Beeman R8: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor R8

The Beeman R8 looks like a baby R1.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • RWS Hobby
  • Shot cycle
  • RWS Superdome
  • Trigger pull
  • JSB Exact RS
  • How does this rifle compare?
  • Cocking effort
  • Next

Well, to say there is a lot of interest in the Beeman R8 would be an understatement! Just as I got a huge interest at the Findlay airgun show where I bought it, this blog has also revealed many shooters who are interested in both the R8 and in the current HW50S that I will now have to test for you. [Update on that. my friend, Mac, did test an HW50S back in 2010.]

I was very excited to test this rifle because it’s one of the smoothest breakbarrels I have every shot. That list includes my Tyrolean R8 and the RWS Diana 45 I tuned for Johnny Hill. Let’s get right to the test.

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Benjamin Wildfire PCP repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Wildfire
Benjamin Wildfire.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • First test
  • Loading the clip
  • Air management
  • String two
  • Is this okay?
  • String three
  • Refilling the rifle after 36 shots
  • What’s the verdict?
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Lead-free lightweight pellets
  • Discharge sound
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation so far

Today we go right into shooting the Benjamin Wildfire for velocity. I’m excited, so let’s begin.

First test

I know there are many things people want to know about the Wildfire, so I am going to test it a little differently. You will still get the same results I always give, but I will add a few extra things I don’t usually do. The incredible interest in this gun justifies this special approach. We will begin with Crosman Premier lite pellets.

I filled the rifle to 2000 psi and began shooting. Since the clip holds 12 pellets I tested it with strings of 12 shots instead of 10. I will give you the standard data in a moment, but I first want to show you the velocity of each shot.

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Diana 240 Classic:Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 240 Classic
Diana 240 Classic.


Part 1

This report covers:

  • BB’s eye
  • You liked it
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Hobby
  • Crosman Premier lite
  • The trigger
  • Trigger
  • Cocking effort
  • Evaluation so far

BB’s eye

Just an update on my eye that had the cataract removed. It is now more acute at distance than the other eye. I see the doctor who did the surgery this Friday and am expecting that she will pronounce it fixed. I can now aim with open sights once more. Now, on to today’s report.

You liked it

Just an observation from the comments to Part 1 of this report. Many of you like this Diana 240 Classic air rifle for the same reasons I do. You like the small size, easy cocking and the general classic styling. Today we begin discovering how it performs, and I have to admit that I have high hopes. There aren’t enough airguns like this one in the market anymore, and I think that’s a shame. Because this is where the heart of airgunning lies — not in .22 rimfire power and accuracy, but with guns that are fun and easy to shoot.

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Dan Wesson M512 4-inch pellet revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson pellet revolver
New 4-inch Dan Wesson pellet revolver from ASG is very realistic!

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Loading the CO2
  • Loading the cartridges
  • The tests
  • RWS Basic
  • Crosman Premier lite
  • Qiang Yuan training pellets
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Analysis
  • 2017 Pyramyd Air Cup
  • 2017 Texas Airgun Show

Today I test the velocity of the Dan Wesson 4-inch pellet revolver. This should be an interesting test.

Loading the CO2

I installed a fresh CO2 cartridge in the grip, after putting a couple drops of Crosman Pellgunoil on the tip of the cartridge before piercing. The oil gets blown into the valve and coats every seal inside, ensuring the gun remains gas-tight.

Loading the cartridges

The cartridges load from the rear, which is easy to do. The pellets slip into the plastic liners of each cartridge easily and stay there securely until the gas blows they into the barrel.
The loaded cartridges also load easily into the cylinder. When you’re done shooting, all you have to do is open the cylinder and tip the muzzle up and the cartridges fall right out. There is no expansion from gas the way there is with a firearm cartridge.

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Why own a chronograph?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • No preaching
  • Evaluate an old airgun
  • Test pellets
  • Evaluate a tuneup
  • For detailed tuning and product development
  • What it isn’t

Today is my cataract surgery. I don’t know how well I will be able to function online for the next several days, so will you veteran readers please help the new guys? I know you always do, but I’m just telling you what’s happening.

If you have read this blog for very long you can answer the title question for yourself, because I write about chronographs all the time. I use them for big things like testing the health of a new acquisition (the Sharp Ace Target and the Sheridan Supergrade), and things more subtle (testing the Air Arms Galahad).

No preaching

I used to preach about when to use a chrono and when not to, but I’m not going to do that today. Use it whenever you like and for whatever reason suits you.

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They have the wrong twist rate!: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Then came big bores
  • What am I talking about?
  • Bullets don’t work like pellets
  • Bullet length
  • Why bullet diameters matter
  • Hard cast lead bullets
  • Putting all of this together
  • Last story

Before we begin I have some startling news from Umarex USA. Sales manager, Justin Biddle contacted me and told me the new Hammer big bore is regulated.! I certainly did not know that, because this is huge news. It means that those three shots it gets on a fill can all be at the same power level. I have adjusted the SHOT Show report (Part 6) to reflect this new information. And by a strange coincidence, this dovetails nicely with today’s report.

For many years I have written about black powder firearms in this blog, and I have included things like rifling twist rates in those articles. And for years people have written me comments that they appreciate a look at something different, but they would never consider shooting black powder arms or even modern firearms, themselves.

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Methods of power adjustment — pneumatics: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Pneumatics
  • Single stroke pneumatics
  • Multi-pump pneumatics
  • Precharged pneumatics
  • Short history of PCPs
  • Barrel length
  • Projectile weight
  • Barrel length and projectile weight together
  • Airflow
  • Springs
  • Valve stem travel
  • Valve angle and contact area
  • What’s the ideal?

This is the second part of a report on the methods of adjusting power in an airgun. Reader Riki asked for the report, and a number of other readers seconded his request. I wasn’t planning to also delve into CO2 guns, but several readers asked for that, and I will get to that in a different report. Today we look at pneumatics.

Pneumatics

A pneumatic airgun is one that uses compressed air to power the pellet. While a spring gun also uses compressed air, it is the method of compression that sets it apart from the pneumatics. In spring guns, a piston moves to compress the air at the instant of firing, where in pneumatics, the air is stored inside in a compressed state, waiting for the trigger to release some or all of it.

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