AirForce Escape: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

AirForce Escape rifle
The AirForce Airguns Escape precharged pneumatic air rifle is a powerful new survival rifle in both .22 and .25 calibers.

Last time we looked at the accuracy of the AirForce Escape at 50 yards. I shot the rifle on low pressure and a low power setting on that day to see what it could do. You may remember that at 50 yards, I got a best 5-shot group with JSB Exact King pellets that measured 0.594 inches between centers. That’s great for a .25-caliber PCP, but I know it left some of you wondering what the rifle can do at its maximum power. Today, we’ll look at that.

The heaviest .25-caliber pellet I have is the Eun Jin pointed pellet, which weighs 43.2 grains. So, it’s a little heavier than the standard bullet of a .22 Long Rifle cartridge. We know from testing that this pellet leaves the muzzle at up to 1010 f.p.s., generating 97.88 foot-pounds of energy.

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Benjamin Marauder PCP .177-caliber air rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Secrets of loading the Benjamin Marauder magazine
Part 3
Part 4

Benjamin Marauder
Benjamin Marauder

Before I begin today’s report, I have some news about Leapers’ scopes for blog reader Kevin. He wondered what the status was on the new Bug Buster scopes with the thinner reticle lines, so I asked Leapers for an update on that plus a couple other scopes that will be coming out soon. The new Bug Buster is apparently coming to market very soon. It’s impossible to say for sure exactly when, but the next 60 days sounds about right. Leapers will be sending me a sample to test for you, so I’ll do a report on it. But I also learned that they have several full-sized scopes that have parallax correction down to 5 yards. That’s almost in the Bug Buster range. They’re sending me some samples right now, and I’ll report on them for you.

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Benjamin Marauder PCP .177-caliber air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Secrets of loading the Benjamin Marauder magazine

Benjamin Marauder
Benjamin Marauder

Today, we’ll start learning how to tune the .177 Benjamin Marauder we’re testing. An owner can do two things to his rifle. He can adjust the power (which is the velocity) and he can adjust the maximum fill pressure the reservoir will accept. The power adjustment is straightforward, and I’ll get to it in a moment. The fill pressure is more obscure. Unless you have a good reason to adjust the maximum fill pressure, you should leave it set to 3,000 psi because that will give the greatest number of shots. I’ll adjust the fill pressure in a future report. Right now, we’re looking at just velocity.

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Benjamin Trail NP pistol: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4a
Part 4b
Part 5

Benjamin Trail NP pistol
Benjamin’s new Trail NP breakbarrel pellet pistol, with cocking aid removed.

We’re certainly getting a good look at the Benjamin Trail NP pistol! While the title says this is Part 6, it’s actually the 7th report because Part 4 was so large it had to be broken into two parts.

Let’s look at the performance of the pistol after break-in. This test pistol has been shot so much that it’s now broken in, so today we’ll look at the velocity. Crosman says in the owner’s manual that the pistol needs several hundred shots before it’s fully broken-in, and this gun certainly has that many shots through it.

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How chronographs changed airgunning–and not always for the best!

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

This topic was suggested by veteran blog reader Kevin. I liked it because it gives me a chance to say some things to the new airgunners; better yet, it’s a great way to start a discussion among all you readers.

I will touch on the things about chronographs, which are near and dear to me, but I think my role today is simply to get the ball rolling. We have enough readers with chronograph experience that I’m sure they’ll share a lot of their own viewpoints — some of which may never have occurred to me.

What is a chronograph?
The term chronograph means different things to different people. To an horologist, it might mean a particularly accurate instrument (watch or clock) to record the passage of time; but to a shooter, it means an instrument that’s used to measure the velocity of a projectile. It still records the passage of time, but also performs an additional calculation to convert the results into velocity. As incredible as it sounds, we’re able to measure the speed of a pellet or bullet moving hundreds, or even thousands of feet per second with an instrument we can buy for as little as a hundred dollars.

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What do advertised airgun velocity numbers mean?

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Yesterday, I told blog reader Victor that this report was for him, but I think it’s for a lot of folks who are relatively new to this blog. Here’s the premise of the report: Airguns are usually advertised with their expected top velocities. What do those numbers represent? Today, I’ll attempt to explain this as clearly as I can.

The numbers are just lies!
Let’s get this one out of the way first because it seems to be the prevailing belief that advertised velocities are nothing but lies put forth by marketing departments to sell more guns. There’s some truth to this belief, but it isn’t 100 percent by any means. Here’s what’s going on with the lies.

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Favorites

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

The reaction to the accuracy test with the Cometa Fusion Premier Star air rifle brought a lot of feelings to the surface. Those feelings impressed me to the point of writing this report.

I don’t like all airguns equally. And there are some airguns that I really don’t care for at all. But I can’t overlook any of them because someone does care. Someone does like exactly the gun I don’t like, and to them that gun is a delight in many ways. So, regardless of how I feel, I try to put my feelings aside when I look at an airgun for the first time.

Let me get specific without naming any names. Some of you dislike spring guns. You find them difficult to shoot and not as accurate as you would like.

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