Crosman model 116 .22-caliber bulk-fill CO2 pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Neat fix for bulk-fill CO2 guns

Crosman 116 pistol
Crosman’s 116 bulk-fill pistol is a .22-caliber single-shot pistol with power and accuracy that surpasses many of today’s air pistols.

Before we start, a word on the “fix” for CO2 guns that Dennis Quackenbush gave me. Some folks are concerned that this will ruin the guns it’s put into. Well, it will soften the seals, and eventually those seals will dissolve into a jelly-like material that won’t seal the gun. How fast that happens depends on how much of the automatic transmission sealer you use. But here’s my thinking. The gun already doesn’t work. If this restores it to operation for a few years, or even for only a few more months, that’s more than you have now. In the end, you may need to replace all the seals anyway, but that was what you faced when you decided to do this. No permanent harm has been done. And you got some use from a gun that needed seals.

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Benjamin Marauder .25 caliber: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Secrets of loading the Benjamin Marauder magazine
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Fixing a Marauder magazine
Part 7

Benjamin Marauder
Benjamin Marauder

This report is an emotional one for me. The last time I tried to report on the .25-caliber Benjamin Marauder, I became very ill and it took me two years to complete the test. In fact, I never did complete the test myself because I was in the hospital part of the time. My buddy, Mac, drove from his home in Maryland to Texas to test airguns for me so he could bank a lot of data and pictures that allowed me to write my blogs from a hospital bed. Mac is now gone, and I’m starting all over again with this rifle.

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Neat fix for bulk-fill CO2 guns

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Today, I’m going to tell you about a low-cost fix I got from airgun maker Dennis Quackenbush for bulk-fill CO2 guns.

Dennis bought a Crosman model 116 bulk-fill pistol that leaked, and rather than changing the seals, he injected automatic transmission sealing oil into the gun and sealed it that way. What this sealer does is rejuvenate the synthetic seals and make them swell to do their job again. Dennis said the procedure worked well in his gun.

Could I do the same? In the past, I have written about “fixing” CO2 guns by injecting several drops of Crosman Pellgunoil into the gun with the charge of CO2. That works for both bulk-fill guns and for those that use cartridges. This would be the next step. I just happened to have a Crosman model 116 bulk-fill pistol on hand that hasn’t worked in the 5 years I have owned it. I think I paid $30 for it at an airgun show, and did so hoping to fix it with Pellgunoil. I tried, but the seals were too far gone, and it didn’t work. So, I set the gun aside, always intending to do something about it.

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Target tips: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Long-time readers know that I preach about buying commercial targets made with real target paper rather than making your own. Targets that are home-printed are usually worse than useless — they actually don’t tell you anything because of how badly the paper tears.

Today, I have to amend that comment. Life is full of contradictions, so get ready for one from me. There’s one instance where I use targets that I print because they’re better than any commercial targets I’ve found.

I spend a lot of my shooting time on the 100-yard range, working on various loads for several scoped rifles. I’ve shown you the fruits of this shooting many times in the past. One time, I showed you how 10 first shots (shots fired from a dead-cold barrel) could group especially well from a Savage model 1920 rifle of mine in .250 Savage (.250-3000) caliber. The target I used for that report was a conventional bull. As long as the sun was bright, I had no problem seeing where I was aiming; but with scopes of lower power or with those whose optics are slightly muddy, all precision is lost.

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Testing the effect of hold on an accurate spring-piston air rifle

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Calling the shot and follow-through
Settling into a firing position

Today’s report is one of those serendipitous events that happen when I think I’m investigating something simple and it turns out to be a treasure trove of shooting information. I thought today’s test was a demonstration of how settling into a firing position and following through would give a better group from an air rifle of proven accuracy. What I got was that and more!

I chose the .177-caliber Beeman R8 air rifle and JSB Exact RS pellet for this test because, in the past, this has proved to be a great combination. I shot 10-shot groups at 25 yards, which should show any differences if they really exist. Initially, I’d thought to shoot the rifle in a deer-hunter hold (meaning that I grasped the stock and pulled it firmly into my shoulder), an artillery hold without the tension being taken out of my hold (in other words, holding the rifle lightly, but held on target by muscle power and not by relaxing and adjusting the hold) and finally by settling in properly with an artillery hold. However, as I started this test, I thought that I’d also shoot the rifle directly off the sandbag to show how that affected the group size.

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Tales from the range

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

I was at the rifle range yesterday and there were some things that I had to tell you. There’s no order to this — it’s just what I want to say.

First thing, I get to the range and there’s a young man with 3 very fine rifles. One has been custom made for him, and the other 2 are factory models that each have some add-ons such as aftermarket triggers. He mentioned that he had just gotten rid of a .257 Weatherby Magnum from which he was unable to get good groups.

Each of his rifles had a Leupold Vari X III scope, which is not a cheap sight. There are couple thousand dollars worth of fine firearms and sights laying on his bench. But every 10 minutes or so, he asks if the range can go cold so he can walk down to the 100-yard target holder and look at his targets. That’s right, sports fans, he hasn’t got a spotting scope!

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Benjamin Marauder PCP .177-caliber air rifle: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Secrets of loading the Benjamin Marauder magazine
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Fixing a Marauder magazine

Benjamin Marauder
Benjamin Marauder

Today, we’ll adjust the Benjamin Marauder PCP air rifle to accept a lower maximum fill pressure and still deliver about the same velocity as before. Before we get into the report, let’s consider for a moment what we’re about to do. As far as I know, the Marauder is the only PCP on the market that allows this kind of adjustment to be made. A great many PCPs have adjustable power, and indeed, the Marauder’s adjustment process for power has been sharply criticized on the internet…mostly by people who don’t appreciate how it works in conjunction with this other adjustment that’s unique to this rifle.

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