Diana model 5V pellet pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 5V pistol
Diana model 5V pellet pistol.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • RWS Hobbys
  • JSB Exact RS
  • What is dieseling?
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Next
  • Observations

Today we look at the power of my old Diana model 5V air pistol. I expected to see results in the same class as the BSF S20 and Webley Hurricane, but perhaps a little slower because of the age of this airgun. I reckoned somewhere in the high 300s, at least.

RWS Hobbys

The first pellet I tested was the RWS Hobby, which is often the standard for velocity in an airgun. In the 5V Hobbys averaged 397 f.p.s., which I think is a pretty healthy result. The low was 387 and the high was 408 f.p.s., so the spread was 21 f.p.s. At the average velocity, this pellet produced 2.45 foot pounds of energy. I will add the Hobby fit the bore pretty tight.

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Millita breakbarrel rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Millitia rifle
Millita air rifle.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • An important lesson
  • RWS Hobby
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Cocking effort
  • It’s been lubricated
  • What have we learned?

Today we look at the power of the Millita rifle I bought at Findlay. The numbers will sound slow, but please remember this rifle is from the 1930s. It’s not a youth rifle, despite the velocity.

An important lesson

We will also learn something important from today’s test. I will show it to you in a little bit. Let’s get started.

RWS Hobby

The first pellet I tried was the venerable RWS Hobby. At 7 grains the Hobby is the quintessential high-speed pellet that gives the top velocity numbers that can be believed. Yes, there are lighter lead-free pellets that get thrown into the mix, but everyone knows they do not represent an airgun very well. Many manufacturers have taken to quoting two top velocity figures, one for lead pellets and the other for lead-free pellets.

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Checking out a Diana RWS 34P: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Diana 34P
The Diana RWS 34P is a classic breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle.

This report covers:

  • How to tell if the mainspring is broken
  • Tight piston seal
  • JSB Exact RS domes
  • RWS Hobbys
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Where are we?
  • Did the rifle smooth out?
  • Cocking effort
  • What are the advantages?
  • The rest of the story

Today we look at the results of yesterday’s tune on Geo791’s .22 caliber Diana RWS 34P. I talked to Tom Gore, the owner of Vortek, and asked what kind of results I could expect from this kit. He said this one was designed to make the rifle perform at the factory spec, but with much longer spring life. When I told him how the rifle had tested before he said he felt it was right on spec already. I felt so, as well. And of course that was with a broken mainspring.

How to tell if the mainspring is broken

Several of you have asked me whether it’s possible to know when a Diana mainspring has broken and I said no. If just one end of the spring is broken the gun will shoot smoother than before and will have the same velocity. I think the broken piece winds itself into the new end of the mainspring (it always does) and helps dampen vibration. Unless you are observing the performance of your rifle very carefully and watching for this you’ll never see it.

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Sig P320 pellet and BB pistol: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig P320 pistol
Sig P320 pellet and BB pistol.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The test — 1
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Experimentation
  • Failure to feed
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • The breakthrough!
  • The test — 2
  • Back to 10 meters
  • RWS Hobbys
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Sig Sauer P320 pellet pistol with pellets. I will tell you right up front — this day went differently than I expected. I actually learned a lot about the pistol, but also about myself!

The test — 1

Normally with a pellet pistol I shoot off a rest at 10 meters. I shoot 10 shots per pellet and then measure the groups, just as I do when I test air rifles. That was what I started out to do with the P320, only things didn’t go as I anticipated.

Sig Match Ballistic Alloy

I thought I would begin with Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets, so 10 were loaded into the magazine belt. They fit the chambers very tight.

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Checking out a Diana RWS 34P: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Diana 34P
The Diana RWS 34P is a classic breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle.

This report covers:

  • The breech
  • Velocity JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Superdome
  • RWS Hobby
  • Firing behavior
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Next
  • Next
  • Evaluation

Today we are back with reader Geo791’s Diana 34P, and we’re looking at the velocity. This is a .22, and a fresh one should produce velocities and power in the same neighborhood as the Beeman R1, but not quite as powerful. George was never concerned about the power of his rifle — only the accuracy that he thought was sporadic. But I do plan to tune his rifle with a Vortek kit that was donated by Vortek for this series, so either way, he wins.

Power has little affect on accuracy. Sometimes if a shot cycle can be smoothed a lot you may see tighter groups, and other times if a weak powerplant is restored to new or better the airgun might shoot better. But typically I tell people that accuracy lies in the barrel and not in the tune. However, just because I say it doesn’t make it so. We shall see.

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How to make a spring-piston air rifle shoot smooth: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Legacy SE
The Benjamin Legacy SE.

This report covers:

  • Strange report
  • The beginning
  • Over and out
  • Throttle brought it back
  • Lower velocity
  • Summary

Strange report

Today’s report is a bit strange. It could be considered one about an historic airgun, because the gun I will talk about is no longer made. I decided instead to put it into the modern section, for reasons I hope will become apparent.

It also could be considered as an open letter to airgun manufacturers, because it deals with an air rifle many shooters potentially want, though most of them don’t know it until they actually shoot the gun.

Finally, it could be considered as a chastisement of some airgunners who think that more power is the only path to happiness with an airgun. Why don’t I just tell the story and let you readers decide?

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FWB 124 air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB 124
This FWB 124 Deluxe is not the exact gun I’m writing about, but it is the same model.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Sight-in
  • The test
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Trigger
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • What’s next?

Today I back up to 25 yards and shoot the FWB 1`24 for accuracy again. I will still be using the open sights.

Sight-in

The nice thing about open sights is they are usually in the right general place. Except for guns like the BSA Meteor Mark 1 I recently tested, most guns with open sights will be on paper at 25 yards. Since this 124 was coming off a 10-meter session, I knew it had to be close.

The first shot hit high but in line with the center of the bull, so I slid the elevation slider back. Shot two landed very low, so I advanced the slider halfway and shot three was in the bull. After that I didn’t touch the sights again.

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