Posts Tagged ‘JSB Match Diabolo Exact Jumbo Monster pellets’

Hatsan AT P1 PCP air pistol: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Hatsan AT-P1 air pistol
Hatsan AT P1 air pistol

It’s taken me awhile to get back to this pistol because I injured my hand, so I couldn’t fill the Hatsan AT P1 PCP air pistol from the hand pump for a couple of weeks, but last Friday I was at it again — probably for the last time. You may remember that I discovered that the AT P1 likes a fill pressure of 3,200 psi — which is sort of ironic in light of several recent reports I’ve done. This time, I used the Hill pump to fill the gun to that pressure to see if there are 10 good shots on a fill. That was the problem before — the circular clip holds 10 pellets, but the gun didn’t seem to want to shoot more than 7 of them on a single fill of air.

I decided that instead of wasting time with a lot of different pellets, I would concentrate on the one good pellet that I knew gave the best accuracy. That’s the Beeman Kodiak. First, I filled the gun to 3,200 psi, then loaded the clip and inserted it into the gun. Someone asked me how I held the gun to shoot it, given that it’s scoped with a Leapers UTG 3-9X40 AO rifle scope. The eyepiece has to be held within 2-3 inches of the eye in order to see the image. There’s a way to hold the gun that uses the scope as one of the handles, and that’s what I did. I photographed it for you, so you can see it as I describe the hold.

Hatsan AT P1 air pistol held on bag
This is how I held the pistol on the bag. My hand is holding the back of the scope and positioning it close to my sighting eye.

I hold the back of the scope at the eyepiece and let my hand separate the rear of the scope from my sighting eye by the required distance. My hand is pressed against my safety glasses to maintain the separation. The weight of the pistol rests directly on the bag, so all my other hand does is keep the pistol steady. With this hold, I can squeeze the trigger without moving the gun.

This hold is one I learned while shooting the LD Mark I pistol from Tim McMurray. That’s a Crosman Mark I Target pistol that Tim converts to add a longer bafrrel, a CO2 tank hanging down from the grip and a rifle scope mounted on top — just like this one. With the LD, I rested the external tank on my chest and held the scope like you see here. That gave me near-rifle accuracy.

The result is a steady hold — especially when you consider I’m shooting only 25 yards. I don’t recommend holding a recoiling firearm pistol this way, but you can get away with it on a PCP.

First target
All targets were shot at 25 yards. The first target looked very good until the final shot. I could see that the pistol was grouping low and to the left, but all I was interested in was the size of the group. It could always be moved later with a simple scope adjustment. The group that formed looked very encouraging until the last shot, as I said. I could clearly see that one go high and into the center of the bull, ironically enough. But when I walked downrange to examine the target more closely, it wasn’t as good as it had seemed. A line of four shots appears to the right of the main group, and they’re strung vertically up to the center of the bull. The last one is the highest one. I never saw the other 3 shots in the string, so they could have been any of the preceding 9 shots. All I could see through the scope was the large group that formed at 7 o’clock on the edge of the bull.

Hatsan AT P1 air pistol 25 yards Kodiak target 1
Ten Beeman Kodiak pellets went into this 0.699-inch group at 25 yards.

I guess this first target took the wind from my sails. It was no better than any of the previous targets shot with this pistol. My idea that a higher fill pressure would keep 10 shots in a tighter group was bogus. But I still had time on the range, so I thought something else was in order. I adjusted the scope higher and to the right just a little, to correct for where the Beeman Kodiaks had grouped. Then, I loaded the gun with 10 JSB Exact Monster pellets. The Monster pellet weighs 25.4 grains, making it even heavier than the .22-caliber Beeman Kodiak. And it’s a JSB. I wondered if this might be the pellet that turns things around for the AT-P1 pistol.

Target 2
Alas, it wasn’t. It turned things around, all right, but not for the better. The pellets were all over the place! In the end, 10 of them printed a group measuring 1.933 inches at 25 yards. It’s more of a full-choke shotgun pattern than a group shot from a rifled barrel!

Hatsan AT P1 air pistol 25 yards JSB Monster target
Ten JSB Exact Monster pellets went into this 1.933-inch group at 25 yards. Obviously, not the right pellet for this pistol.

