Sig Sauer X-Five pellet pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Sig P226 X-Five
Sig’s X-Five pellet pistol.

This report covers:

  • X-Five P320 or P226?
  • Velocity — RWS Hobby
  • Velocity — SIG Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Velocity — JSB Exact RS
  • Will the X-Five shoot BBs?
  • Velocity — Dust Devils
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation

Today we look at the velocity of the new Sig Sauer X-Five pellet pistol. I told you in Part 1 that the firearm version of this airgun is now on my bucket list. Here is why. The X-series Sig pistols have all been through Sig’s Custom Shop, where their triggers have been tuned to perfection and where their parts have been hand-fitted to achieve accuracy that was once just the claim of the legendary Sig P210.

Most readers know that I am a handgunner at heart. I grew up longing for the most accurate handguns available, and all my life the Sig P210 has been one of them. It rivals S&W and Colt revolvers and accurized 1911s. And they cost accordingly. The Sig X-Five will cost just under $1,700. That’s not cheap by any means, but compared to what a vintage P210 costs, it’s very reasonable.

X-Five P320 or P226?

In Part One I guessed the X-Five pellet pistol I am testing is a takeoff of Sig’s P226 X-Five. I guessed that because there is also a P320 X-Five. You see, the X-Five denotes a trip through the Custom Shop to have all those nice things done. It is not a model of its own — at least not in the Sig firearm line. But in the pellet pistols the X-Five is a standalone model.

So, X-Five, by itself, is correct terminology for the pellet pistol. However, I contacted Sig and was informed by Dani Navickas, Sig’s Airgun Product Manager, that the pellet pistol is indeed a copy of the German P226 X-Five. Here in the U.S. the P320 X-Five will be the pistol that’s seen, which is appropriate because our military and many U.S. law enforcement agencies around the nation are adopting the P320 as their primary carry arm.

Velocity — RWS Hobby

The first pellet tested was the RWS Hobby. It’s a light lead wadcutter that is often quite accurate. In the X-Five Hobbys averaged 340 f.p.s. The spread went from a low of 323 f.p.s. to a high of 359 f.p.s., which is 36 f.p.s. I did wait 10 seconds between shots, but to be fair, the fastest shot of 359 f.p.s. came immediately after a 5-minute phone call. The next-fastest shot was the first one, at 351 f.p.s.

Velocity — SIG Match Ballistic Alloy

Next up was the lead free SIG Match Ballistic Alloy pellet. These are also very accurate and in the X-Five they averaged 411 f.p.s. The low was 398 and the high was 423 f.p.s. So the range was 25 f.p.s. for 10 shots.

Velocity — JSB Exact RS

Next I tried JSB Exact RS. They averaged 326 f.p.s. with a spread from 316 to 341 f.p.s. That’s 25 f.p.s.

Will the X-Five shoot BBs?

Reader GunFun1 asked whether the X-Five will shoot BBs. So I asked Sig and was told that it wasn’t designed to, but the magazine does have a magnet, and BBs will work. So I tested Air Venturi Dust Devils next.

Velocity — Dust Devils

Dust Devils averaged 401 f.p.s. The spread went from a low of 374 to a high of 419 f.p.s. That’s a range of 45 f.p.s. So, they work, but it wasn’t planned.

Shot count

I had installed a fresh CO2 cartridge in Part 1 and fired it maybe 5 times to assess the blowback. Then I fired the 40 shots in this test. After I ran out of ammo on the BB test, I fired quickly 10 more times before the hammer failed to cock. Then, while testing the trigger, the slide began cocking the hammer once more a few times. I’m saying you can probably get three magazines of 60 shots if you fire slow and deliberate, or two mags with some left over if you shoot rapid fire.

Trigger pull

I answered this in Part 1, but once again, pulling the trigger does advance the belt in the magazine. You can feel it as you take up the slack but it isn’t hard. This is a single action only pistol, but there is a long takeup in the trigger to advance that magazine belt. Then the trigger stops and becomes crisp, breaking at 5 lbs. 3 oz.

Sig X-Five magazine
The pellets go into the belt that then advances by pulling the trigger. I used flash for this shot and the Sig pellets reflected a lot of light, compared to the Hobbys.

Evaluation

I sure hope this pistol is accurate, because in all other ways it has a lot going for it. Sig has forced me to examine the firearm this is based on, and now I want one. Either that or I win the lottery and get a vintage P210! But they tell me you have to play it to win, and that costs too much!

