Some thoughts on open sights

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • History
  • What goes with what?
  • Square post and notch
  • Tapered post and Vee notch
  • Putting this together
  • Summary

One of our readers named Mike U. asked a lot of questions about open sights. In fact, he asked more questions than I can address in one report. I did a report on the different types of open sights in 2012, but that was about the different designs — not how to use them, which was what Mike wanted to know. Today I will look at the subject from that perspective.

This subject is both simple and also very complex. I will attempt to cover the basics for you, and if any of you have more questions you can ask them in the comments to this report.

History

Guns did not come with sights at first. There were several reasons for this. First, the guns were not accurate. Hitting a man 20 feet from the muzzle was only possible if the gun was fired into a phalanx of men. Guns didn’t have triggers. They were like cannons attached to poles. In fact, they were called hand cannons. read more


Hammerli 100 free pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hammerli 100
Hammerli model 100 free pistol.

A history of airguns

Part 1

  • Limited grip adjustment
  • Clean from the breech
  • Schnable
  • The front sight removes
  • Weight
  • Carrying case
  • Summary

Today I will continue to describe the Hammerli model 100 free pistol. I’ll start with those grips that are perhaps the most flamboyant-looking pistol grips ever designed. They command attention, like the tail fins on a 1959 Cadillac.

If you study the evolution of the free pistol you’ll go back to the 19th century and see target pistols from Europe that were derived from target rifles. They had things like double set triggers and grips that were ergonomic for their day — though they don’t look so today. The grips looked like saw handles that came back over the top of the web of the palm. But beyond that, there wasn’t much more custom fitting. And the barrels were too long. They must have been frightfully muzzle-heavy! In target shooting some muzzle-heaviness is appreciated for the stability it affords, but too much is hard to hold up. read more


Hammerli trainer: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Famous last words
  • A month of frustration
  • Found on the floor!
  • One ball or two?
  • Stacking BBs
  • August to the rescue!
  • Bearing found!
  • Assembly instructions
  • Performance
  • Velocity — Air Venturi Copper-Plated Steel BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • H&N Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Daisy Avanti Precision Ground Shot
  • Fixed again!
  • Trigger pull

Famous last words

With the help of a link from reader August, I finally figured how to correctly assemble the Hammerli trainer for the Swiss K31 Schmidt Rubin straight-pull rifle. Taking it apart was no problem whatsoever, and you read about that in Part 3. Once the powerplant was apart I was able to push the jammed BBs and lead particles out of the bore. Then I cleaned the powerplant, straightened the air tube and soaked the piston seal in oil for a couple days. Then I thought I would assemble it and continue the test. In fact my last statement in part 3 was, “After that (assembly) I fully expect it to function as it is supposed to.” read more


Sig Match Ballistic Alloy target pellets: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets.

This report covers:

  • Five-shot groups
  • Crosman Challenger PCP
  • FWB-300S
  • The final test
  • Not done yet
  • The results

You may recall that a few weeks ago I tried the Sig Match Ballistic Alloy target pellets in the Morini 162MI target pistol and they came out winners. I said at the time that I planned on conducting an exhaustive test to see if these lead-free pellets are really capable of competing at the world-class level. If they are, I promised to be their principal cheerleader.

Today will be the first test of these pellets. I will pit them against other world-class target pellets in airguns of pedigreed accuracy to gauge their relative performance. I don’t expect them to win every time, because no target pellet can do that, no matter how good it is. Different airguns will prefer one pellet over all others regardless of the quality of the respective pellets. We see that in every accuracy test I run, so why should this be any different? read more


Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper Combo: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 85
Hatsan 85 MOBU Combo is an affordable breakbarrel with nice power.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Start at 10 meters
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.53mm
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.50mm
  • Crosman Premier 10.5-grains
  • JSB Exact Heavy 10.3-grain
  • 25 yards
  • Baracuda Match 4.53mm at 25 yards
  • JSB Exact Heavy at 25 yards
  • JSB Exact Heavy at 25 yards
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets at 25 yards
  • The feel of the gun
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up air rifle. We now know this is a powerful rifle that seems to have a smooth trigger. Let’s see if that means anything downrange.

Start at 10 meters

I started this test at 10 meters. Instead of 10-shot groups I fired 5-shot groups with each pellet. The only thing I’m trying to do is refine the sights and select the best pellets for further testing. All shooting today is off a rest (sandbag), using the classic artillery hold with the off hand touching the front of the triggerguard. read more


Dan Wesson 715 6mm airsoft revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson airsoft revolver
Dan Wesson 715 airsoft revolver looks and operates just like the BB revolver.

Dan Wesson 715 BB revolver Part 1
Dan Wesson 715 BB revolver Part 2
Dan Wesson 715 BB revolver Part 3
Dan Wesson 715 airsoft revolver Part 1

This report covers:

  • Velocity
  • ASG 0.30-gram BBs single action
  • ASG 0.30-gram BBs double action
  • TSD 0.28-gram BBs
  • 0.20-gram Stealth BBs
  • Thoughts about the Hop Up
  • How does Hop Up work?
  • Summary

Today is the day we check the velocity of the Dan Wesson 715 6mm airsoft revolver, but I’m going to add some things to this report. I said in Part 1 that I would tell you how the Hop Up adjustment works and show you how to adjust it, so we’ll look at that, as well.

Velocity

I usually try several different types of ammunition in a velocity test to give you a good idea of how powerful the airgun is. In the case of an airsoft gun, however, I have to constrain my test to a specific weight BB of the three most common weights — 0.12-gram, 0.20-gram and 0.25-gram. I do that because airsoft guns are designed to work best with one specific weight of ammunition and no other. In the past I have experimented with other weight BBs in some airsoft guns, but all that did was prove that the weight recommended was the best one. read more


Hammerli 100 free pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hammerli 100
Hammerli model 100 free pistol.

A history of airguns

  • Hammerli or Haemmerli?
  • Hammerli 100
  • What’s free about it?
  • Martini action
  • The side lever
  • Trigger
  • Special grips

Hammerli or Haemmerli?

Before we dive in to today’s report, a word about the spelling I have used. It is incorrect. The correct spelling of the Swiss firm uses an umlaut (two small dots) over the letter a (ä). Since the English alphabet doesn’t have umlauts, in our language the letter e follows the a — sometimes kerned closely to it. The umlaut sounds like a diphthong (aha! caught you napping in English class, didn’t we?) that most native English-speakers have difficulty pronouncing. The letter e forces our way of saying it as close as English speakers can normally come to the correct German pronunciation. That’s okay, though — most Germans cannot pronounce Connecticut, and Brits all get aluminum wrong. And, this discussion is superfluous, since almost all American shooters pronounce it Hammerelli, anyway. read more