Daisy Number 12 model 29 single shot BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Daisy model 29
Daisy Number 12 model 29 single shot BB gun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The gun
  • Hough front sight
  • Loading
  • The BB changed from lead to steel
  • Getting 0.175-inch lead shot
  • Darts, too!
  • Summary

Sometimes we like things for reasons that make no sense to others, though we know why. Today’s report focuses on a BB gun that I have liked for many years, after discovering late in life that it existed at all.

The gun

Daisy’s Number 12 Model 29 is a lever action BB gun with a difference. It looks older than it is. It resembles a Daisy model H that was made from 1913 to 1923. The strangest thing about the model H is the cocking lever, which catches your eye immediately. In many respects these guns look similar to the more common BB guns we know today, but that cocking lever seems strange. I have not read an explanation for why it looks like it does, so allow me to posit a guess — leverage. read more


Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

Crosman 101
Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Baseline test
  • Hard to cock!
  • Consistency
  • RWS Hobbys
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Baracuda Match — 5.53mm heads
  • Trigger pull
  • Barrel problems?
  • Perspective

Today we look at the power my old Crosman 101 multi-pump produces. I haven’t tested it in years, so this will be as fresh to me as it is to all of you. Let’s get to it.

Baseline test

First I want to establish the velocity with differing numbers of pump strokes. Here goes. I will use the 14.3-grain Crosman Premier pellet for this.

Strokes………………..Velocity (f.p.s.)……………..Increase
2…………………………….350………………………………–
3…………………………….437………………………………87
4…………………………….496………………………………59
5…………………………….542………………………………46
6…………………………….578………………………………36
7…………………………….612………………………………34
8…………………………….635 no air remaining………….23
9…………………………….667 no air remaining………….32
10…………………………..687 no air remaining…………..20 read more


Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Crosman 101
Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Crosman-101-classic
  • Description
  • Peep sight
  • Cocking knobs
  • Materials
  • History
  • Maintenance
  • Crosman 101CG

I was trying to report on rebuilding the Daisy 853 today, but a last-minute change prevented that. One of our readers, Paperweight, sent me Daisy’s very detailed .pdf file on rebuilding the 753/853 that has far more detail than the one on Pilkington’s website. It includes some steps that Pilkington overlooks, and those steps are vital. He also told me that the brown o-ring goes on the action and the black one goes on the pump piston. I had followed someone else’s directions and had them reversed. So I had to backtrack and switch the o-rings, plus I used the more detailed Daisy instructions to assemble the gun. I’ll tell you more when I do that report. read more


Haenel model 100 BB pistol and Daisy number 12 model 29 BB gun: Parts 2 and 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Haenel 100: Part 1
Daisy number 12 model 29: Part 1
Daisy number 12 model 29: Part 2

Haenel BB pistol
The Haenel 100 BB pistol is a pre-war 50-shot repeater.

Daisy model 29
Daisy Number 12 Model 20 is a vintage BB gun.

This report covers:

  • Haenel 100 first
  • Precision Ground Shot
  • The test
  • Haenel accuracy
  • Daisy model 29 accuracy
  • First target
  • The turning point!
  • Target two
  • Conclusions

I am combining two reports today — the Haenel model 100 BB pistol and the Daisy number 12 model 29 BB gun. Please don’t get confused. If you have been following the series on the Daisy 29, you know that something good must have happened for me to do this special report. Indeed it did! Let’s get started.

Haenel 100 first

The first task was to chronograph the Haenel pistol. You may recall that the Blue Book of Airguns informs us that the Haenel 100 uses 4.4 mm lead balls, so I started with them. read more


Daisy Number 12, Model 29 BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

Daisy Number 12, Model 29 BB gun: Part 1

Daisy model 29
Daisy Number 12 Model 20 is a vintage BB gun.

This report covers:

  • Preparation
  • Daisy BBs
  • Air Venturi BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Shooting to the left?
  • Accuracy
  • No joy
  • 4.4 mm lead balls
  • Conclusion

Today we will look at both the accuracy and power of the Daisy Model 12 Number 29 BB gun you all seemed to enjoy. Let’s get to it

Preparation

This vintage BB gun has a leather plunger (piston seal), so I made sure it was well oiled before I started the velocity test. I had soaked the plunger in oil for several weeks before this test.

Daisy BBs

First up were Daisy Premium Grade BBs. They averaged 307 f.p.s. through the chronograph. The low was 299 f.p.s and the high was 327 f.p.s., so the total spread was 28 f.p.s. That’s pretty fast for a conventional spring-powered BB gun by today’s standards. I wasn’t expecting much over 250 f.p.s.. read more


Daisy Number 12, Model 29 BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

Daisy model 29
Daisy Number 12 Model 29 is a vintage BB gun.

This report covers:

  • For Reb
  • The gun
  • Welded tube
  • Hard to cock
  • Sights
  • Single shot?
  • No chrome
  • Shot tube

This is about a BB gun you fondly remember, but never heard of.

HUH?

Today’s BB gun looks like many others from the turn of the century, especially the model H that lasted from 1913 until 1922. The No. 12 Model 29, however, is a single shot that was produced from 1929 until 1942, when Daisy put BB guns aside for the war effort. Although it is a later gun, it retains many characteristics of much earlier BB guns.

The most notable feature is the cocking lever that has a small finger loop, as opposed to the levers on most Daisys with full sized loops. The lever is cast iron, a vestige of guns made decades earlier. Because it lacks a forearm you can clearly see the sheet metal weld that seals the compression tube. This is where the soldered patch used to be — before Daisy figured out how to weld the thin metal tube airtight. read more