52 thoughts on “Sig Sauer X-Five pellet pistol: Part 2



  1. B.B.,

    I like the design of the belt. I assume that it probably borrows from a full auto firearm? It looks like something that I would like to take apart and study. The holders look plastic while under that appears to a metal sub-chain? It reminds me of a typical bicycle chain.

    As with anything, my first thought of something is, 1) what is the weak link and 2) what will give first with a lot of use. Not a few hundred shots, but rather several thousand. I do not mean that to be just for the belt in this case, but rather the entire assy./gun. Any air gun for that matter if it is going to be shot (a lot).

    Good Day to you and to all,… Chris


  2. BB,

    So in essence, the Sig line are really revolvers rather than semis.

    The semi pellet shooter is really a tough nut to crack, most especially in the magazine category. The odd shape of the projectile and it’s softness present some real issues. I remember seeing a true semi bullpup that used small red plastic casings to hold the pellets. The magazine would hold about fifty I think. As you can well imagine finding all of those little red casings could end up being a big expense for shooting this thing. It never made it to market apparently, but I think they were on the right track.

    If the issue of using the belt as the chamber can be perfected or having the bolt extract and chamber the pellet…

    I am really looking forward to what is next.


    • RR,

      The answer might be a spherical (cylindrical?) magazine such as that used by the Daisy Powerline 2003. One had to use wadcutters for reliable feeding, and tinkerers quickly found a way to make it full auto (35 shots in about five seconds!). But it worked. And mine has never jammed. But while the magazine seems sturdy, the pistol itsdelf is made of polystyrene. I do not shoot it a lot as I consider it fragile.

      Michael


      • Michael,

        Interesting. The Hatsans and the Huben use a circular clip.

        My thoughts are more along the lines of a belt feed mechanism. The Air Ordinance SMG22 uses such, but the belt is also the chamber as in these Sigs and there is a lot of wasted gas with blow around. Perhaps a different design to the belt where it would line up and seal well with the breech and the bolt and be durable enough to withstand +3000 PSI so as to act as the chamber.

        The magazine holding the belt could possibly be similar to that of the Sig, but would likely need to be wider to accommodate a larger arc. I myself do believe it is quite doable.


        • RR,

          The word I was searching for earlier was helix. The pellets inside the magazine are spring tensioned in a spiral. The spring means the trigger doesn’t have to advance the rounds. The wide-diameter and long helix mean 35 pellets can be loaded. And finally, the blowback cocks the hammer, so it is a true semi-auto. The trigger does one thing only — release the sear.

          Michael


      • Michael,
        I was always curious about those. We they “accurate” so to speak? If I recall, didn’t Daisy have a rifle that took this same type magazine?

        Doc


        • Doc,

          The infamous rifle version, the 2001, was a dual-powered (CO2 or mulyipump) was discontinued after a wrongful death suit against Daisy.

          Back to the 2003 pistol, I’ve only plinked a few times with mine and the last time was a while ago, so I do not recall.

          However, Michael (no relation, LOL) at ReplicaAirguns posted a video showing him putting 10 shots (I counted 11 shots, but I’ll have to watch again) into a roughly 1.5 inch group at about 30 feet, so I would say not bad, not bad at all.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3Ih-93qXOA

          Michael



      • Michael,

        That is a great video link. I watch his vids all the time, but I haven’t seen that one or even heard of the gun. You need to shoot that thing! Fragile, Smagile. Are you so young that it could become collectible before you croak. I know that I never let that become a factor. I buy ’em to shoot ’em. Is it still made? I want one.

        Half


        • Halfstep,

          I understand your philosophy, but I’m old enough that if I croak, my wife should get at least 80 percent of what it should go for! ;^)

          It is fun to shoot, but no more so than some other air pistols I have. For example, my Umarex Desert Eagle is ALMOST true semi-auto. It is unlikely to become collectible and is much more stout than the Daisy 2003, to my fingers, anyway. The 2003 is easier on CO2, however. And it is more “pointable.” The Umarex D,E, is a tack driver, however.

          I have nothing against Sig, but either of the above two pistols is probably much more fun-gun than this particular pellet pistol. That said, perhaps the single best blowback air pistol I have is the BB target version of the P226 X-Five Open. At under nine yards it is more accurate than any other CO2 repeater I have, pellet or roundball. That is one BB pistol with radar. Point, shoot, hit.

