Diana’s model 5 air pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana model 5
This Diana model 5 air pistol is marked as a Winchester model 353.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Iconic air pistol
  • History
  • Winchester
  • Gun Broker
  • The gun
  • Grip
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Expected performance

Iconic air pistol

Today we begin looking at one of the most iconic air pistols of all time — Diana’s model 5. In all my years as an airgunner, I have never owned a model 5! I’ve seen them, handled them and shot them, but have never owned one. I have owned 2 Diana model 10 target pistols that are related to the model 5, if not that similar. The model 10 has the Giss anti-recoil mechanism and is the target version of the model 6, while the model 5 is a conventional recoiling air pistol. Models 5 and 6 look a lot alike, except for the round caps on either side of the model 6’s spring tube that house the Giss anchors.

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Crosman 150: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 150
Crosman’s 150 looks plain and simple, but was a pivotal airgun.

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Different type of inlet valve
  • Not much sight adjustment
  • RWS Hobby
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Change the aim point
  • Crosman Premier
  • General observations
  • The sights
  • 2016 Texas Airgun Show

Today we’ll look at the accuracy of my Crosman 150 CO2 pistol. Several of you said you have either a 150 or a 157, and this report reminded you if what a nice airgun it is. So you dug them out. I hope to hear some good reports from you.

I don’t think I have ever shot this pistol for accuracy. If I did, I forgot about it. This seemed like a test of a brand new airgun, to me.

The test

Since I knew nothing about the gun I decided to test it at 10 meters off a bag rest. Instead of 10-shot groups I went with just 5 shots, thinking I would test each pellet on both low and high velocity. That assumption faded with the very first pellet I tried.

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Crosman 150: Part 2

Crosman 150: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 150
Crosman’s 150 looks plain and simple, but was a pivotal airgun.

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Leave the pipe wrench alone!
  • Different type of inlet valve
  • Velocity test
  • RWS Hobby
  • RWS Superpoint
  • Crosman Premier
  • More on the pistol
  • Test gun

Today we look at the velocity of my Crosman 150 pistol. When I started this test the gun had been holding gas for more than a year. I exhausted the CO2 cartridge that was in it and I need to say a word about that. The 150’s design is such that there is no easy way to exhaust the gas. I just shoot it out. The CO2 chamber is filled with pressurized gas that keeps the o-ring sealing the end cap tightly until the pressure drops. But we are lucky today, because when this gun was new that o-ring was made of a different material that absorbed gas and swelled up. It sometimes had to sit empty for a couple hours before you could get the cap off!

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Hammerli 100 free pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hammerli 100
Hammerli model 100 free pistol.

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

  • Start with the best
  • CCI long rifle
  • Would not chamber!
  • Sellier & Bellot
  • Sight adjustment
  • Feel of the gun
  • Targets
  • Watch them shoot
  • Conclusion

Today we will begin looking at the accuracy of the Hammerli 100 Free Pistol. When I was a kid, I thought these guns were capable of incredible accuracy, and they no doubt are, but today I will tell you some real-life stories of how this exotic handgun works. I bet you will be surprised!

Start with the best

Whenever I test an airgun for accuracy I try to start with the pellets I think will be the most accurate. It shortens the time it takes to test the gun and I am right much more often than not. When I do get surprised, I try to make a big deal of it in the test report. because it seems so out of character for the gun I’m testing.

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Crosman 150: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 150

Crosman’s 150 looks plain and simple, but was a pivotal airgun.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Crosman 150
  • CO2
  • Benjamin 250
  • The birth of the 12-gram CO2 cartridge
  • Description
  • CO2 Powerlets leaked
  • More on the pistol
  • Test gun

Crosman 150

Today we begin looking at one of the most important air pistols ever invented — the Crosman 150. It was introduced in 1954 and had a 13-year run to 1967. The 150 is a .22 caliber single shot air pistol that has the same look and feel of Crosman’s earlier CO2 and pneumatic pistols dating back to the late 1940s. There was also a model 157, which was the same gun in .177 caliber. That caliber wasn’t as popular as .22 when the 150 was selling, so there are fewer of them around today. But that gun is identical in all ways to the 150, other than the color of the grip panels. When new the 150 was usually offered with dark brown panels and 157s were a mottled white. Over the years swaps have been made until today it is impossible to say whether the grips on a particular gun are original or not. The 150’s pistol grip is especially of interest as it has endured until today, in an unbroken line of more than 60 years! They got the grip angle right from the start and were wise to never change it. In fact, it is that grip that our guest blogger, Jack Cooper, keyed on when he selected the Crosman 2240 pistol for his pupil, Jill, to train with.

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Swedish Excellent: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Swedish Excellent
My Swedish Excellent CII rifle is a multi-pump pneumatic.

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Most important blog
  • Ammo variations
  • Swedish Excellent lead balls
  • Strange thing happened
  • Lobo balls
  • Known facts
  • Huge size variation!
  • Proof that size really matters
  • What could this mean?
  • Serendipity
  • Casey at the bat

Most important blog

Today I present to you one of the most important reports I have ever written. It doesn’t turn out the way I imagined; it turns out far better! Please enjoy what I feel is the most significant work I have done in a very long time.

Ammo variations

Today is accuracy day for the Swedish Excellent multi-pump pneumatic. In Part 2 we determined the velocity for both the Swedish Excellent round lead balls and also for some lead balls called Lobo from Argentina. The Swedish balls were about 100 f.p.s. faster than the Lobo brand balls, and we discovered that the Lobo balls are about one-thousandth of an inch larger than the Excellent balls. I think the size and perhaps even the uniformity of the ball sizes will play a big role in what happens today.

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Hakim — Egypt’s pellet rifle trainer was better than the firearm: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hakim
Hakim is Egypt’s air rifle trainer for their 8mm battle rifle.

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Shoot directly off the bag
  • Eley Wasps
  • RWS Superpoints
  • JSB Exact Jumbo RS
  • Summary

We will shoot the .22 caliber Hakim trainer today and see what the old classic is capable of. I think you will be surprised.

Shoot directly off the bag

Because the Hakim is so mild-mannered and also because it weighs 10 lbs. 7 oz., which is heavier than an M1 Garand, I rested it directly on the bag rather than use the artillery hold. I shot at 10 meters and put 10 shots into each group. The first group landed in the bull but a little to the left, and I just went with that sight setting for the rest of the test.

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