Final target
Now, I was really downhearted. I switched back to the Kodiaks and give them one final try. The gun was, again, filled to 3,200 psi, and 10 more pellets went downrange. This time, the results were not as good as the first time. Ten pellets made a group that measured 1.211 inches between centers. It was higher on the target and also centered better, which proves my earlier statement that the group can always be moved by adjusting the scope, but things were not getting better.

Hatsan AT P1 air pistol 25 yards Kodiak target 2
Ten Beeman Kodiak pellets went into this 1.211-inch group at 25 yards. Though they are positioned better on the bull, this group is almost twice the size of the first one.

Outcome and final evaluation
I put a lot of time and energy into testing the Hatsan AT-P1 pistol. The reward was not worth the effort, in my opinion. While I agree that Hatsan does know how to make a fine precharged air rifle, the AT-P1 pistol is not as refined as the rifles they make. It’s too large and too coarse for what it delivers. I wanted it to succeed because there aren’t that many nice PCP pistols to choose from, but the test results do not live up to the hope.

I think that if you’re interested in an airgun like thi,s you should look at the AT-P2 pistol, which comes with a shoulder stock. That way, you won’t have to learn how to hold the gun like I did here. As long as you know how few shots you’re going to get on a fill of air (7) — and you manage that, you’ll be fine.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Evanix Rainstorm 3D Bullpup
Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of the Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup PCP air rifle. Since this is such a powerful and loud air rifle, I decided not to shoot it in my house. So, today is a 25-yard accuracy test that was conducted at my rifle range. I doesn’t matter, though, because 25 yards is the same indoors or out.

You may recall that I adjusted the trigger last time. I said I got it as light as it would safely go because the adjustment acts on the sear contact area, so this day on the range was the first real chance I had to test it under real shooting circumstances. Although it’s a little heavy at 6 lbs., 10 oz., it’s now reasonably crisp. There is no significant creep in the trigger, which for a bullpup is pretty amazing. It’s about the same as some military rifle triggers. I can shoot this rifle with no excuses.

Someone thought that the rifle would be easy to cock because the sidelever is on the right side of the receiver. Well, touch your right shoulder with your right index finger to get an idea of how easy it is. I found it best to dismount the rifle from my shoulder to cock it each time.

Another assumption I made while in my office was that the Bug Buster scope that comes with medium-high rings would work well on this rifle. Size-wise it does look good; but when I went to shoot off the bench, I discovered that the high rings will be best, after all. That’s no reflection on the Bug Buster scope — the rings just need to be higher. As it is now, I have to tilt my head severely to see the image.

JSB Exact Jumbo Heavys
While I usually begin any shooting session at 10 feet to check the scope’s alignment, this time I settled down at 25 yards and just started shooting. The pellets for the first group landed 3 inches low and 1.5 inches to the left, which is not bad for just mounting the scope and shooting without sighting in. The first group was 10 JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy pellets — an 18.1-grain dome that often works well in airguns in this 40 foot-pound power range.

The first group measures 0.574 inches for 10 shot at 25 yards. I thought that was an auspicious start for this rifle.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards JSB Exact Jumbo 18-grain group
Ten shots into 0.574 inches at 25 yards is a good start.

The rifle doesn’t move when it fires. I think that’s due to the weight, though I had a good hold on it, since I was in a somewhat odd position and had a tight grasp, just to see through the scope.

JSB Exact Jumbo Monsters
After the first group, I adjusted the scope by guesswork and brought the next group up to just under the bull I was aiming at. This was with a clip of the 25.4-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Monster pellets. This is another dome that’s even heavier than the tried-and-true Beeman Kodiaks. They acted like they wanted to group, but a couple strayed outside the main concentration, making me think they’re not the best for this rifle. Too bad; because at that weight, they really pack the punch.

Two pellets got stuck in the clip and had to be unloaded and reloaded to work right. That would be reason enough not to pick this pellet.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards JSB Exact Monster 25-grain group
Ten JSB Jumbo Monster pellets went into 0.942 inches at 25 yards. Two pellets got stuck in the clip, so this pellet is not recommended for the 3D bullpup.

