HW 35 Luxus: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

HW35
HW35 Luxus.

This report covers:

  • Barrel droop
  • First pellet
  • Next pellets
  • Bottom line

Before I begin, I must tell you that my wife, Edith, passed away yesterday, Sunday, July 26 at 10 a.m., Central. She was under sedation and unaware of what was happening.

Edith
Edith Gaylord will be missed.

Edith wanted me to tell you what happened. We actually talked about it last week. I am not in a frame of mind to write much these days, but I promised her the blog would carry on. Those of you who visit my socnets could help me by posting a comment regarding this, because I haven’t got the time to go there.

I said I would come back to this rifle and mount a scope because so many of you asked me to. Today is the day. read more


HW 35 Luxus: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • Disassembly
  • Rekord trigger
  • End cap comes out
  • Mainspring and guide come out
  • Piston is next
  • Assembly
  • The safety
  • Back together
  • What’s next?

Today, we’ll look inside the HW 35 Luxus to see what we find. I’ve thought from the beginning that this is a tuned air rifle, and I’ve given you the clues why. The baseblock is lubricated with some heavy grease that Weihrauch never used, and the safety seems to be defeated.

I also want to find out what material the piston seal is made of. If it’s leather, it needs more frequent lubrication than a synthetic seal would need.

Disassembly

Disassembling most Weihrauch air rifles is easy. Only the R9/HW95 and the new HW50 have those 4 tabs that hold the very thin end cap in the rifle and are a little harder to deal with. But this HW 35 is an old-school Weihrauch that has a threaded end cap. read more


HW 35 Luxus: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • Trigger adjustment
  • 150 shots
  • In the beginning
  • Best pellet
  • Doubting Thomas
  • No target sights
  • No scope
  • The solution
  • Stock screws
  • Barrel pivot
  • Day two
  • What’s next?

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of my HW35 Luxus. I’m shooting from a rest at 25 yards, and the gun lies directly on the sandbag. I tried holding it with the artillery hold, and it made no difference in group size.

Trigger adjustment

I tested the Rekord trigger before starting and found it was releasing at 2 lbs., 9 oz. That’s a bit too heavy for a Rekord, so I backed out the aluminum trigger adjustment screw as far as it would go and learned something valuable. On the lightest adjustment, the stage-two release of this trigger is just 14 oz. That’s too light for a sporting rifle. It’s almost like a match Rekord that has a lighter return spring. So, I tightened the screw until the release was exactly 1 lb., 8 oz. That feels both safe and right. read more


HW 35 Luxus: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • Freimark
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • JSB Exact pellets, 8.44-grain dome
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • But wait — there’s more!
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger-pull
  • What’s next?

Today, we’ll find out what kind of powerplant is in my new HW35 Luxus. Is it really a 5.5 foot-pound gun, as the German Freimark (capitol F in a pentagram) indicates, or is it something different?

Freimark

The Freimark is a legal designation from the German government. Guns that have it must not produce over 7.5 joules of energy at the muzzle. That converts to 5.53 foot-pounds. If they qualify, such guns are legal for persons 18 years and older to purchase and own as airguns. If they produce more than 7.5 joules, they are classified as firearms and are controlled by those laws. read more


HW 35 Luxus: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • The HW35
  • Barrel lock
  • Sights
  • Weight and length
  • Me and the HW35

I’m going to start this report by eating some crow. Or is it humble pie? I never remember. I want to say at the start of this report that reader Dom was right, and I was wrong about my new HW35 Luxus. Dom told me that his 35 had a Freimark (a capitol F inside a pentagram — the German symbol for airguns developing less than 7.5 joules) and he wondered if mine did, as well. If it did that might be why it shoots so smooth. I told him my gun didn’t have one.

Except it does. A great big one!

You see, I got 2 air rifles at the Malvern show — this HW35 and a BSF S54. When I looked at the gun for Dom I looked at the S54 instead of the 35. read more


Can a pellet gun go “overbore”?

by B.B. Pelletier

There’s a new instructional video on Airgun Academy. It’s all about dot sights. Click to see it.

Announcement: Mary Kulesa Geraci is this week’s winner of Pyramyd Air’s Big Shot of the Week on their facebook page. She’ll receive a $50 Pyramyd Air gift card.

Mary Kulesa Geraci wins this week’s Big Shot of the Week.

Last week at a gun show, I learned something that eluded me all my life. I learned what overbore means and why it matters so much.

I was introduced to the .250 Savage cartridge, which is also called the .250/3000. It is one of the smaller .25-caliber cartridges today, but when it was first introduced back in the early part of the 20th century it was a screamer — the fastest .25-caliber cartridge around. It wasn’t the biggest, mind you. That honor probably went to the .25 Krag, which was a .30/40 Krag necked down to .25 caliber. It held more powder, but its bullets went no faster. read more


Beeman R1 – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Testing by Earl “Mac” McDonald

The R1 Elite Series combo comes with a Bushnell 4-12x40AO scope mounted.

Well, we had to get to the Beeman R1 before long. After all, it’s a Weihrauch rifle and probably the one model that American airgunners are the most familiar with. Back in its heyday, which was the very early 1980s, it was, for a brief time, the most powerful spring-piston air rifle around. It was also the first airgun to be designed by a CAD system.

The engineer who did the computer work for Dr. Beeman meets me every year at the Little Rock Airgun Expo, and he sometimes tells me tidbits of what that development was like. At the time, they didn’t have a large body of test data to design from, so they modeled all sorts of possible performance enhancements until they found the correct blend. read more