The Diana model 10/Beeman 900 target pistol: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman 900
The Beeman 900 pistol is another form of Diana’s model 10.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle
  • RWS R10 Pistol
  • Qiang Yuan Match Grade pellets
  • H&N Finale Match Light 
  • No crazy person here!
  • …or?
  • Summary

Today I’m going back to the Beeman 900 that is a rebadged Diana 10 target pistol. I didn’t do so well in Part 3 and you readers were all over me to not rest the gun directly on the sandbag, but to rest my forearms on the bag and hold the pistol loose in front of the bag. So that’s what I did today — sort of. This turns into a much larger test than planned, and isn’t that always a good thing?

The test

I shot from 10 meters and at the start of the test I rested my forearms on the bag and held the pistol in my hands in front of the bag. I shot 5-shot groups because I wanted to test a lot of different pellets and the way things turned out, I’m glad I did! read more


Winchester 422: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Winchester 422
Winchester’s 422 is another lower-powered breakbarrel from the 1960s and ’70s.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • Told you!
  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle
  • RWS Superpoint
  • RWS R10 Match Heavy
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • RWS Superdomes
  • What to do?
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm heads
  • Summary

Today we test the Winchester 422/Diana 22 with the new front sight attached. Reader Breeze was kind enough to donate this sight to the cause.

422 front sight
Reader Breeze sent me this new Diana front sight to replace the bent one. Thank you, Breeze!

422 sight installed
The new front sight looks great on the rifle!

Told you!

It’s a day for reader GunFun1 to put on his , “Told you so!” shoes, because the barrel is definitely bent up. But what I didn’t know until today is it may also be bent a little to the right. Looking at the front sight through the rear notch, it seems off to the right a little. We’ll see what happens as the test progresses. read more


Something different — The Wandering Earth pistol

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Wandering Earth
  • Plot
  • The pistol
  • The manual
  • Done!
  • What does it shoot?
  • How powerful?
  • Summary

Happy Thanksgiving to my US readers!

Wandering Earth

Well, you can’t stay bored by this! Today we look at a catapult pistol inspired by the Chinese sci-fy film classic, Wandering Earth. It has grossed more than US $700 million, worldwide.

Plot

In the year 2161 the earth is threatened by an aging sun that will expand into a red giant and engulf the planet within 300 years. So to preserve life, enormous planetary thrusters are positioned around the globe to push the earth out of the solar system and to the Alpha Centuri star system, which, at only 4.2 light years, is closest to us.

I won’t spoil the plot for you, except to say that it takes a LONG time to make the journey and life as we know it has to undergo some drastic changes. Apparently one of those changes is to make use of the incredibly fat double action only catapult signal pistol that we are looking at today. read more


Springfield Armory M1A Underlever Pellet Rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

M1A
Springfield Armory M1A.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight in
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Air Arms Diabolo Field Heavy
  • RWS Hobby
  • Accuracy with all pellets
  • H&N Sniper Magnum 
  • Discussion
  • Air Arms 10-shot group
  • Boxing the target
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the Springfield Armory M1A underlever pellet rifle. Today I will shoot with the sights that came on the rifle. There is a lot to do so let’s get started.

The test

I shot the rifle off a rest from 10 meters. I used an artillery hold because this rifle is powerful and does move around when it fires. I shot 5-shot groups so I could test more pellets and do more tests, as you will see.

Sight in

It took nine shots to sight in the rifle. It was initially shooting low and to the left so I had to bring it up several inches and also about an inch to the right. The manual shows using a center hold on your target which is appropriate for shooting at personnel with a military rifle. This is a pellet version of a battle rifle after all. But for shooting at bullseye targets a 6 o’clock hold is far more precise. So that’s what I did. read more


Oil talk — and no action!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • WD40
  • WD40 as penetrating oil?
  • Not for clocks!
  • Air Rifle Headquarters
  • Light oils
  • Use for airguns
  • Special purpose weapons-grade oil
  • Household oil
  • Special purpose oils
  • Ballistol
  • Silicone lubricating oils
  • Silicone chamber oil
  • Crosman Pellgunoil
  • Summary

Okay — today is a report several of you readers asked for — some common sense talk about which oils to use on airguns, and where. It has to be common sense because I am not a petroleum engineer. I’m just a guy like you who has used a lot of oils over my 73+ years. And I will start with the one that started the discussion.

WD40

WD40 was created in 1953 by a small aerospace engineering firm called Rocket Chemical Company. They were looking for a formula to displace water for the aerospace industry. On their 40th attempt they succeeded and called the product WD40.

Aerospace contractor Convair first used WD40 to protect the outer skin of the Atlas missile from rust and corrosion. It worked so well that some employees sneaked some cans out of the plant to use at home. A few years later, Rocket Chemical founder Norm Larsen put WD40 into aerosol cans, to see if the public would find uses for it. It hit the shelves in San Diego, Rocket Chemical’s home, in 1958. read more


Winchester 422: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Winchester 422
Winchester’s 422 is another lower-powered breakbarrel from the 1960s and ’70s.

Part 1
Part 2

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle
  • Not doing well
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Good news
  • Discussion
  • Fish
  • Summary

Today’s report will be interesting. It confirms what we all thought and it absolutely ASTOUNDS in one surprising area! Grab your coffee and let’s get started.

The test

Today is accuracy day — or what will be the first accuracy day for the Winchester 422 pellet rifle. I’ll explain as we go. I shot the rifle off a rest at 10 meters from the target. I used the artillery hold for most of the test, and I’ll tell you when I switched to letting the rifle rest directly on the sandbag. I shot ten-shot groups at 10-meter air rifle targets, and I shot with the open sights on the rifle. Remember — that front sight is bent down and to the left, so we will learn whether that was intentional or it just slipped and banged into something. read more


Winchester 422: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Winchester 422
Winchester’s 422 is another lower-powered breakbarrel from the 1960s and ’70s.

Part 1

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • Preparation
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • RWS Hobby
  • RWS Meisterkugeln Heavy
  • Something else
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today we look at the power of the Winchester 422 I’m reviewing. The 422 is in the same power class as the Diana 23, so I’m hoping to see some lightweight pellets in the 400 f.p.s. range.

Preparation

We have looked at several vintage breakbarrel springers in this blog in recent times. You readers are now reminding me of things to do before shooting one of them. 

First, check the breech seal. That’s what lead to the El Gamo David report being stopped until I can replace the seal. When I examined this Winchester 422 seal it looked to be in good condition. Breech seals in the Diana 22 and 23 are located on the end of the spring tube and not at the rear of the barrel. I believe that’s because of the small size of the airgun. There isn’t room for a substantial seal on the end of the barrel. read more