Eun Jin
Next, I tried 10 of the 28.4-grain Eun Jin domes. They just barely fit in the clip lengthwise and 2 got stuck in the magazine; but if they were accurate enough, I could overlook any shortcomings just to get the extra power. Ten landed in a group that measures 0.666 inches. That’s pretty darned good when the extra power is needed.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards Eun Jin group
Ten Eun Jin pellets went into 0.666 inches at 25 yards. Two pellets got stuck in the clip, so this pellet is only recommended for this rifle when you need the extra power.

Beeman Kodiak
It was time to try the Beeman Kodiaks that I thought might be one of the best pellets in this rifle. And I was right! Ten of them went into a group measuring 0.491 inches — the smallest group of the test! Don’t be misled by the appearance of this group. It does appear larger than the first group, but careful measuring shows that it’s smaller.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards Beeman Kodiak group
Ten Beeman Kodiaks went into 0.491 inches at 25 yards. No pellets were stuck in the clip, so this is the pellet of choice for the Evanix 3D bullpup.

RWS Superdome
The last pellet I tried was the 14.5-grain RWS Superdome. It’s a very popular pellet — especially among spring-gun shooters, so I thought I’d include it in this test. Boy, what a dramatic finish it was! Ten Superdomes went into a group that measures 2.914 inches between centers! If I hadn’t shot it myself I wouldn’t have believed it after seeing all those other groups! Obviously, I’m not going to recommend Superdomes for the Rainstorm 3D bullpup!

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup 25 yards RWS Superdome group
Ten RWS Superdomes went into 2.914 inches at 25 yards. This is a non-starter for this rifle.

Cool carrying case
A while back, AirForce Airguns presented me with a TalonP pistol that I tested for you. They were kind enough to put it in one of their soft carry bags, and I found that it fits this bullpup perfectly! After posting this, Edith told me that the bag is no longer being made. If you are buying the 3D, you might want to try one of the tactical bags made by Leapers. They’re about the same size and are already linked to the gun on Pyramyd Air’s site.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup AirForce case closed
The AirForce tactical bag is perfect for the Rainstorm 3D bullpup.

Evanix Rainstorm 3D bullpup AirForce case open
Besides the rifle, there are many zippered pockets for the rest of your shooting stuff.

General impression thus far
I learned in this session that, while the Bug Buster is a wonderful scope, the medium-high rings it comes with are too low for this bullpup. Since I’ll be changing the rings anyway, I’ll use this opportunity to mount a different scope on the Rainstorm 3D bullpup.

I also learned that JSB Exact Jumbo Heavys (the 18.1-grain dome) and Beeman Kodiaks are the 2 best pellets in the test rifle. Next time, I’ll shoot these 2, plus perhaps one additional pellet I haven’t tried yet. That will be the final test at 50 yards.

The bullpup configuration was never meant to be shot from a bench. It would feel and handle much better in the offhand position, I’m sure. But the test was to prove how well the rifle shoots, which is why I shot it rested.

The long pull length is no hinderance whatsoever. I found that it supports the bullpup configuration and helps you control a rifle that’s otherwise too short.

If this is a rifle that fascinates you, I would have to say it’s probably a good one to get. I’ll still shoot it at 50 yards, but I believe today’s test shows all that you wanted to see.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged repeating air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle

The Cometas Lynx V10 is an exciting precharged repeater.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Before I start, here’s a reminder that the Roanoke Airgun Expo will be held on Friday and Saturday, October 19 and 20. If you can come, try to arrive on Friday (noon to 7 p.m.), because that’s when the best deals are found — though there can be some good local walk-ins on Saturday. They say the show goes 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, but don’t believe it. By 1:30 the place starts clearing out fast.

The location is in the Roanoke Moose Lodge #284 at 3233 Catawba Valley Drive in Salem, VA, but don’t expect to find it with Map Quest. Just drive up Catawba Valley Drive (which is on Map Quest) several miles until you see the Moose Lodge on a hill on your right.

