.22-caliber Lightweight Disco Double: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Disco Double new stock
The Lightweight Disco Double in its new stock looks striking!

Today, we’ll look at the Disco Double out at 50 yards. I used the best pellets from the 25-yard test to speed up this test. No sense going over the same ground twice.

The first pellet I tried was the JSB Exact Jumbo RS. It did the best at 25 yards, plus it’s so light, at 13.43 grains, that it gives the rifle a little extra zing.

The rifle arrived at the range filled to 2,000 psi, so I went right to work. I clicked the scope up 5 clicks in elevation to account for the greater distance and began shooting. The day was surprisingly cold — about 28 degrees F. My trigger finger had very little feeling, yet I was able to feel when stage 2 engaged on the trigger every time. That’s important on this rifle because the trigger is very light on stage 2.

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.22-caliber Lightweight Disco Double: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Disco Double new stock
The Lightweight Disco Double in its new stock looks striking!

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of the Disco Double. Before that, however, I mounted a scope, a TKO airgun silencer that they call a muzzlebrake or a lead dust collector, and something I’ve never seen in print before but something I’ve used on many precharged air rifles over the years — a bolt keeper!

What’s a bolt keeper?
First, let me tell you that when I mounted the TKO silencer, it fit the barrel perfectly. There were no barrel alignment issues that I was warned about, and I checked closely. This unit is very well made and looks beautiful on the gun. The unit I’m testing is 8-1/4 inches long; and, yes, Lloyd, I checked that it indeed is a .22 caliber before mounting it. However, when the silencer is on, the top end cap does not fit.

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.22-caliber Lightweight Disco Double: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Disco Double new stock
The Lightweight Disco Double in its new stock looks striking!

Okay, all joking aside — today, we’ll look at the performance of the Lightweight Double Disco that Lloyd Sikes built. Lloyd tested this exact rifle when it was still in its factory original condition, so we can compare that to the performance of the rifle after the conversion. I was pleased to see that my chronograph results and Lloyd’s are very close.

Before the conversion, the stock Benjamin Discovery accepted a fill to 2,000 psi. From that fill, the rifle got 21 shots of .22-caliber Crosman Premiers at an average 845 f.p.s., which works out to an average 22.7 foot-pounds. Lloyd did get more shots in his string, but he discounted all those that were not within 4 percent of the average velocity. That’s a subjective choice, but it’s what drives the numbers Lloyd is giving us for the factory rifle. The maximum velocity spread in this string of 21 shots was 40 f.p.s., with a low of 820 f.p.s. and a high of 860 f.p.s.

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.22-caliber Lightweight Disco Double: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Disco Double new stock
The Lightweight Disco Double in its new stock looks striking!

I’d planned to report on the velocity of the Lightweight Disco Double today and, as good fortune would have it, the new stock arrived yesterday! So, I installed it and took a photo for you to see. I think it looks fabulous!

This stock was made by Normand Morin who has a website at Discos R Us. The wood grain is a very striking brown tone that’s finished shiny. The inletting is perfect for my rifle, and it dropped in with a tight fit. I like it even better than the walnut stock the rifle was shipped with. If you want to dress up your Disco, take a look at what this man can do for you.

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.22-caliber Lightweight Disco Double: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

You tell me that you enjoy the longer reports that pick apart certain guns and analyze them in great depth. You insist that I explain the technical terms and sometimes also the terms that are specific to shooting. We have a wide spectrum of reader experience in the shooting sports on this blog; so when I write about something, I have to keep that foremost in mind. I try not to jargonize or use insider language, although I’m sure that I do from time to time.

Today we begin what will undoubtedly become a huge report. I think you will enjoy it, but I am asking for your help in managing the questions and comments that will undoubtedly result. So, sit back and pour a fresh cup of coffee or tea, for I think this trip is going to be fun for all of us!

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Can used airguns also be good ones?

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is a guest blog from reader /Dave. He’s going to tell us about his recent experience with a fine precharged pneumatic (PCP) air rifle.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email us.

Take it away, /Dave.

Most of you know me as /Dave. I used to be known here as Shooter, until someone was nice enough to recommend the movie of the same name to me. I immediately changed to /Dave because I’m simply not, and never will be, in that league. Please excuse the pictures, they are from my phone.

I have known a lot of people in my life who absolutely must have new when it comes to buying anything. Guns, cars, bicycles…doesn’t matter — anything, really. As if used is somehow not as good, is damaged or is missing the right aura. To them, if it’s not new, it just isn’t right. For those people, I write the following report; as proof that used things are not all bad. This is one of my better experiences with used stuff.

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