The development of the .22 rimfire cartridge: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Maynard tape primer
  • .22 Long
  • Rifling twist rate
  • Why change the twist?
  • Time of flight
  • But…
  • Inuit and the .22 Long
  • .22 Extra Long
  • The big change
  • Smokeless powder
  • Smokeless powder
  • Smokeless powder
  • The bleeding obvious
  • A lot more to tell!
  • Not even halfway!

Maynard tape primer

A reader asked about toy caps last time and I said I would show some roll-type percussion caps that were used in the Civil War. The Maynard tape primer was a mechanism that held a paper roll of percussion caps and fed them over the nipple when the gun was cocked. It actually worked and was just one of several automatic priming systems that were just ahead of the metallic cartridge era.

Maynard tape primer
The Maynard tape primer fed percussion caps automatically as the gun was cocked. It could be incorporated into the design of the gun or added on.

I ended the first report with Smith & Wesson’s launch of the .22 Short in 1857. At first it was just called a .22, but the introduction of the .22 Long in 1871 caused them to rename it the Short after that time. I didn’t mention it in Part 1 but the chamber pressure of the Short cartridge as it’s loaded today is 24,000 psi, and the bullet diameter is 0.225-inches.

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Kral Puncher Breaker Silent Synthetic .177 PCP repeater: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Kral Puncher Breaker rifle
Kral Puncher Breaker bullpup with synthetic stock.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • What happened?
  • The test
  • Sight in
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Not a benchrest rifle
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.50mm head
  • Crosman Premier heavy
  • Evaluation
  • Next

What happened?

We will start with an explanation of why I had to abandon this test until today. When I tried to scope the Kral Puncher Breaker all the shots landed quite low. At 12 feet they were 5 inches too low and even when I backed up to 19 meters they only rose an inch. I was planning to show you some new scope mounts with this rifle, but they will have to wait for another rifle that’s not a bullpup. Scoping a bullpup can be a challenge if you’re not used to it.

I searched through all my mounts and scopes, looking for a good match. The Kral rifles have Weaver/Picatinney bases, so 11mm airgun mounts won’t work.

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They’re listening!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • They’re listening
  • History
  • Benjamin Discovery
  • Not just guns
  • Companies watch other companies, too

I was frustrated this morning while trying to sight in the Kral Puncher Breaker bullpup for the first accuracy test. I was getting nowhere and burning time. It’s not the rifle’s fault. It was a confluence of imponderables that would have taken too long to sort out and get a blog ready to publish in one day. I will give you the details when I report on the rifle, so I thought I would do tomorrow’s blog today.

They’re listening

In case you wonder, “they” are everyone who is not us. That’s wisdom from the oracle of the north — Red Green. In today’s case, they are the manufacturers.

History

Back in 2005 when I first floated the idea of a 2000 psi PCP to several manufacturers I was met with skepticism. You can’t get 1000 f.p.s. on 2000 psi of air pressure. People don’t want cheap PCPs! As long as PCPs cost under a thousand dollars, that’s good enough, because the PCP market is very small.

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Air Venturi Dust Devil BBs: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dust Devil box
Air Venturi Dust Devils will hit the market in a few months.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • How to test?
  • Test 1. A single-stack forced feed BB gun
  • Daisy BBs in the Daisy 25
  • Dust Devils in the Daisy 25
  • Power in the Daisy 25
  • Test 2. Gravity feed with a magnetic breech
  • Daisy BBs in the Red Ryder
  • Dust Devils in the Red Ryder
  • Power in the Red Ryder
  • Test 3. A CO2 gun with cartridges
  • Daisy BBs in the SAA/li>
  • Dust Devils in the SAA
  • Power in the SAA
  • Velocity comparison
  • Feeding
  • What’s next?

Today I begin testing the new Air Venturi Dust Devil BBs that you read about in Part 1. To say the interest is high is an understatement.

How to test?

How do you test something that’s so new that there isn’t much precedent? I decided on the following. In Part 1 we learned that the Dust Devils weigh about 4.35 grains, so they will go faster than conventional steel BBs that weigh about 5.1 grains. I thought that was the place to start, but with a twist.
Instead of just doing a velocity test, I thought I would select three different kinds of BB feed systems and also see how well Dust Devils feed in each of them. There are more than three types of BB feeding systems, so we won’t cover everything today, however, once we see how the Dust Devils compare to standard steel BBs we may not have to test their velocity any further in the future. We will see as this test unfolds.

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The development of the .22 rimfire cartridge: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Two centuries?
  • Reverend Alexander Forsyth
  • Maintainence
  • Danger
  • Percussion cap
  • Flobert
  • Gallery guns
  • Galleries again
  • Recap

Today we begin a subject that lies at the heart of the airgun. Rather than try to defend that statement at this time, I will present evidence as we go, because the body of evidence is both large and spans much of the over two centuries of the rimfire cartridge history.

Two centuries?

Wait a minute, BB. I just read on Wiki that the .22 Short — the first .22 rimfire cartridge — was patented by Smith and Wesson in 1854 and launched to the public in their new revolver in 1857. Today is 2018. That’s only 161 years. How can you say the rimfire cartridge has been in development for over 2 centuries?

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Remington model 33 single shot rimfire: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Remington 33
Remington’s model 33 single shot .22 was their first bolt action rimfire.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • New versus old
  • Irony
  • The second test
  • Summary

Remember what I wrote about the range last Friday — how everything went bad for me? Well I did manage to test my HW85 and one other rifle. That rifle was my venerable Remington model 33.

New versus old

You may recall that I bought a nice example of the Remington 33, to hopefully replace my current rifle that’s rusted up. I was thinking that with a better barrel the new rifle would really show up the tired old bolt action I only bought to burn up discarded range ammo.

I was out on the 50-yard range, so I decided to try my luck with both rifles shooting the CCI standard velocity long rifle cartridge. First up was the old rust 33. You will recall that I had cleaned the barrel of this old beater for the first time in anticipation of this test. Well, I had forgotten to bring my reading glasses to the range, so the sights were quite blurry. Still, I did my very best and with the tired old 33 I put 5 into 2.293-inches at 50 yards. The rounds hit a little above the bull I was aiming at. That was a good start, so now let’s switch over to the nicer 33 I just bought.

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Kral Puncher Breaker Silent Synthetic .177 PCP repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Kral Puncher Breaker rifle
Kral Puncher Breaker bullpup with synthetic stock.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Magazines are easier to load
  • Crosman Premier Lights — low power
  • Crosman Premier Lights — medium power
  • Crosman Premier Lights — high power
  • Discussion
  • High velocity
  • Max power
  • Trigger pull
  • Next

Today we test the velocity of the Kral Puncher Breaker Silent Synthetic bullpup rifle. Let’s begin.

Magazines are easier to load

I found the two magazines that came with this rifle MUCH easier to load and manage than the mags I tested with the.22 caliber Kral Puncher Pro rifle last year. That one gave me numerous failures to feed in the velocity test. This one was perfect! And, when I say one, I mean that I tested both mags. It also loads easier, because I think the spring in the mag may be lighter. At least that’s how it feels.

Crosman Premier Lights — low power

I used the Crosman Premier Light pellet, to test the range of power adjustments. I started with 10 pellets at the lowest setting. They averaged 356 f.p.s., which is very slow. The low was 349 and the high was 365 f.p.s. — a spread of 16 f.p.s. That’s pretty tight for the absolute lowest power setting.

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