Mac and I will have a couple tables there. Mac’s bringing a couple 10-meter guns, and I’m bringing that cased FWB 124 I wrote about. Other dealers like Larry Hannusch will be there, and you never know what you will find at this show. Several of our regular blog readers such Fred from the PRoNJ and RidgeRunner will also be there. If you’re a blog reader, please stop by my table and say hi. Okay, let’s get to today’s report.

Today, I’ll show you the results of shooting the Cometa Lynx precharged air rifle at 50 yards. This is the real acid test for any air rifle — precharged or otherwise. They may hold together well out to 35 and even to 40 yards, but I’ve found from long experience that 50 yards separates the good ones from the great ones. And it exposes the ones that can’t keep up.

And here’s an important reminder for newer readers. I shoot 10-shot groups unless there’s a good reason not to. I always tell you if I’m shooting less than 10 shots. Five-shot groups simply do not test a rifle’s accuracy. What they test are the laws of chance, a shooter’s hopes and a bunch of other things that aren’t important, but 10-shot groups prove the real accuracy of the airgun.

My groups will always be larger than those you see elsewhere. Ten shots will group larger than 5 shots in so many cases that it isn’t worth thinking about. Whenever I go back and read these reports to find out the accuracy of an airgun I’ve tested, I’m so glad when I tested it with 10 shots and disappointed if I tested it with less. I hate the additional work it entails, because every one of those shots has to be perfect, but the result is well worth the effort.

News from AirForce
The day before I went to the range last week to test this rifle, I got a call from John McCaslin of AirForce. He told me they’ve been testing all the Lynx rifles and they found that dialing the power back to 20 foot-pounds produced better results for them. You’ll recall from Part 2 that our Lynx is putting out pellets at close to or just over 30 foot-pounds. So, based on that information, I went to the range with the power dialed back to about 20 foot-pounds.

I did that over the chronograph the day before going to the range. There were two pellets that John told me were giving him good results — the 15.9-grain JSB Exact pellet that had not done so well for me at 25 yards and the 18.1-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy that was the best pellet in my 25-yard test.

John told me to adjust the velocity until the 15.9-grain JSB was going about 750 f.p.s., so that’s what I did. It took 2 complete turns of the power adjustment screw to get it to that velocity, where it produces 19.86 foot-pounds, and I nailed that average.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle power adjustment
The Allen screw atop the rear of the receiver (in the upper right corner of the photo) is loosened so the power adjustment screw can be turned. I had to remove the scope to loosen the top screw, so I left it loose for adjustments at the range. The position of the Allen wrench leg tells you where the adjustment has been moved relative to where you began.

To adjust the power, loosen the locking screw atop the rear of the receiver, so the power adjustment screw will turn. I had to remove the scope to get at this screw; but if I owned this Lynx, I’d cut the short leg off an Allen wrench for this job. Then the scope could remain in place.

Since I was going to the 50-yard range and the 4.5-14×42 Hawke Tactical Sidewinder scope was available, I installed it at this time. It’s the clearest scope I have, and I wanted to give the Lynx every opportunity to shine.

Beautiful day!
I get to the range very early to avoid the wind that always picks up in this part of the country. Unfortunately, on this perfectly calm day, there was another shooter already there and he was one of those super-gregarious types who likes to tell you his life’s story in 30 minutes or more (per anecdote!), so I had to be a little rude. If I’m not done shooting by 9 a.m., I’m out of time because the breeze almost always kicks up. I also had the Rogue to test on this day, but I tested the Lynx first because the Rogue’s bullets are heavy enough to buck a little breeze.

The first pellet I tested was the 15.9-grain JSB. Unfortunately, the test rifle still did not like it, even at 20 foot pounds, so I stopped the group after just 6 shots. The group was already at 1.871 inches, and I didn’t see any future in it. As I said, I was burning sunlight fast and trying to pull away from Gabby the Gunman on the next bench, so I shifted to the 18.1-grain pellets next. We were the only two shooters at the entire range complex and, with a dozen benches on the 50/100-yard line, he had to sit right next to me and shoot his short-barreled Remington 600 in .308! The blast reminded me of tank gunnery!

