Diana K98 pellet rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana K98
Diana’s K98 Mauser pellet rifle is very realistic.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Artillery hold
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Superpoint
  • Slippery butt plate
  • Cocking effort
  • RWS Hobby
  • Shot cycle
  • Cocking lever latch
  • Results
  • Next

Today is the first of what are sure to be several accuracy days with the Diana K98 air rifle. I started slow, shooting from 10 meters off a bag and using open sights. I shot off a bag, but I did use the artillery hold. After the test it occurred to me that I should have tried a group with the rifle rested directly on the bag, but it was too late. I will do that in a future test.

As I shot the rifle I concentrated on several comments made by reader, Zimbabwe Ed. Ed has had some negative experiences with his K98, so I will address those as I go.

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BSA Airsporter Mark IV: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Airsporter
The BSA Airsporter Mark IV is an all-time classic.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Eley Wasps
  • RWS Hobby
  • JSB Exact RS
  • How is it working?
  • What now?

Sometimes the bear eats you. That will be the theme of today’s test of the BSA Airsporter Mark IV at 25 yards,  shooting with open sights.

Eley Wasps

You may recall that in the last test of this rifle at 10 meters with open sights, I got a tantalizingly good group of 9 out of 10 Eley Wasps. It was good enough to make me start the 25-yard test with the same pellet.

The first shot hit the target high on the edge of the bull at 11 o’clock. I reckoned that was good enough for me, so I shot the next 9 without looking again. I didn’t even look through the spotting scope after I was done. I just walked downrange to change targets, and thought I would see a one-inch group, perhaps with a flier or two. What was actually there was ten shots spread out in a group that measures 2.471-inches between centers. Clearly not what I had imagined!

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Diana K98 pellet rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana K98
Diana’s K98 Mauser pellet rifle is very realistic.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • RWS Hobby
  • Why is it so easy to cock?
  • H&N Baracuda Match 5.51mm heads
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Trigger pull
  • Loading is fiddly
  • Evaluation so far
  • Evaluation so far

Today is the day I test the velocity of the Diana K98 air rifle for you. A lot has been written about these rifles. Much of it has been good, but there have been a few comments that were not so good. One of them was from one of our readers who got his rifle before I got mine and he reports things like hard cocking and difficult loading because of the placement of the rear sight. He also takes exception to the location of the sling on the left side of the rifle, but that is a Mauser design and had to be put there to match the firearm. I won’t comment on that, except to say that a Mauser sling makes a rifle easier to carry while slung than a Springfield-type sling, but not as convenient for shooting as a hasty sling (look it up).

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BSA Airsporter Mark IV: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Airsporter
The BSA Airsporter Mark IV.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • My mistake
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Eley Wasps
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Airsporter Mark IV? I thought this was a Mark I, B.B. What gives?

My mistake

Apparently B.B. Pelletier is the only person in the world who can’t recognize BSA Airsporter variations. I read the serial number and compared it to the table and concluded this was a Mark I in .22 caliber. Their serial number begins with the letter G. Unfortunately, there is also a prefix GI in the list, which looks for all the world like the number one at the beginning of the serial number. Only it isn’t. I know that now, after an embarrassing first report.

Actually, I’m pleased this happened, because it illustrates one of life’s frustrating little problems — namely that BSA didn’t give much thought to assigning their serial numbers, or to the positioning of the prefix letters or to their fonts. Let me show you what I saw.

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BSF S20 air pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSF S20
The BSF S20 pistol looks like a rifle that’s been cut down to fit into a pistol grip.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Chinese copy?
  • An HW70 copy?
  • Velocity test Premier 7.9-grain
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Crosman Silver Eagle hollowpoints
  • Breech seal?
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • What’s next?

Today we’re going to see what condition my new/old BSF S20 pistol is in. I will compare it to my BSF S20 Custom Match pistol that I tested back in 2008. That pistol is shooting at the rated velocity of 440 f.p.s., for pellets that were never specified in the ARH catalog, so I guess they are Hobbys or something equally light. But before I get into that testing, I have a surprise for you.

Chinese copy?

Reader Richardwales mentioned that he had owned a couple Chinese copies of this pistol in the past. Then reader JimQwerty123 mentioned that he had also considered buying one. I answered that I had allowed $10 in trade on one (a Chinese copy of the S20) at the Findlay airgun show several years ago, and I had always intended testing it for you. Today I’m going to show you that gun and ask both readers if it is the one they were referring to in their comments.

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BSA Meteor Mark I: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Meteor
BSA Meteor Mark I.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4 
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Scope not good!
  • Sight-in
  • RWS Hobbys
  • The state of the tune
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Results

Today I shoot the BSA Meteor Mark I with its factory scope. This is a 2-power scopes that I doubt was ever filled with nitrogen, so the optics are less than sparking. They are at the toy level, at best.

The test

I’m shooting at 10 meters, using the two pellets that were the most accurate in the last test. The rifle is rested directly on a sandbag, because it demonstrated that was okay in the last test. Last time I shot at 10-meter air pistol targets, but this scope magnifies two times, so now I’m using 10-meter air rifle targets.

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Mauser 300SL target rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Mauser 300SL
Mauser 300SL. There are three finger scallops along the cocking lever.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Velocity
  • Hobby
  • Disassembly
  • Tuning tip
  • Build quality
  • It worked!
  • Oil the piston seal
  • Velocity after lubrication
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Sig Sauer Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Trigger
  • Impressions

I’m diving right into the Mauser 300SL. Today will be velocity day, plus I will try to treat the mainspring(s) with Tune in a Tube. Lots to do, so let’s get started.

Velocity

If I don’t test the velocity of the rifle before trying to tune it I know many readers will be upset, but I’m only going to test a single pellet. That will give us a before/after comparison with Tune in a Tube. However, the way this rifle vibrates, there is no way I’m not going to try to calm it down. It’s supposed to be a target rifle anyway, so raw velocity is not important.

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