7900?
  • So, how do they shoot?
  • S&W #2074 has Mac1 upgrades in valve poppet and valve spring, and o-rings
  • S&W #3248 has factory poppet and valve spring, but new o-rings
  • S&W 79G has factory poppet and valve spring, with new o-rings
  • The Daisy 790 has Mac1 upgraded poppet and valve spring and o-rings
  • Why would I throw over $100 in parts into a Daisy 790?
  • Summary
  • The Daisy Line?

The decline of the Smith & Wesson 78-79 series

These observations come from having 4 of the guns at my disposal at this time.
A 78g serial number 2074, with a manual dated 4/71.
A 78g, serial number 3248.
A 79g, serial number 294,6XX, with a manual dated revised 11/77
And a Daisy 790, serial number 3J00891 (third change). read more


Diana model 26 breakbarrel air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 26
The Diana 26 air rifle.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The deal
  • What is it?
  • Earlier model 26
  • Blue Book of Airguns
  • Trigger
  • Stock
  • Description
  • Sights
  • Comparison to the 27
  • Summary

I have written a lot about Diana air rifles over the course of this blog. A quick look finds 2 articles about the Diana model 25, and 6 articles about the Diana 27. There are probably more on each rifle, but they may be titled so I can’t find them. While I have written a lot about these Diana models, I never heard of the Diana 26 until reader Carel from the Netherlands told me he had one.

The deal

Back in February I mentioned on the blog that I would like to find a Diana model 35 to detune, just to see how sweet it could be. Carel contacted me and told me he had a nice old one I might like. Then he told me about this model 26. I had never heard of it, and he tells me they are quite scarce in Europe, too. I think the gap between the models 25 and 27 was too narrow to support another model. read more


The Beeman R10/HW 85: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 85
Weihrauch HW 85.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Crosman Premiers
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 5.51mm heads
  • Top speed?
  • Hobbys
  • Firing cycle
  • Cocking
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation so far

Today we learn how powerful this smooth-shooting .22-caliber HW85 is. You may remember from Part 1 that I bought this rifle because of its super-smooth tune. So, let’s get right to it.

Crosman Premiers

The first pellet to be tested was the 14.3-grain Crosman Premier. These loaded easily and averaged 678 f.p.s. The range went from 672 to 693 — a spread of 21 f.p.s. At the average velocity this pellet produces 14.6 foot pounds. This was so close to the “magic” velocity of 671 f.p.s., where the weight of the pellet in grains equals the muzzle energy in foot pounds. I mention that because it’s just a handy thing to know. read more