The Daisy 853: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Daisy 853
Daisy Avanti 853.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Reader ideas
  • Re-oiling the pump head
  • Old stock screws caused trouble
  • Break the spacer
  • Disassemble the action
  • Assembly
  • What’s next?

Before we begin I want to remind all of you about the Pyramyd Air Cup. It’s just about three months away! I plan to be there this year, so come out and say, “Hi” if you can.

I also want to remind you about the Texas Airgun Show that’s even closer. The tables are almost filled and most of the major manufaturers and importers will be there. Plus, American Airgunner will be there all day.

Yes, sports fans, we’re back with the Daisy 853 today. Here’s what I learned from all of you after the last report. I learned that many of you consider the 853 to be tricky to work on, as I reported. It’s not because of complexity; it’s because of the method of construction. This rifle is held together by its parts in ways that make assembly a challenge. I suppose you do get better at it after working on many guns, but there are a lot of little tricks I don’t yet know, so I find it challenging.

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Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

A history of airguns

Crosman 101
Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Baseline test
  • Hard to cock!
  • Consistency
  • RWS Hobbys
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Baracuda Match — 5.53mm heads
  • Trigger pull
  • Barrel problems?
  • Perspective

Today we look at the power my old Crosman 101 multi-pump produces. I haven’t tested it in years, so this will be as fresh to me as it is to all of you. Let’s get to it.

Baseline test

First I want to establish the velocity with differing numbers of pump strokes. Here goes. I will use the 14.3-grain Crosman Premier pellet for this.

Strokes………………..Velocity (f.p.s.)……………..Increase
2…………………………….350………………………………–
3…………………………….437………………………………87
4…………………………….496………………………………59
5…………………………….542………………………………46
6…………………………….578………………………………36
7…………………………….612………………………………34
8…………………………….635 no air remaining………….23
9…………………………….667 no air remaining………….32
10…………………………..687 no air remaining…………..20

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FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB P44
FWB P44 target pistol is Tom Gaylord’s dream airgun!

FWB P44 10-meter target pistol: Part 1
Morini 162MI Part 1
Morini 162MI Part 2
Morini 162MI Part 3

This report covers:

  • RWS R10 Pistol pellets
  • Read the manual
  • Backup
  • Adjusting the velocity
  • RWS R10 Match
  • Sig Sauer Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic pellets
  • Gages don’t agree
  • Summary

It took me a while to get back to this pistol. First there was the filming of American Airgunner, then I had the incident with the retina detachment. But I’m back at it today. Just as a reminder — this isn’t just a test of this one pistol — I’m also comparing it to the Morini 162MI 10-meter target pistol I tested for you earlier this year. That’s why I have linked to that series at the top of the report.

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The Daisy 853: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Daisy 853
Daisy 853.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • A couple things before we begin
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Results before oiling
  • How much oil?
  • Results after oiling
  • Second oiling results
  • What’s next?

I hit a home run with this one! many of you already own 853/753 rifles, and a lot of you have been waiting to get one. I now wonder why it took me 11 years to get to it?

A couple things before we begin

Today we look at velocity of the used 853 I recently bought, and I have couple things to say before we start. First, if the velocity is low, it’s not a problem, because one of the brilliant things about an 853 is how easy it is to overhaul. Daisy supplies the parts at low cost, and there are plenty of websites that walk you though installation. So if the power is low, I will rebuild the powerplant for you. Daisy rates it at 510 f.p.s, so that’s our baseline.

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The Gat’s where it’s at!: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gat
The Gat is a timeless classic air pistol. Shown uncocked here.

A history of airguns

Part 1

  • Hard cocking!
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
  • RWS R10 Pistol pellets
  • RWS HyperMAX pellets
  • Darts
  • Took longer to shoot
  • 2016 Texas airgun show

Today we look at the Gat’s power. I was also going to combine an accuracy test with today’s report, but I spent so much time just determining the velocity that I will only report that.

Hard cocking!

I reported in part 1 that the Gat is hard to cock. To cock the gun the barrel is pushed straight back, like a Quackenbush or a Crosman M1 Carbine. By the time I had tested 5 pellets and a series of darts, my left palm was sore!

hand
After about 31 shots, my hand was sore! I had to stop shooting.

Air Arms Falcon pellets

First up were Falcon pellets from Air Arms. These fit the breech rather loosely, though I didn’t know that until I had tried other pellets. They averaged 186 f.p.s. The spread went from a low of 165 f.p.s. to a high of 197 f.p.s. I had guessed that the Gat was a 200 f.p.s. pistol, so this was very close.

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Dan Wesson pellet revolver: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson pellet revolver
New Dan Wesson pellet revolver.

This report covers:

  • True Dan Wesson design
  • The cylinder release
  • Cartridges
  • Speedloader
  • BB gun, too
  • Dan Wesson grip
  • Trigger
  • Sights
  • Evaluation so far

You might read the title of this report and think the Dan Wesson pellet revolver isn’t new. Hasn’t it been around for a couple years? Not one like this one.

True Dan Wesson design

Don’t confuse this CO2-powered pellet revolver with the Dan Wesson pellet revolver I reviewed for you in the past. That gun is also marketed by ASG, but it doesn’t copy the Dan Wesson design exactly. The cylinder release on that one, for example, resembles one from a Smith & Wesson revolver. The revolver I am looking at today has the cylinder release in front of the cylinder where Dan Wesson firearms put it. This one is very realistic.

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Duke Colt pellet revolver, weathered: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Duke Colt pellet revolver

 

Colt Duke pellet revolver with weathered finish.

This report covers:

  • Website corrected
  • Installing a CO2 cartridge
  • The pellet cartridges
  • Velocity
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Shot count
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation

Happy Thanksgiving to all my U.S. readers. Hopefully you all have plenty to be thankful for.

Today we look at the velocity of the John Wayne Duke Single Action Army pellet revolver. In doing this test, I will start to get to know the gun, as well. I’ve heard a lot of comments about the accuracy and I am looking forward to finding out what’s true.

Website corrected

Someone noticed that one search page on the Pyramyd Air website that points to the SAAs was calling some of them single shots instead of single actions. It was written correctly in the product descriptions, so it took us a couple days to find the error with the help of our readers. I think those pages are all correct now. These revolvers are six-shooters, not single shots. And they are single action, which means you have to cock the hammer manually to advance the cylinder and ready the trigger for the next shot.

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