          Michael


          • Michael,

            Until you mentioned it, I had forgotten that I own that X-Five Open myself. As a matter of fact, it has never been taken out of the box. I bought it and the dark earth pellet 226 at the same time and just randomly chose the pellet gun to mess with first. It is accurate but nonadjustable and doesn’t shoot to my POA. I got involved with bushing and shimming to change the POI and then got sick and ultimately had to spend some time in the hospital. By the time I got better, I guess I had forgotten the X-Five, So thanks for the reminder.

            Is your D.E. the size of the firearm or is it scaled down? I always felt that the firearm was just ridiculously large and, while it has, arguably, the highest intimidation factor of any handgun, it is practically unshootable for the average hand. Perhaps that is what you were alluding to when you referenced its “pointability”?

            Half



              • Michael,

                I’m sorry that I wasn’t clear. I was using your abbreviation for Desert Eagle. That is the gun that I was asking the size of.

                BTW, do you use an optic or Red Dot on your X-Five Open?


                • Halfstep,

                  The Umarex is indeed huge. It, too, is VERY accurate, albeit a pellet pistol, so it had better be accurate. It is a gas hog, but it is fun to shoot. I buy CO2 Powerlets by the 500 hundred, which, with a sale, makes them pretty cheap by the piece.

                  I removed the optics mount from my P226 X-Open and use the excellent adjustable rear sight instead. That’s why I bought that one instead of the one without the compensator. The deluxe target version has the target sight!

                  Michael


  3. BB,
    I am curious about the magazine belt. Could you push a pellet through the magazine and have a look at it. In the MCX the pellet comes out with four dents from the ridges that help retain the pellet. Some people have speculated that those changes to the pellet reduce accuracy.
    On a different subject, I saw a new Sig-Sauer P-210 listed at a retailer for $1400. I know that it is probably not the same as getting a vintage one. My want list includes a Sig P230 which has not been made for a few years.
    Gerald



  4. I wanted to show my revamped targets to the readers to get some preshow input. I have add guards to all the targets to greatly minimize the chance of a pellet strike on the bearing. And you can see the new freestyle spinner that gives the diy types a cheaper alternative. All this and the price is the same for the original targets. I will be sending guards to everyone who has already purchased a target. Looking forward to meeting fellow airgunners at the Midwest airgun show. http://www.midwestairgunshow.com/
    Carl



    • Carl,

      Very nice! I like the guards. Wherever did you get that idea? 😉 I wish you all of the best in strong sales and for making some good solid retail contacts.

      Just an idea, but maybe a video on a lap top or monitor screen to let people see them in action. That would be nice touch at the table.

      As much as I would love to make it, things for the weekend are not stacking up in my favor. It would an honor to meet you in person.

      Best wishes again,… Chris


      • Chris
        You have been very instrumental in this endeavor, and I greatly appreciate not only your advice, but your motivational cheerleading! And I’m sorry you won’t be making the trip I was definitely looking foward to meeting in person.
        Carl


        • Carl,

          Why,.. thank you very much for that compliment. I only wish you the very best and would wish the same for me should I ever take the leap into making something.

          I do have an idea for something that I seek, but that there appears to no market for,.. at all. Send me an E and we can discuss it. With the current trend in fat, up front tanks on PCP’s,… there might be an “unfilled niche” in the market. I do hear that can be a good thing.? 😉

          Chris

          Ya’ never know on a meet. I want to. Heck,…. I may just go for it,… but don’t hold your breath. As show’s go,… I could not ask for closer,… 1 hour-ish. For sure though,… I will get there one day.


  5. Carl,

    Your bearing guard looks like a winner! Just one very minor item. In the photograph can’t tell if they have a slight angle down to avoid bounce-back especially if someone shoots bbs at close range.

    Best wishes on strong sales,

    shootski


    • Shootski
      They pivot so they can be adjusted to the desired angle. Even without the guard a pellet strike on the bearing or base could result in a ricochet so always use caution in selecting your shooting area.
      Carl




    • Shootski
      You obviously haven’t seen my posts on the em ge, but thank you for your vote of confidence I need all I can get!! I didn’t realize how hard it can be to put yourself out there.
      Carl


      • Carl,

        It has been a while since I have commented on your spinner designs, but the amount of thought and labor you have put into them is incredible. You deserve a great deal of praise for what you’ve accomplished. Any one of your spinners is worth more than three or four mass-produced spinners I have ever seen.

