Diana 240 Classic: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 240 Classic
Diana 240 Classic.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • The scope
  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Summary

Today we examine the accuracy of the Diana 240 Classic at 25 yards when scoped. I think this will be interesting.

The scope

I mounted a nondescript Gamo 3-9X40 scope for two reasons. First, it was already in rings that would fit the rifle and second, it is the type of scope many shooters would mount on a rifle like the 240. This is the kind of scope that comes bundled in a combo, so I can’t give you a link, but we are talking about a $40 scope at the most. There is no parallax adjustment, so at 9 power the target was a little fuzzy, though I used a target with a one-inch red center that made centering the crosshairs easy.

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How do you know…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • August’s question
  • Experience
  • How do you tell…
  • Expected power
  • Piston stroke
  • Age of the gun
  • Chronograph or other means of power determination
  • How do you know? — case 1
  • Case 2
  • Last point
  • The last word

Today’s topic tries to address a question I am sure many newer airgunners have at some point. How do you know when a spring gun need repair? It was asked last week by reader August, who lives in Germany. Here is what he asked.

August’s question

”How do I recognize that an older gun piston seal is going bad? From reading the blog I gather that I can chrony it. But this gun delivered until right before the final breakdown. Only the last five shots it became slower. On opening the gun I saw that the outer part of the plastic seal was detached from the rest and had blocked the spring tube probably causing the older spring to break.

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Checking out a Diana RWS 34P: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 34P
The Diana RWS 34P is a classic breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle.

This report covers:

  • George’s rifle
  • Are Diana 34s ever not accurate?
  • Examining George’s rifle
  • It it a scope problem?
  • Use open sights
  • Condition of the test rifle
  • What I plan doing
  • What if it’s not accurate?
  • What does accurate mean?

Today we start looking at the Diana RWS 34P rifle that reader Geo791 has had trouble with. If I understand his problem, the rifle will not group for him. I think he said the best he could do at 25 yards was 10-shots in a group measuring 1.5 inches between centers of the two widest shots. George, if that’s not accurate, please enlighten us, because we want to know exactly what we are testing here.

George’s rifle

George’s rifle is a .22. He bought it for pest elimination. As I recall, the garden was the primary area of concern and chipmunks were the principal target in the beginning, but squirrels are now on the list too. He bought a .22 because he read that is was better for taking game, which I would absolutely agree with. Not that a Diana 34P in .177 can’t do the job, but in .22 it’s a lot more positive. That’s assuming you can hit what you shoot at, which brings us to the problem I am evaluating.

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FWB 124 air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB 124
This FWB 124 Deluxe is not the exact gun I’m writing about, but it is the same model.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Sight-in
  • The test
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Trigger
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • What’s next?

Today I back up to 25 yards and shoot the FWB 1`24 for accuracy again. I will still be using the open sights.

Sight-in

The nice thing about open sights is they are usually in the right general place. Except for guns like the BSA Meteor Mark 1 I recently tested, most guns with open sights will be on paper at 25 yards. Since this 124 was coming off a 10-meter session, I knew it had to be close.

The first shot hit high but in line with the center of the bull, so I slid the elevation slider back. Shot two landed very low, so I advanced the slider halfway and shot three was in the bull. After that I didn’t touch the sights again.

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FWB 124 air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB 124
This FWB 124 Deluxe is not the exact gun I’m writing about, but it is the same model.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The motivation
  • What did I get?
  • Now what?
  • Why???
  • The lesson
  • History
  • Long stroke piston
  • Summary

I had planned to tear into the Beeman R8 again today, to see whether removing most of the special new grease I put in when I lubed it would improve the velocity, but I’m not at home so I can’t do that. My other plan for today was to begin telling you about another new/old airgun I found at the 2017 Findlay airgun show. That I can do, so here we go. Let’s look at an FWB 124.

The motivation

Before I begin describing the gun I want to tell you why I’m writing about yet another FWB 124. I have already written about so many of them! The last report was titled A shrine built for a Feinwerkbau 124 and ended in February of 2011. It was a 15-part report that probably turned many readers off because it went on too long. I vowed never to write about the 124 again, but that was before this year’s Findlay show.

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Am I alone…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The questions
  • Some answers
  • The risk
  • The good news
  • Sheridan Blue Streak
  • The point

I received this comment to an older blog yesterday.

The questions

“Am I alone in wanting a Single-Stroke Pneumatic with more authority than a 10 meter or Canada-friendly option [power/velocity]? The gun I want the most would be:

1. A side lever or forearm lever single stroke pneumatic, to eliminate the need for the artillery hold and the kick of a springer and the barrel alignment issues of a break barrel.

2. Powerful enough to hunt small game humanely. Since the current 10 meter offerings seem to top out at under 5 ft./lbs. I would probably buy anything over 2/3 the muzzle energy and of comparable quality and price to the Diana 350 Magnum or Gamo Whisper Fusion 1300 springers I currently own.

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El Gamo 68-XP .22 caliber: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

El Gamo XP-68
The El Gamo XP-68.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Preparing to shoot
  • Petroleum oil or silicone?
  • Velocity determines which oil you need
  • Velocity
  • Deep-seating
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Baracuda Match 5.51mm head
  • RWS Meisterkugeln
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Evaluation so far

I said I would return to this report after I repaired the plastic clamshell halves of the buttstock. That job is now finished. I was able to epoxy the pieces of the broken post that receives the stock screw together and, although it wasn’t completely straight, it was straight enough for me to drill a new pilot hole for the wood screw that holds the two halves together. The butt is now complete, so today I will test the velocity.

Preparing to shoot

In preparation to shoot I oiled the piston seal with a lot of silicone chamber oil and let the rifle stand on its butt for a day. If it has a leather piston seal, and I am almost certain it does, the oil will be absorbed and make the leather pliable again. That should give the highest velocity.

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