Air Arms Pro-Sport: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Pro-Sport
Air Arms Pro-Sport.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

This report covers:

  • Evil BB!
  • Report on the Meopta scope
  • Sight-in
  • The test
  • Refine the sight-in
  • However
  • Hurray!
  • What have we learned?
  • The second However
  • H&N Baracuda with 5.50mm head
  • Next
  • Summary

Today we test the Air Arms Pro-Sport with the Vortek PG3 tune kit I installed and tested in Part 5. But first I have to clear up a misconception.

Evil BB!

Somewhere along the line you may have read that I said the Meopta MeoPro Optika6 scope came without scope caps. It wasn’t really me who said that! It was my evil twin cousin, BB Airgundart! He sometimes sneaks into my house and messes with the blog without me knowing it. The Optika6 has a very nice set of scope caps with their logo on both caps. I found them on my somewhat cluttered desk, in the detritus just above the Cambrian layer! read more


Air Arms Pro-Sport: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Pro-Sport
Air Arms Pro-Sport.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The plan
  • Setup
  • BB’s quick tip
  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Beeman Devastator
  • JSB Hades
  • H&N Baracuda with 5.50mm heads
  • The million-dollar group
  • Summary

To my US readers around the world — Happy Thanksgiving!

Today I shoot the first accuracy test with the Air Arms Pro-Sport. It’s the first of many because of all that I have planned for this rifle

The plan

After this accuracy test, that I will explain in a moment isn’t a real accuracy test, I plan to tear the Pro-Sport down and tune it for ultimate smoothness. If I can get it up to 12 foot pounds that will be fine, but a smooth-shooting rifle that is light to cock is all I’m after. The energy is a bonus. I’m also going to devote a report telling you how to adjust the trigger. This Air Arms trigger can be adjusted beyond a regular Rekord for lightness and crispness. read more


Hatsan SpeedFire Vortex multi-shot breakbarrel air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Hatsan Speedfire
Hatsan SpeedFire Vortex breakbarrel repeater.

This report covers:

  • Oops!
  • 10-shot magazine
  • The test
  • Hatsan Vortex Supreme
  • Rest on bag
  • Off hand under the cocking slot
  • Sig Wraith Pb
  • JSB Hades
  • H&N Baracuda Match 5.53mm heads
  • Ten Baracuda Match
  • Summary

Oops!

Here is a report that has been languishing since the end of March. The report on the Hatsan Speedfire Vortex multi-shot rifle got out of sync because I returned it to Hatsan after the velocity test. It turned out the rifle was functioning fine, but we discovered it doesn’t like pellets with thin skirts.

On Monday I received a comment from new reader, Polank, who had bought one of these rifles and asked where the accuracy test was. Fortunately I still had the rifle on hand, so I shuffled the schedule to run this first accuracy test today. I had to read the back reports again to learn how the rifle behaves. read more


The Beeman R10/HW 85: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 85
Weihrauch HW 85.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Beeman Kodiaks
  • Eye not up to par
  • RWS Superdome
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Crosman Premiers
  • 25 yards
  • Summary

The test

Today is our first day of accuracy testing the HW85 and I’m going to do something different. I will start at 10 meters, using the open sights that came on the rifle I’m testing. But I will only shoot 5-shot groups. I’m not interested in the absolute accuracy at 10 meters because this rifle can shoot farther than that. Ten meters is too close to accuracy test a rifle like this and expect any degree of confidence, and today you will see why.

Naturally I’m shooting with the rifle rested on a sandbag. I’m using the artillery hold, because even though the rifle is super smooth, it still recoils forward a lot. I held my off hand forward, under the rear of the cocking slot. read more


AirForce International Orion PCP air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

AirForce International Orion
The Orion PCP repeater from AirForce International.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Where to start
  • Magazine height
  • Load the mag
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Firing behavior and sound
  • We learn more
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Loading
  • Trigger pull
  • Power adjustability
  • Discussion

Where to start

Today we test the velocity of the AirForce International Orion. Many of you are new to precharged pneumatics (PCP), so let me show you how I select which pellets to test when I don’t know the airgun. I start by looking at the advertised velocity, which for this rifle in .22 caliber is said to be around 800 f.p.s. Knowing how AirForce states things like this, that number is obtained with a reasonable lead pellet, so I will guess it was a Hobby, though they might have shot something heavier. Still my velocities are going to be between 700 and 800 f.p.s. and that tells me I should start with medium weight lead pellets — something in the 13 to 16-grain range. Once we know more we can go from there. read more


Benjamin Maximus: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • Texas Airgun Show
  • Pyramyd Air Cup
  • Am I done?
  • My thoughts
  • Readers’ thoughts
  • Crosman Premier Copper Magnum
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm head
  • Does sorting help?
  • RWS Superdomes
  • JSB Exact 8.44-grain pellets
  • The trigger
  • Evaluation so far

Texas Airgun Show

The Texas Airgun Show is fast approaching! It’s held on Saturday, August 27 and opens to the public ($5 admission) at 9 a.m. Dealers and early buyers (cost for early buyers is one table — $30) can get in to set up at 6:30. Bring eye protection if you have it, because you have to wear it all the time you are outdoors. The hall is next to the skeet ranges and shot sometimes falls (like rain, with very little velocity) where people are.

AirForce Airguns has donated a Texan big bore in the winner’s choice of .35 or .45 caliber for the door prize, so anyone who buys an admission ticket is entered for the drawing. Airgun Depot is sponsoring the show and has donated one of their .40-caliber Badgers rifles for the raffle. Hatsan donated a Bull Boss PCP, Umarex USA donated a .22-caliber Octane, a $100 gift certificate, an S&W MP40 blowback pistol and 6 hats, Pyramyd Air donated a Benjamin Maximus rifle and a Zombie Slayer Paper Shooter, and American Airgunner donated 6 hats. Buy lots of raffle tickets and increase your odds at all these prizes that will be raffled from 10:30 until 1: 30. read more


Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

Crosman 101
Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Baseline test
  • Hard to cock!
  • Consistency
  • RWS Hobbys
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Baracuda Match — 5.53mm heads
  • Trigger pull
  • Barrel problems?
  • Perspective

Today we look at the power my old Crosman 101 multi-pump produces. I haven’t tested it in years, so this will be as fresh to me as it is to all of you. Let’s get to it.

Baseline test

First I want to establish the velocity with differing numbers of pump strokes. Here goes. I will use the 14.3-grain Crosman Premier pellet for this.

Strokes………………..Velocity (f.p.s.)……………..Increase
2…………………………….350………………………………–
3…………………………….437………………………………87
4…………………………….496………………………………59
5…………………………….542………………………………46
6…………………………….578………………………………36
7…………………………….612………………………………34
8…………………………….635 no air remaining………….23
9…………………………….667 no air remaining………….32
10…………………………..687 no air remaining…………..20 read more