How spring-piston rifles behave

by B.B. Pelletier

Okay, Grasshopper, enough Wax on! Wax off! It’s time to use your skills.

If you’ve been following the discussions over the past month about accuracy, you should now have the tools to be a pretty good judge of the potential accuracy of an air rifle and the relative ease with which that accuracy comes — even before taking the first shot. We’ll confine today’s discussion to just spring-piston guns, since they’re the most difficult to shoot.

How a spring-piston airgun works
This is a review for many of you, but we have enough new readers that perhaps it’s good to go over the points of how the spring-piston gun works. What I’m about to say holds true for guns with gas springs as well as guns with coiled steel mainsprings. They all work the same when it comes to their operation. read more


Crosman TitanGP Nitro Piston (Lower Velocity) – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Happy Thanksgiving!

Part 1
Part 2


The TitanGP with lower velocity is a smooth shooter!

Today is accuracy day! Finally we’ll get to see what this special lower-velocity version of the .22 caliber Crosman TitanGP Nitro Piston can do downrange. First, I’ll address the scope since so many people have commented on it.

The 4×32 CenterPoint Optics scope that comes with the rifle is not adjusted for parallax at close range. When I aimed at the targets 25 yards away, they were slightly out of focus, even at only 4x. That can really drive you nuts, so I have to agree with those who have said you should think about replacing the scope. That being said, however, I don’t think it had a great influence on the outcome of this test. The low magnification probably affected my aim more than the slight focus issue. read more


Crosman TitanGP Nitro Piston (Lower Velocity) – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


The TitanGP with lower velocity is a smooth shooter!

Okay, today I’m going to shoot the Crosman TitanGP with Nitro Piston through the chronograph. Boy, did we have a lot of discussion about this rifle in Part 1, and a lot of folks surprised when they realized that I was talking about an entirely different air rifle than the one they were commenting on. I tried to explain in the report that this is a very different rifle, but quite a few shooters were confused by the more powerful rifle that goes by the same name.

Crosman Corporation, are you reading this? People don’t like it when you name two different guns the same, any more than you would like it if they referred to a Crosman Pumpmaster 760 as a Red Ryder. You drove airgun collectors crazy when you named a Chinese spring piston rifle the Benjamin Super Streak, but in light of the whole Benjamin Sheridan brand name mix, I guess that’s water under the bridge. The point is that different airguns need different names so people can refer to them without getting confused. read more


Crosman TitanGP Nitro Piston (Lower Velocity) – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Before I start, I want to let you know that there are new Airgun Academy videos online.

This past March was a very poignant time for me. I was happily working on a number of exciting airgun projects, oblivious to what was just around the corner. One of those projects was especially dear to my heart, because it took a great idea and went full circle to the best possible conclusion. It wasn’t anything I had a hand in developing, although I very much wish I had, because of what a wonderful result came out.

I am referring to the rifle that Crosman calls the Benjamin Legacy with Nitro Piston. There was an earlier Legacy with a coiled steel mainspring, but the gun I refer to has a Crosman Nitro Piston, a gas spring, if you will. But that isn’t what makes it great. read more