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB 15.9-grain-target
Even at 20 foot-pounds, the test Lynx still does not like JSB 15.9-grain pellet. I shot only 6 times at 50 yards.

While it sounds like I’m rushing, I’m actually taking a lot of time with each shot. I’m just moving as fast as possible for everything besides shooting. But with 10-shot groups, it’s vital that no shot can be called a flyer. Because if it can, you have to shoot the group over again.

The 18.1-grain pellet was much better at 50 yards, though the final shot did open the group quite a bit. But it was a perfect shot on my end — that was just where the pellet went. Ten shots went into a group measuring 1.756 inches, but 9 of them went into 1.005 inches. And this was on low power, with this pellet going about 710 f.p.s. The breeze was just beginning to kick up, so I adjusted back to high power and shot another group.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB 18.1-grain-group-low-power
Ten 18.1-grain JSB Exacts made this 1.756-inch group at 50 yards. Nine went into just more than one inch.

You might wonder how I adjusted power at the range. I didn’t have to use a chronograph, because the day before I’d discovered that the Lynx will return to a certain power level based on how far the screw is turned. All you have to do is watch the short end of the Allen wrench and use it as an indicator. I knew that two complete turns of the screw would put me back where I wanted to be, so it was that simple.

On high power, 10 shots went into 1.47 inches, but 9 of them went into 1.108 inches and 8 made a group that measures just 0.928 inches between centers. See what I mean about 10-shot groups? I shot only a couple of them, and yet I got data as good as a handful of 5-shots groups. Because with a 5-shot group, you never know….

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB 18.1-grain group-high-power
The high-power setting was better. Ten 18.1-grain JSB Exacts made this 1.47-inch group at 50 yards. Nine went into 1.108 inches and 8 made a 0.928-inch group.

The breeze was starting to pick up, and I needed to get on with the Rogue test, so there was time for just one more pellet — the big 25.4-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Monster. It had shown promise at 25 yards, so I wondered how it would translate to 50 yards. The gun was still at 30 foot-pounds, so the power should be fine. Even at this level, this heavy pellet only goes 741 f.p.s. But this one did not want to group at 50 yards! The pellets were shooting such a large open group that I didn’t even bother completing it. And I can’t show it to you because several shots were off the target paper (but still visible on the paper backer I always use).

So my test shows that the Lynx seems to group 10 good pellets into just over one inch at 50 yards. That’s good, but it has a lot of competition at the same price or better.

Final observation
The Lynx has a regulator, so it gets more shots than unregulated guns shooting at the same power. When it’s on the reg, those shots are very consistent. It has both a magazine and a single-shot adapter, so you can be satisfied either way.

Although several readers did not like the appearance of the wood stock, I like it. The work seems on par with any other high-end PCP stock. I also liked the standard Foster quick-disconnect fill fitting. And the shroud certainly works well, as the rifle never hints at the power it produces — it sounds like a .22-caliber Diana 27 springer running at 475 f.p.s.

I expect the accuracy will be the biggest sticking point for most people. With the Talon SS, Condor and Marauder on the market — all of which can produce smaller groups at 50 yards under perfect conditions — a fellow would really have to love the Lynx. He might like it because, unlike the AirForce rifles, it has a wood stock, or unlike the Marauder, the stock is slim and trim. Either way, now you know the whole story.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged repeating air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle

The Cometas Lynx V10 is an exciting precharged repeater.

Part 1
Part 2

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of the Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle for the first time. This test will be at 25 yards and will give me the opportunity to adjust the scope and to find one or two accurate pellets for this rifle. I also plan to shoot the Lynx at 50 yards, so today is preparation for that.

I used the single-shot adapter for all shooting in this test. I’ve used the magazine for this rifle and it works fine; but when I’m doing accuracy tests, I like to shoot them one at a time, if possible.

The test was 10 shots, rested, at 25 yards, unless otherwise stated. The first pellet I tried was the 15.9-grain JSB Exact pellet. I’d thought this might be the most accurate pellet in this rifle, as it often is in PCPs of this power. But this time was different, for 10 pellets made a group that measures 0.795 inches between centers! That’s not a good group for a PCP at 25 yards. It’s more of a magnum-springer group.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB Exact target
Ten 15.9-grain JSB Exacts made this group that measures 0.795 inches between centers.

