The shape and size of a stock

by B.B. Pelletier

Today, I’ll venture into an area where style and function can clash violently. Also, because every person is built differently, the things I say will not apply equally to all people. That is not to say they are untrue or vague enough to just be opinions; but because of differences in our bodies, each of us will have slightly different needs, and sometimes they won’t even be that slight!

1903A3 Springfield
As most countries do, the United States has a rich tradition of fielding infantry rifles with “one size fits none” stocks. I could criticize all of the Mosin Nagants or the K31 Schmidt-Rubin rifle of Switzerland, but I don’t need to look any farther than the dear old M1903A3 that was the last gasp of the famous Springfield rifle used at the start of World War II. The pull of this rifle is a ridiculous 12-3/4 inches in length that guaranteed to sock anyone in the kisser when the big round goes off. As if that weren’t enough, the stock also drops away from your face steeply to get a running start at your cheek when the recoil begins! read more


Hatsan Torpedo 155 underlever air rifle: Part 4

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3


Hatsan’s Torpedo 155 underlever is a large and powerful spring-piston air rifle.

Today is the day I mount a scope on the Hatsan Torpedo 155 and test its accuracy once more. Knowing how much interest there is, I decided to pull out all the stops and mount the best scope I have on hand — the Hawke 4.5-14x42AO Sidewinder Tactical scope. Because the Hatsan scope base allows me to mount either Weaver or 11mm rings — and because the Hawke scope has a 30mm tube — I decided to use a set of two-piece Leapers high rings made for an 11mm rail. The straight line of the Hatsan stock coupled with the high comb made such a high mount work perfectly. read more


Hatsan Torpedo 155 underlever air rifle: Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2


Hatsan’s Torpedo 155 underlever is a large and powerful spring-air rifle.

Let’s look at the accuracy of the Hatsan Torpedo 155 air rifle. The thing I was concerned about was how the movable barrel affects accuracy, and also how the gun handled in general.

The artillery hold
I knew the rifle would be sensitive to how it is held, so I approached it with kid gloves. I initially balanced the rifle with the forearm resting on my flat open hand while the heel was touching the triggerguard. That makes the rifle muzzle heavy and often it stabilizes the gun. Beeman Kodiaks were the first pellets I tried. The distance was 25 yards off a rest, and this time I used the open sights, exclusively. read more


Hatsan Torpedo 155 underlever air rifle: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


Hatsan’s Torpedo 155 underlever is a large and powerful spring air rifle.

Today, I’ll shoot the Hatsan Torpedo 155 for the first time. As you remember from Part 1, this is a huge, heavy air rifle that the manufacturer lists at 1,000 f.p.s. in the .22 caliber I’m testing.

It has a serial number
In Part 1, I mentioned that I couldn’t find the serial number. Edith looked for it and was unable to find it, either. But it’s there — directly behind the image of a pellet on the left side of the spring tube and looks like the speeding lines of a pellet in flight. Too small for old eyes, I guess. The serial number of the rifle I’m testing is 111124934. read more


Hatsan Torpedo 155 underlever air rifle: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier


Hatsan’s Torpedo 155 underlever is a large and powerful spring-air rifle. This is the actual test rifle. Isn’t it beautiful?

Today, we’ll begin a look at an underlever air rifle from Hatsan — the Hatsan Torpedo 155. This rifle has a beautiful checkered right-hand walnut stock. Those Turks can really work wood!

There are two small sling swivels attached to the stock. One is in the center of the butt at the bottom, and the other is on the left forearm. Inside the loops, they measure .75″ (21 mm), which is the European size for a leather carry strap. American shooters need to be aware of the smaller size so they can buy the appropriate slings. And, given the weight of the rifle, you’ll want one. The average size of an American sling is one inch. read more