        That brings me back to advice I believe I offered, uninvited, to you once before. You are onto something here. You MUST seek out a local, smart, business student, probably at a community college and through one of its Business Department faculty. Offer the star student a flat rate to put together a good, sound business plan. The student might even do it simply as a class project and not accept any $$ in payment.

        The bottom line is that you a) either sell it for major bucks up front, or b) enter into a licensing agreement with an established manufacturer (Gamo, Crosman, etc.), or c) develop a contractual agreement with a manufacturer and marketer (risky, if you ask me, but it IS your baby, and you didn’t ask me). Personally, option one or two is the way to go and to avoid being cheated.

        You have done all of the work. And it is clearly a great deal of work. Whatever money is to be made from this, you deserve a great deal of it.

        Too many superb inventors have not benefited from their work.

        PLEASE do not be among them.

        Michael


        • Michael
          Thank you for the kind words,and great advice! We’re using this show as a way to gauge the public’s appreciation of our targets and depending on the feedback and sales we get, will determine where we go with this endeavor. Either way it’s been mostly fun and a great learning experience. The support we have received here has been phenomenal and is a testament to the readership.
          Carl


  6. All,

    What are your thoughts on using BB replicas with non-reciprocating slides as training aids? I just received a notification from PA that the Umarex Glock 19 is now available, but I’m wondering how much the lack of a moving slide will impact the ability to use it as an accurate training tool.



  7. I see that PA has a sale going. I will most likely take advantage of it. A bummer,… as usual,.. is that some of the pricier stuff is excluded. Some of the scopes I was/am looking at are excluded.

    As a side note,.. I do believe that an upper level court recently ruled that states could charge sales tax for out of state sales. PA is Ohio,.. so I already deal with that by default. My newest toy however did not come from Ohio and I paid no sales tax,.. which would have a fair bit. It looks like that benefit will be ending as you know FOR SURE!!!! that states will not pass up the chance (now blessed) to take more of your hard earned money! Grrrrrrrr!!!!!!! 🙁


    • Chris U,

      In KY you have to pay sales tax on all out of state purchases at Income Tax time in April anyway, or become a criminal, if caught. Our tax is only 6% so I just do it and stay legal.

      Half




        • TT,

          One word for that,…. GRRRRRR!

          Thank you for that added,… most unwelcome,.. insight.

          While I think that I do well to keep up on news,.. I apparently missed that.

          Thank you,….. Chris


          • Chris

            I can’t imagine how much sales tax I paid over the years. Don’t want to think about it either. Must total to a massive amount of money.
            What could I have bought with that.
            Same with insurance that I never collected a penny on. I think I could buy a new Lamborghini or a Vette for every day of the week.

            tt


  8. Halfstep,

    Thank you for that added insight. I was not aware that it was in effect in some states yet at all. That may be a case a case of a state just doing it and then it is challenged and ruled upon. Not the first time we have had that play out.

    I would suppose that it is up to the seller to collect and then return the collected sales tax to the state of recipient? I do not know. That sounds like more administrative paper work for the seller if that is the case. And,… you know will be absorbing that.


    • Chris, HS and TT:

      I probably should not bring this up, but one of the two political parties supported the online sales tax initiative on its way to and in front of the Supreme Court. That party is also the one that is associated with low taxation (for the rich), the 2nd Amendment, State’s Rights, Pro-Life, and so on.

      “Open ye eyes, for thou art being deceived.”

      Michael


      • Michael,

        I was not aware of that. Nor was I aware that it was already in place in Ohio, as I previously stated.

        As for the rest,.. I could on and on,.. but will not. Either way, getting more money in the states coffers would seem to be something that both parties would agree upon, at the state level anyways.

        It will be interesting to see how the court rules. Personally, I would prefer no out of state sales tax. I do think that all involved could probably spend the money that they (already) have with less waste.

        Then again,.. I am set up/applied for for a half million grant to study the romantic life of earth worms. I am sure that no one minds me using their tax dollars on that. Right? I am all set up and everything. A new 10 gallon aquarium and some dirt. Got it set up real nice in a spare bedroom. I even have a desk, a chair and a new pencil. 😉

        …… don’t even reply to that! 🙂 Chris



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