Sig Sauer Max Michel 1911 blowback BB pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig Sauer Max Michel BB pistol
Max Michel 1911 BB pistol from Sig Sauer.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Sig answers
  • The test
  • Daisy Premium Grade BBs
  • Recoil!
  • Slide hold-open works
  • Sig BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Evaluation

Sig answers

Today is accuracy day for the Sig Sauer Max Michel 1911 blowback BB pistol. I have heard on my last report about the shot count from Ed Schultz at Sig. He was surprised my pistol got so few shots per CO2 cartridge. His experience has been an average of 77 shots per cartridge, so my test pistol is definitely running on the low end. To be fair, it was a pre-production sample they sent me more than a month ago. The production models may be more refined.

He also mentioned that this pistol was not meant for competition. That’s understood, since there is no action p[istol competition for a BB pistol like this one. Sig would do well to start one, though. It would give buyers a reason to purchase a BB gun like this.

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Mosin Nagant M1944 BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Mosin Nagant M1944 BB gun
Mosin Nagant M1944 BB gun.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Daisy Premium Grade BBs
  • Adjusted the sights
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Evaluation

Today we look at the accuracy of the Mosin Nagant M1944 BB gun. This test is almost a dare, because several readers goaded me into reviewing this BB gun. Reader Thedavemyster said he noted that some owners were saying it is almost as accurate as the Daisy 499. which we all know is the most accurate BB gun in the world. If this one comes anywhere close to that, it will be a winner.

The test

I removed the sling for better control of the airgun on the UTG Monopod. I shot seated from 5 meters using the monopod rest. The open sights are clear and sharp and very easy to see when the target is illuminated by a 500-watt lamp.

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Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • Why velocity today?
  • Oil the gun
  • Daisy Premium Grade BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Umarex Precision Steel BBs
  • No Smart Shot BBs
  • Cocking is different
  • Summary

This is our last look at Daisy’s Red Ryder, and how fitting that it comes just in time for Christmas. Every year tens of thousands of Red Ryders are sold in this nation. It’s almost an established part of the holiday season and is certainly a rite of passage for a young shooter. The Daisy company certainly thinks so, as the Red Ryder is the mainstay of their business and has been for a great many decades. No doubt there will be some changes made by the new owners at Gamo, but let’s hope they have the good sense to leave the Red Ryder alone.

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Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Quackenbush Number 7
Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • 4.4mm lead balls
  • 4.55mm balls
  • Final comment on the trigger
  • The end

Today we test the accuracy of the Quackenbush Number 7 BB gun. I’m not expecting much from this gun, based on its light construction and age. But it surprised me in the velocity test we ran last Friday, so maybe I will be surprised yet again. I know you want a report of the 2016 Texas Airgun Show, and I will get to that tomorrow, so sit back and enjoy this oldie with me today.

The test

I shot the gun at 5 meters, using the UTG monopod as a rest. I shot from the seated position, so the gun was about as steady as it could be. However, as light as it is (2 lbs. 9.25 oz) and with an almost 9 lb. trigger pull, it is going to be a challenge to get off a shot without some movement of the gun. It’s probably much easier to shoot it offhand, though nowhere near as accurate.

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Schofield Number 3 BB revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Schofield BB revolver
Schofield BB revolver.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • ASG Blaster BBs
  • Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Center aim
  • What to make of all of this?
  • Evaluation

Today is accuracy day for the Schofield Number 3 BB revolver. Lots of interest in this one, so let’s get started.

The test

I shot from 5 meters. I was seated and the revolver was resting on the UTG monopod. I used a 6 o’clock hold for most of the targets and I shot 6 shots at each target.

ASG Blaster BBs

First up were ASG Blaster BBs. Six of them made a vertical group that measures 1.579-inches between centers. It’s a lot larger than I thought it would be.

Schofield BB revolver ASG target
Six ASG Blaster BBs made this 1.579-inch group at 5 meters.

Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs

Next I loaded 6 Air Venturi Copper-Plated steel BBs into the cartridge noses and shot them. Again, the hold was 6 o’clock on the bull. These BBs went low and a little to the left, making a 1.488-inch group.

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How a vintage BB shot tube works

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Technology
  • Gravity
  • Shot tube is the true barrel
  • The shot tube
  • What keeps the BB from rolling out the barrel?
  • A spring!
  • That’s all, folks

Today’s report was suggested by a question from reader 45Bravo, who asked, “How does the shot tube retain the BB then, if not by a magnet?” That’s a good question and I know if one person wants to know there are hundreds of others who haven’t asked, but also want to know.

Technology

Bear in mind that when the Red Ryder first hit the market around 1939, there were no rare earth magnets. They came along in 1966, and have been advancing ever since. So the question remains — how do the shot tubes of older BB guns work?

Gravity

They work by gravity. They work by the same principal that the magazine of the first Gatling Gun used, back in the late 1860s. Gravity pulls the cartridges (and the BBs) down, so all that’s needed is a chute to guide the ammunition to the loading/firing mechanism. It’s a little more complex than that, but not much. And it’s all mechanical.

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Daisy’s Red Ryder: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

Daisy Red Ryder
Daisy Red Ryder.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Daisy BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot BBs
  • Baseline

Today we look at the accuracy of my vintage Daisy Red Ryder BB gun. I shot the gun with open sights today, to baseline it for the next test, which will be with an optical sight mounted.

The test

I shot the BB gun off a UTG monopod rest at 5 meters. I was seated while doing this. I used a 6 o’clock hold — resting the black bull on top of the front sight that was level with the top of the rear sight. The first BB tested was the Daisy Premium Grade BB.

Daisy BBs

You would expect Daisy BBs to do well in a BB gun made by them. Of course more than a half century separates their dates of manufacture, but today’s BBs are far superior to the ones of the gun’s period.

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