Hatsan 95 combo breakbarrel air rifle: Part 5

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4


The Hatsan 95 came through in the end!

This is part 5 of what would normally be a three-part test. If you’ve followed it, you know all I’ve gone through to let the Hatsan 95 combo breakbarrel look its best. And today’s report was no exception. I spent more time with the rifle than I usually do in part 3 of any other airgun. I guess I had a burr under my saddle blanket about this rifle from the start. It was so nice-looking, and it was also a spring rifle that most adult men can cock, which isn’t that common when it comes to Hatsan breakbarrels. So, I wanted it to succeed. read more


Hatsan 95 combo breakbarrel air rifle: Part 4

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3


The Hatsan 95.

Today, I’ll shoot the Hatsan 95 combo breakbarrel at 25 yards with the scope that comes in the package. This is the day we find out what a value the Hatsan 95 combo really is.

The first step was to mount the scope that came in the Hatsan box. It’s a 3-9×32 fixed-parallax scope that carries the Optima brand name. The scope mount is two-piece, and their straps have two screws each. The rifle comes with a recoil stop plate on top of the spring tube, and two different threaded holes so the plate can be moved forward or back. It was in the rear position on the test gun, and that proved best for the eye relief. read more


Hatsan 95 combo breakbarrel air rifle: Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2


The test rifle was prettier than the photo Hatsan provided for the website.

There has been a lot of interest in the .22-caliber Hatsan 95 combo breakbarrel I’ve been testing! We have even had people emailing Pyramyd Air directly to ask when Part 3 was coming. Folks, they don’t know any more than you do. If you want to know something about the blog, post your comment on the blog and I’ll answer you here.

The Hatsan 95 represents a departure from the other Hatsan spring rifles I’ve tested so far. It’s sized for a normal adult rather than for a giant, and it doesn’t require the strength of Hercules to cock. I found during the velocity testing that the rifle seems to like heavier pellets, so I tested it with some for accuracy. I tested the rifle with open sights because they seem to be a reasonably set even though they’re fiberoptic. read more


Hatsan 95 combo breakbarrel air rifle: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


The test rifle was prettier than the one shown on Pyramyd Air’s website.

Today, I’ll test the velocity of this Hatsan 95 combo breakbarrel. After shooting it for this test, I have to tell you that I’m liking this air rifle. For staters, it isn’t impossible to cock. The barrel requires an effort of 40 lbs. to cock, which is light enough for one-hand cocking (for me) but too heavy for a plinker. It is world’s better than Hatsan’s portable gyms, which go by the model names 155 Torpedo and 125TH.

The second thing this 95 has that those other two don’t is a nice trigger! I mean — right out of the box. There’s a little creep in the second stage, but it’s not much and I can live with it. The trigger of my test rifle breaks at 4 lbs., 10 oz. and the only thing that would make it nicer would be an adjustable overtravel stop. read more


Ruger Air Magnum Combo – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Test and photos by Earl “Mac” McDonald


Ruger’s Air Magnum Combo is a big, new, powerful breakbarrel.

Today, we’ll begin a look at a brand-new übermagnum from Ruger, the Ruger Air Magnum Combo. This is another spring-piston breakbarrel with smashing power, and I can tell you where that power comes from — in a moment.

Mac described the rifle as a Diana RWS 34P on steroids. And, then it hit him. Maybe, it’s really more of a Diana RWS 350P Magnum. Regardless of what it reminds him of, the report will focus on this new rifle, only.

Now, being both a breakbarrel and powerful is going to mean one thing for sure. This rifle will take some technique to shoot well. You’ll have to apply the artillery hold and find and use the one best pellet no matter how many tins of lead sinker larvae you can find on sale at Wal-Mart. You know, praying doesn’t make bad ammo good, and no amount of savings will ever be enough to compensate for the miss you know started out as a good shot. read more


Crosman TitanGP Nitro Piston (Lower Velocity) – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


The TitanGP with lower velocity is a smooth shooter!

Okay, today I’m going to shoot the Crosman TitanGP with Nitro Piston through the chronograph. Boy, did we have a lot of discussion about this rifle in Part 1, and a lot of folks surprised when they realized that I was talking about an entirely different air rifle than the one they were commenting on. I tried to explain in the report that this is a very different rifle, but quite a few shooters were confused by the more powerful rifle that goes by the same name.

Crosman Corporation, are you reading this? People don’t like it when you name two different guns the same, any more than you would like it if they referred to a Crosman Pumpmaster 760 as a Red Ryder. You drove airgun collectors crazy when you named a Chinese spring piston rifle the Benjamin Super Streak, but in light of the whole Benjamin Sheridan brand name mix, I guess that’s water under the bridge. The point is that different airguns need different names so people can refer to them without getting confused. read more