Sig Sauer Max Michel 1911 blowback BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig Sauer Max Michel BB pistol
Max Michel 1911 BB pistol from Sig Sauer.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Loading the CO2 cartridge
  • Daisy BBs
  • Sig BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Sig CO2 cartridge
  • Blowback is heavy
  • Trigger pull
  • Overall evaluation

Today we look at the velocity of the Sig Sauer Max Michel 1911 blowback BB pistol. Let’s get right to it.

Loading the CO2 cartridge

The CO2 cartridge loads differently than any I have encountered. Remove the left grip panel and pull up on bottom of the flat mainspring housing to unlatch, then swing the housing out of the grip and down under the grip. Now the large end of the cartridge must be inserted into the grip first. There are two flanges at the bottom of the hole in the grip that are too small for the cartridge to pas through, so the large end has to be inserted above them and then dropped inside the grip. That’s the first departure from the norm, but there is one more.

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Generation 2 .25 caliber Benjamin Marauder: Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Marauder synthetic stock
Second-generation Benjamin Marauder in a synthetic stock.

UTG Bubble Leveler scope: Part 1
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8

This report covers:

  • What this is
  • Bubble Leveler scope
  • Today
  • Some variables
  • JSB Exact Kings
  • The bottom line
  • Trigger blade broke
  • How do you contact him?

Today I start another look at the .25-caliber gen 2 Benjamin Marauder. When I attended the Pyramyd Air Cup in September, I met Tom Himes. He showed me a Benjamin Marauder he tuned and asked me to cock the bolt. Every Marauder owner knows their bolts are stiff and sticky. But this one wasn’t. It was light and smooth.

What this is

Tom tunes Marauders for their optimum shot count on a fill. He also adjusts and lubricates their triggers for optimum let-off. And he has a number of other tricks and tips that he passes on to his customers. When he told me that he could tune my .25 caliber rifle to get roughly 30 shots at 806 f.p.s. with JSB Exact Kings, I was intrigued. If you have followed this series you know that the best I’ve been able to do is 16 shots per fill.

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Mauser 300SL target rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Mauser 300SL
Mauser 300SL. There are three finger scallops along the cocking lever.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Velocity
  • Hobby
  • Disassembly
  • Tuning tip
  • Build quality
  • It worked!
  • Oil the piston seal
  • Velocity after lubrication
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Sig Sauer Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Trigger
  • Impressions

I’m diving right into the Mauser 300SL. Today will be velocity day, plus I will try to treat the mainspring(s) with Tune in a Tube. Lots to do, so let’s get started.

Velocity

If I don’t test the velocity of the rifle before trying to tune it I know many readers will be upset, but I’m only going to test a single pellet. That will give us a before/after comparison with Tune in a Tube. However, the way this rifle vibrates, there is no way I’m not going to try to calm it down. It’s supposed to be a target rifle anyway, so raw velocity is not important.

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Sheridan Supergrade: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade
Sheridan model A, also called the Supergrade.

Sheridan Supergrade: Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Test 1
  • Unscheduled test
  • Test 2
  • Test 4
  • Pump effort
  • Accuracy next

I was able to borrow a Supergrade Sheridan for today’s test. Since we all compare this rifle to the Blue Streak anyway, I decided to run the same test that I did for my recently rebuilt Sheridan Blue Streak.

This rifle was made in 1948 and as far as we can tell, it has never been rebuilt. When the owner received it, the valve wasn’t operating correctly. So he opened up the rifle and cleaned all the parts he could see. The valve was not disassembled. He also lubricated the gun, and it started shooting for him.

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Air Venturi Air Bolt: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi Air Bolts
Air Venturi Air Bolts turn a .50 caliber big bore rifle or shotgun into an air bow.

This report covers:

  • Like no other!
  • Another air bow?
  • Is the Air Bolt any good?
  • What I was told
  • We begin
  • Muzzle-loaded
  • Shot 1
  • 30 yards
  • Great air conservation
  • Evaluation

Today I start looking at the Air Bolt from Air Venturi. This product is a package of 6 arrows that sell for $120.00 at Pyramyd Air, and I know there will be lectures on the cost of crossbow arrows today. Because that’s what the Air Bolt is — a crossbow bolt.

Like no other!

HOWEVER — and this is the news today — with the Air Bolt, you don’t have to buy another gun. If you already own a .50 caliber big bore airgun — and hundreds, if not thousands of serious U.S. airgunners already do — there is nothing more to buy. You have everything you need to begun shooting.

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Webley Mark II Service: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The problem
  • Trim the seal
  • Shim the old seal
  • Hole punch
  • Refit the old seal and shim
  • Does it work?

It’s been a while since we looked at the Mark II Service air rifle, asnd I thought it was time to take another look. You will recall in Part 2 I tested the velocity and found the rifle was shooting very slow. There was also a large puff of air at the breech that told me the breech seal needed to be replaced. I ordered one from the UK that took 3 weeks to arrive. When it got here I discovered it had to be sized to fit the breech. That has been shoving the report to the back burner, week after week, until I decided to do something about it.

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Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • My gun
  • Today’s test
  • BB gun powerplant
  • Secrets of the BB gun powerplant
  • Daisy BBs
  • Cocking
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Feeding
  • H&N Smart Shot BBs
  • So far

As I told you in Part 1, I’m reviewing the Daisy Red Ryder because it’s a classic BB gun, and also because I have a scope mount to test when this basic review is over. Today we look at the velocity.

My gun

My gun is either a variant 5 or 6, but I can find nothing in the Blue Book that distinguishes between those two variants. My gun has a wood buttstock with the Red Ryder brand on the left side, and a plastic forearm. The rear sight is fixed. The cocking lever is curved aluminum and painted black. The rest of the gun is blued steel. Variant 5 has all those features and was made in 1947 to 1952. Variant 6 has the same features and was made in 1952. In 1953 Daisy started painting the metal and sometime around then they also started to make the buttstocks of plastic — which is variant 7.

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