Best engineering practices for airguns

by B.B. Pelletier

While installing a scope the other day, I encountered the same problem that’s bothered me for years with scope mounts. How come the manufacturers make them to use three different-sized Allen screws when it would be just as easy to design them to use only one size screw all around? That way, only a single Allen wrench would be required to install the mounts and to mount the scope. That got me thinking about airgun design in general. Why is it that most manufacturers haven’t got a clue as to how their customers will use their guns? Most of us simply speculate that that is the case, but I’ve talked to enough manufacturers and engineers to know that it’s true.

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The art of collecting airguns – Part 7

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

This blog has done a lot to stimulate my own airgun hobby. I told you about the lucky accident that got me a 19th century crank-wound shooting gallery dart gun for Christmas, now it’s time for an update.

Like many of you, I cannot get out to as many flea markets, garage sales and auctions as I would like. In fact, I get to almost none of them! Instead, I have to look for alternative means of finding airguns for my collection. One of the best ways, and I have documented it already in this series, is watching the airgun classified ads and the other buying and selling websites on the internet.

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More about Gamo Match pellets: Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

This is the second part of blog reader Vince’s test of Gamo Match pellets. This will conclude the .177 pellets, and next week we’ll give you his report on .22 Gamo Match pellets.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email us.

Bloggers must be proficient in the simple html that Blogger software uses, know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them), and they must use proper English. We’ll edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

Part 1

by Vince

Pointy
This is the unnamed Chinese sidelever I blogged a little while ago, and it turned out that it was made by EMEI of China. It also turned out to be a very basic, simple gun with a very decent barrel that would shoot better and more consistently than expected. In this test it didn’t do quite as well as it had in the past.

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More about Gamo Match pellets: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Regular blog reader Vince has tested some Gamo Match pellets for us in a LOT of guns. His vast collection means he can really give a pellet the once-over to see if it’s accurate anywhere.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email us.

Bloggers must be proficient in the simple html that Blogger software uses, know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them), and they must use proper English. We’ll edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

by Vince

This is the first of two parts where I test old and new Gamo Match pellets in .177 and .22. This round is in .177. I’ll do .22 caliber another day. I wanted to see if the pellet changed enough to affect their performance.

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RWS Diana 350 Feuerkraft in .177: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Photos and test by Earl “Mac” McDonald


The RWS Diana 350 Feuerkraft is a budget version of the 350 Magnum powerplant. It still comes with open sights, so nothing more to buy.

This test has been requested many times and for over a year. I reported on the RWS Diana 350 Magnum in .22 caliber way back in February 2006. Although that report was an early one with only one short part, the real objection has been that I tested the .22 caliber rifle. Those making the request for a retest wanted me to test the .177.

For rifles in the 350 Magnum’s power class, I feel that .177 is a waste of energy. They shoot the lightweight pellets too fast for accuracy and they waste a lot of potential power because the .177 bore is too small to transmit the energy. But, people kept right on asking; and when you wore me down, I finally saw the light. So, here’s the test you’ve asked for.

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Tech Force TF79 Competition Rifle – Part 4

by B.B. Pelletier

Before I start, I have 2 announcements:

First, the January podcast is now available. My voice comes and goes, so I have to wait for it to be loud enough to produce the podcasts.

Second, the instructional video section of Airgun Academy has been filling up. I haven’t announced on the blog all the videos as they’ve been uploaded, but we’re already up to No. 18! Also, Pyramyd Air put the first 10 videos on a DVD so you can watch them on your TV or when you’re offline. Of course, you can still access them on Airgun Academy.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3


The Tech Force TF79 Competition rifle is a lot of value for a very low price.

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Benjamin Marauder pistol – Part 4

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3


With the 30mm Compact Centerpoint scope mounted, the Benjamin Marauder is set up for hunting small game.

This is the test I promised at the end of Part 3 of the .22-caliber Benjamin Marauder air pistol report back in December. You’ll remember that I didn’t think the scope I used for accuracy testing in Part 3 was doing all it could for the gun. I said I would try it again with the 30mm Centerpoint scope Crosman had sent with the gun, once I had a set of rings to mount it.

If you’re just learning about the Benjamin Marauder pistol for the first time with this report, you need to know that this pistol has taken the airgun world by storm. Just as the Benjamin Marauder rifle holds its own with European PCPs costing two to three times as much, the Marauder pistol does the same when compared to the high-priced PCPs coming from the same European companies. It’s a red-hot seller that offers unprecedented power and accuracy at an affordable price.

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