Webley Mark II Service: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The problem
  • Trim the seal
  • Shim the old seal
  • Hole punch
  • Refit the old seal and shim
  • Does it work?

It’s been a while since we looked at the Mark II Service air rifle, asnd I thought it was time to take another look. You will recall in Part 2 I tested the velocity and found the rifle was shooting very slow. There was also a large puff of air at the breech that told me the breech seal needed to be replaced. I ordered one from the UK that took 3 weeks to arrive. When it got here I discovered it had to be sized to fit the breech. That has been shoving the report to the back burner, week after week, until I decided to do something about it.

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Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • My gun
  • Today’s test
  • BB gun powerplant
  • Secrets of the BB gun powerplant
  • Daisy BBs
  • Cocking
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Feeding
  • H&N Smart Shot BBs
  • So far

As I told you in Part 1, I’m reviewing the Daisy Red Ryder because it’s a classic BB gun, and also because I have a scope mount to test when this basic review is over. Today we look at the velocity.

My gun

My gun is either a variant 5 or 6, but I can find nothing in the Blue Book that distinguishes between those two variants. My gun has a wood buttstock with the Red Ryder brand on the left side, and a plastic forearm. The rear sight is fixed. The cocking lever is curved aluminum and painted black. The rest of the gun is blued steel. Variant 5 has all those features and was made in 1947 to 1952. Variant 6 has the same features and was made in 1952. In 1953 Daisy started painting the metal and sometime around then they also started to make the buttstocks of plastic — which is variant 7.

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Benjamin Maximus: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Maximus
The Benjamin Maximus.

This report covers:

  • 2000 psi fill
  • First test — Premier 7.9
  • Test 2 — Premier 10.6 Copper Magnum
  • Test 3 — H&N Sniper Magnum
  • Test 4 — RWS Hobby
  • Cocking
  • Trigger pull
  • Overall evaluation

Today we look at the velocity of the new Benjamin Maximus PCP. I know I’m excited!

2000 psi fill

Like the Benjamin Discovery, the Maximus is filled to only 2000 psi, which means is it easier on air in all ways. It’s easier to fill with a hand pump, it takes less air from a scuba tank or other high-pressure air vessel and it allows you to continue to get full fills when your tank is below 3000 psi. Yet it gets the same velocity as other precharged airguns that are filled to 3000 psi and higher. It just makes everything easier for the shooter.

First test — Premier 7.9

First I filled the rifle and tested it for both velocity and shot count. I tested the Benjamin Discovery in January of 2008, and the .177 prototype peaked at 953 f.p.s. with 7.9-grain Crosman Premiers. That was the same pellet I used to start this test.

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Hatsan Gladius .177 long: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Hatsan Gladius
Hatsan Gladius Long.

This report covers:

  • Quiet
  • A couple things
  • High Power
  • Baracuda Match 4.50mm
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Low power
  • Medium power setting 4
  • What to make of this?
  • Trigger pull
  • Accuracy
  • Evaluation

We’re back with the Hatsan Gladius .177 long today for the velocity test. Hatsan advertises that this rifle gives up to 90 shots per fill. You may get that many, but not on full power. This is a hunting rifle and you want hunting rifle accuracy. For me that means keeping all your shots inside an inch which is the size of the kill zone on the smaller game the Gladius is designed to take. Now, when you throw distance into the equation things get confused very fast, so my way to simplify things is to say that 50 yards is the distance at which I would like to see one-inch groups.

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Morini 162MI 10-meter match pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Morini 162MI pistol
Morini 162MI 10-meter match pistol.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • The trigger
  • Velocity
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol pellets
  • Test

Today we get the Morini 162MI 10-meter match pistol into action and test the velocity with a wide range of target pellets. The manual says the gun was set at the factory to shoot at between 492 and 508 f.p.s., so we shall see. Because this is an air pistol, I will mostly use the lighter pellets from each manufacturer, when there is more than one weight to choose from.

The triggers

Before we get to that, however, a reader mentioned that he wanted to examine the trigger. Here you go!

Morini 162MI pistol trigger
This is the trigger with the pistol grip removed. Yes, that plate covers the internal parts, but the schematic below should help with that.

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Dan Wesson model 715 BB revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson BB revolver
Dan Wesson nickel-plated BB revolver.

Part 1

This report covers:

    • What I think
    • Speedloader
    • Installing the CO2 cartridge
    • The test
    • ASG Blaster BBs
    • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
    • H&N Smart Shot copper-coated lead BBs
    • Shot count

    Trigger pull

    Today we look at velocity for the Dan Wesson model 715 nickel-plated BB revolver. As fate would have it, I had dinner in Las Vegas with the staff of Action Sport Games where I had the pleasure of meeting and speaking with their CEO, Johnny Pederson. Mr. Pederson is an engineer, and when the discussion turned to the Dan Wesson model 715, he became very interested in what I thought.

    What I think

    I told him the pellet revolver had tested quite well when I recently shot it. See my 3-part report on that revolver. And that is significant, because that revolver is priced at more than a hundred dollars less than the other pellet revolver of the same accuracy — the Smith & Wesson 586. Both pellet guns offer realistic weight, adjustable sights and good triggers. So for once there is a real choice available to airgunners. I think he was surprised to hear me say that. Surprised but pleased, because his company invested a lot of time and effort on that airgun.

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Hand pumps for the ancient big bores: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • How powerful were antique big bores?
  • How were they filled?
  • No one knew
  • Hand pumps of antiquity
  • Empirical testing
  • Early rapper
  • Single-stage pump tradeoff
  • But wait — there’s more!
  • Summary

Dennis Quackenbush has always been helpful when it comes to the difficult questions about airguns. Over the years, he and I have experimented with several fundamental questions; the most recent being the $100 PCP. I should have an update on that one for you in a couple weeks.

How powerful were antique big bores?

Back in the 1990s — the days when I was still writing The Airgun Letter and Airgun Revue magazine — I had a prolonged discussion with Dennis about the performance of big bore airguns of antiquity. He had just come out with the .375-caliber Brigand that was about to start the airgun world on its modern journey toward big bores, and there was a lot of interest in them.

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