That target surprised me, for I thought this pellet would be a slam-dunk, and it clearly wasn’t. That caused me to slow down and think about the test a little more.

The next pellet I tried was the Beeman Kodiak. I had played with Kodiaks earlier in this rifle, and they seemed to do well. This time, though, they didn’t group at all. I stopped shooting after 5 shots, and that very vertical group measures 0.879 inches between centers. I did notice that the pellets fit very tight in the breech, so that may be the problem.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle Beeman Kodiak target
Just 5 Beeman Kodiak pellets went into this 0.879-inch group at 25 yards. Not a pellet for this rifle!

At this point, there was nothing to lose, so I tried the Predator Polymag pellet. It has never performed well for me in the past, but I thought this time might be different. Alas, that wasn’t the case. I lost the count and shot 6 Predators into a 0.731-inch group. That’s too bad, because if you can hit with this pellet it does perform. But with accuracy like the Lynx is giving, you’re taking too big a risk when shooting at any distance.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle Predator Polymag target
Six Predator Polymags made this 0.731-inch group. Another pellet the Lynx doesn’t care for.

I switched to that old-time favorite, the Crosman Premier. These are usually good in PCPs. But in the Lynx, just 5 of them gave a horizontal group that measures 0.781 inches between centers. Another non-starter! And those who like to analyze things might consider how the rifle can string Kodiaks vertically and Premiers horizontally.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle Crosman Premier target
Five Crosman Premiers went into this very linear group that measures 0.781 inches between centers.

Finally, the pellets were found!
I was very concerned at this point. The rifle wasn’t liking any of the pellets I usually select for accuracy. But there were a couple good choices remaining. The first of these was the 25.4-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Monster, a new domed pellet that delivers a huge punch in a precharged rifle. This was the first time I think I’ve tried this pellet in a test, though the tin was already open when I started. And they grouped well in the Lynx, too! Ten made a tight group that measures 0.492 inches, and that’s with a single straggler! Nine went into 0.464 inches!

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB Jumbo Monster target
The JSB Exact Jumbo Monster shot well in the Lynx. Ten shots gave a very round group that measures 0.492 inches. This looked promising!

The next pellet I tried was the JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy — an 18.1-grain dome that some readers really admire! I haven’t gotten the best results from this pellet in the past, but this time I did. Ten went into a group measuring 0.362 inches. It was the best group of the session, and the one I will shoot first at 50 yards!

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB Jumbo Heavy target
The JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy shot best. Ten shots gave a very round group that measures 0.362 inches. This is the pellet of choice for this Lynx.

So far
I learned a lot from this test. First, I learned that accuracy isn’t always a given. You have to try other pellets to find what works. And when you find it, the difference in accuracy can be startling.

Next, I learned that how the pellets feed into the breech may have a lot to do with the ultimate accuracy. I was certainly able to feel when the Kodiaks weren’t working.

Next stop is the 50-yard outdoor range, where the Lynx will be up against the odds. Ten shots at 50 yards is a pretty good acid test of accuracy for any airgun.

Swiss Arms P92 replica pistol
Swiss Arms P92 CO2 BB pistol

More and more, we're hearing that airguns are ideal for firearm training when it comes to improving trigger control, acquiring a target and increasing accuracy. While all those are big pluses, let's remember the other reasons: (1) Save a fortune on ammo (if you can even get firearm ammo!). (2) Shoot at home. (3) No hearing protection needed. (4) Airguns are a fraction of the cost of firearms. So, click on the image & add this to your gun vault.

New .22-cal. Sheridan!
Sheridan 2260MB CO2 rifle

Sheridan has always made .20-cal. airguns. So, this new .22-cal. rifle is particularly exciting. And, it's available only in limited quantities. If you collect Sheridans (or just love them for their quality), you MUST add this to your gun vault. It's a single-shot CO2 rifle with a metal breech. Bolt-action single shots like the 2260 are ideal for teaching proper gun handling. Everything you love about Sheridan guns…and more. Get yours NOW before they sell out!