My day at Sig Sauer: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Sig Sauer at work
  • The tour
  • Security
  • Ground rules
  • Rapid change
  • The big deal
  • Finishing
  • Test firing
  • ASP20
  • The engineers
  • Ed Schutz takes over
  • Laser-welded parts
  • Precision fixtures for every process
  • The cocking shoe
  • Summary

Last week a number of airgun writers and editors were invited to Sig Sauer in New Hampshire, to witness the start of the ASP20 production line and to tour the Exeter facilities. Those who attended were Tom McHale who writes for American Handgunner, Shooting Illustrated, Concealed Carry Magazine and too many other publications and website to list. Kristen Voss from the digital side of the NRA’s American Rifleman magazine was also there. Terry Doe and Dan Chart were there from Archant Limited, the publisher of Airgun World and Air Gunner magazines in the United Kingdom. John Bright of Highland Outdoors, a worldwide firearms and related products distributor in the UK was also there. I was there representing this blog and Firearms News in the US. read more


Punting with the FWB 124

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB 124
Feinwerkbau 124.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The ship hit the sand!
  • Plan B
  • Plan C
  • Open sights
  • Getting ahead of myself
  • The test
  • RWS Superpoints
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS R10
  • What’s up with the lone “flyer”?
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 4.50mm head
  • Discussion
  • The FWB 124
  • So what?
  • The big deal
  • Summary

Well, well. Sometimes the bear eats you! Today is one such day. I returned from my Sig trip last Thursday and wrote this report on Friday and Saturday. Everything that could go wrong did, giving me a lot to tell you about. And I have some exciting news to share today, as well.

The ship hit the sand!

I was going to test the Crosman 105 Target pistol for you today, but I couldn’t get it to hit the paper. Whoever guessed that it would shoot way low was spot-on. It shoots so low that I can’t get it up on paper, even using aim-off tricks (aiming at one thing to hit another). I have to work on the pistol before I can test it again. read more


Crosman 105 “Bullseye” multi-pump pneumatic pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 105
Crosman’s 105 is a .177 caliber multi-pump air pistol.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Test 1. How many pumps?
  • Test 2. RWS Hobby pellets
  • Test 3. Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • How stable?
  • The pump stroke
  • Pump force
  • Rear sight fix
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today we look at the power and velocity of the vintage Crosman 105 Bullseye multi-pump pneumatic pistol. I said in Part 1 that I would be surprised if this pistol breaks 450 f.p.s. Well, surprise, surprise! It didn’t even go that fast. And, that is what today’s report is all about, so let’s get started.

Test 1. How many pumps?

I looked through my library and didn’t find a manual for the 105. Crosman has a PDF online, or what they call a manual, but it’s just  a parts list and disassembly procedure. But in that document they do say to test your valve by filling the gun 6 pumps and then looking for bubbles around all the exit places. Oddly I found that 6 pumps is one too many for this particular gun. Let’s see now. read more


ASG CZ 75 P-07 Duty BB pistol with blowback: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

ASG CZ 75 P-07 BB pistol
ASG CZ 75 P-07 Duty BB pistol with blowback.

This report covers:

  • SAO
  • Threaded muzzle
  • Description
  • CO2
  • Sights
  • Testing plan
  • Summary

When I reviewed the ASG CZ 75 P-09 Shadow BB pistol recently, several readers said they owned the P-07 and liked it. Little did they know I had one ready to test.

If you look at the Pyramyd Air website you will see many ASG CZ-75-P-07-Duty-BB-pistols. This is the all-black one that has blowback. There are guns without blowback that cost less and guns with blowback and extra finishes that cost more.

SAO

This pistol I’m testing is single action only, despite the trigger appearing to be double action. Either the hammer must be cocked or the slide racked before shooting the first shot. I have already racked the slide and can tell that this slide is light. The recoil impulse from the blowback will probably be lighter than with a gun that has a heavier slide. read more


Cool stuff

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The mostest-fastest pellet gun!/li>
  • The mostest-powerfulest
  • How to generate power
  • The deal
  • What does this mean?
  • Summary

I am at Sig today, so I won’t be able to comment as much as usual. I have airguns to test, but today I thought I would do something different. Many of our readers have gotten into modifying their guns, so I will address that today. What works, what “works” and what doesn’t.

The mostest-fastest pellet gun!

There are those who want to see just how fast a pellet can be propelled, so they put together a science experiment that uses helium as the propellant gas. They looked on the periodic table and discovered that helium is the gas with the smallest atom that is safe. Hydrogen atoms are smaller, but they remember the Hindenberg disaster. read more


The importance of bullet-to-barrel alignment and fit: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Balls
  • Patched balls
  • Results of patching
  • Conical lead bullets
  • Pellet head
  • An experiment
  • Pellet skirt
  • Summary

Before I begin, I am enroute today to the Sig factory, here in America. They are bringing in a number of writers to show us their airguns and see their factory. I will take lots of pictures and tell you all about it when I return.

But I will not be able to attend to the blog the way that I normally do. I ask those readers who have been here awhile to help the new readers, just like you always do. I will be back in my office in Texas on Friday and things will hopefully return to normal.

Today I will finish the discussion of bullet-to-barrel fit and alignment. I will begin with bullets and then transition to pellets. read more


Crosman 105 “Bullseye” multi-pump pneumatic pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 105
Crosman’s 105 is a .177 caliber multi-pump air pistol.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Two variations
  • Description
  • Markings
  • Power level
  • Trigger and safety
  • Cost
  • Irony
  • Reviving the pistol
  • Summary

Today we start looking at an airgun I have owned for probably 10-15 years. I wrote about it 11 years ago, but that was just an overview. It has been laying around in my air pistol collection and I haven’t given it much consideration until recently. Once I started looking at it, though, things happened fast. That’s a story in itself.

History

The Crosman .177-caliber 105 and .22-caliber 106 “Bullseye” multi-pump air pistols were produced from 1948 until 1953. The “Bullseye” name was changed to “Target Pistol” about a year after introduction. The .177 caliber pistol came out first, followed by the .22 some time later. This was Crosman’s first foray into multi-pump air pistols. The pistols operate via an underlever pump that’s shaped like the finger lever on a lever-action rifle. In fact, some collectors have been fooled into thinking they are lever action spring-piston guns because of this. read more