Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

This report covers:

  • Air Arms domes
  • A different rest
  • The artillery hold
  • Screamer!
  • Another pellet
  • Final group — confirmation
  • Summary

In the last report I cleaned the barrel of the Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle and showed you there are no real baffles to worry about. Today I want to test the rifle to see whether cleaning has changed the accuracy in any way. I also want to test the rifle resting directly on a sandbag versus using the artillery hold. I will also try some different pellets, to see if there is more potential accuracy. It should be a good test, so let’s get started.

I’m shooting 5-shot groups today because I’m still learning things about the airgun. Five-shot groups allow me to test more things. read more


Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Trigger adjustment
  • Whiskey3 4-12X44 scope
  • Today’s test
  • Velocity with the lead Crux Pb
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • How fast will she go?
  • Easy cocking!
  • Barrel loose when cocked
  • Trigger pull
  • First stage?
  • Summary

Today we will find out about the velocity of the .22-caliber Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle that I’m testing. Before we get into that, though, I have a couple things to address.

Trigger adjustment

First, reader Siraniko asked this:

“You will have to show us a picture how the trigger is adjusted while in the gun. The only picture I could find of how to adjust the trigger showed it while separated from the gun (https://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2018/08/my-day-at-sig-sauer-part-2/).”

That’s a good question. He asked because I showed the bent Phillips screwdriver that’s used to adjust the trigger pull weight. So let’s discuss the trigger adjustments now. read more


My day at Sig Sauer: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

ASP20
Sig Sauer’s new ASP20 gas spring breakbarrel air rifle breaks ground in many areas!

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Why a gas spring?
  • Trigger
  • Why a breakbarrel?
  • Does the ASP20 have an internal shock absorber?
  • On with the build
  • Final assembly — the stock
  • The barrel
  • Off to the range
  • Shooting sensation
  • Cocking effort
  • Accuracy
  • Whisky 3 ASP 4-12X44 scope
  • Summary

Boy, is there a LOT of interest in this new rifle! You guys are asking a lot of very good questions about the new ASP20 breakbarrel rifle, as you should. I will begin by addressing some of the most prominent ones.

Why a gas spring?

Some call it a gas piston, others say gas ram, but we are all referring to the gas spring (the industry term for a spring that uses compressed gas in place of a coiled steel spring to do its job). Gas springs replace coiled steel mainsprings in spring-piston airguns. They are more modern and easier to make and obtain, they don’t take a set if left compressed, they are less susceptible to cold and, if the design is right, they are smoother operating. They also eliminate several parts that rattle and they remove some weight from the powerplant. read more


Sheridan Supergrade: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
My new Sheridan Supergrade is in fantastic condition, despite the wood check at the butt.

Sheridan Supergrade left
The cheekpiece makes the Supergrade stand out!

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Adjustable trigger!
  • Trigger-pull
  • Courage arrives!
  • Safety
  • Adjust the bolt handle position
  • Velocity
  • Test 1.
  • Test 2.
  • Test 3.
  • Pump effort
  • Summary

We’re back at it with the Sheridan Supergrade today. I will get to the velocity testing, but there are still a couple more surprises before that.

Adjustable trigger!

That’s right; the Sheridan Supergrade came with an adjustable trigger! Imagine that — an airgun from the 1940s with a trigger that adjusts.

The trigger adjusted in a unique way — by changing the location of the sear spring on a notched bar. To do this the rifle has to be out of the stock, which is not as straightforward as it is with some guns, so I won’t do it today. But I may work up the courage to try it at some point in our test. read more


Revitalizing a Benjamin 392: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin 392
Benjamin 392 multi-pump pneumatic.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Crosman Premiers
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavys
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Well?
  • JSB second test
  • Evaluation
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Benjamin 392 that’s been rebuilt. What you are about to see is stunning! This report will blow your minds!

The test

I looked at the results of the Part 2 velocity test and determined that 4 pumps would be a good number for all pellets. Since this is a multi-pump where each shot takes more time, I decided to shoot 5-shot groups, to see whether one pellet is more accurate that the rest. If I found one, I would then shoot 10 shots with that one at a fresh target. That led to an extremely rare occurrence that’s going to surprise most of you. read more


Revitalizing a Benjamin 392: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman R9

Part 1

Benjamin 392
Benjamin 392 multi-pump pneumatic.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The rebuild
  • The test
  • Test 1
  • Analysis of test 1
  • Test 2
  • Analysis of test 2
  • Test 3
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Analysis of test 3
  • Next

Today we look at the Benjamin 392 that has been resealed. The first report was done on the gun as it came from the pawn shop. All I did was oil the pump head with ATF Sealant and then test the gun. It’s been a long time since Part 1, so you may want to read it again. In the last test I said this was the fastest 392 I have ever tested.

The rifle responded well to ATF Sealant. I will run those number with today’s test figures for comparison.

The rebuild

I sent the gun to reader Jeff Cloud for a rebuild. He is the guy who rebuilt my Sheridan Blue Streak a couple years ago. read more


Gamo’s Urban precharged air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Gamo Urban
Gamo Urban.

This report covers:

  • Scoped
  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Air Arms Diabolo Field
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Other pellets
  • Experience
  • What next?
  • Summary

Today we start our look at the accuracy of Gamo’s Urban PCP. Fasten your seatbelts, guys, because today will be a bumpy ride!

Scoped

I mounted a 4-16X50 Leapers scope that is obsolete, and is unlike any scope they make today. But 4-16 power is the key.

Knowing the Urban’s performance curve, I filled to 3000 psi and shot 20 shots before refilling. There are 25 available at this pressure, but I was shooting 10-shot groups, so 20 was the limit.

The test

I shot the Urban off a sandbag rest with the rear of the butt rested for extra stability. The range was 25 yards.

Sight-in

The first shot hit the target from 12 feet about 1.5 inches below the aim point, and centered on the target, so I moved back to 25 yards and resumed sight-in. In 5 shots the rifle was zeroed, and I sighted the first pellet a little high to preserve my aim point. read more